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R/E/P => R/E/P Archives => Terry Manning => Topic started by: David Kulka on March 08, 2005, 11:02:26 pm

Title: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: David Kulka on March 08, 2005, 11:02:26 pm
Having dissed, discredited, and exposed many recordings and names here, suppose we pay tribute to some standouts, either well known or unknown.  Here are four nominees that may have little in common, except for the fact that they are all wonderful.

#1.  Dion, "The Wanderer", 1961.  A classic oldie, perhaps overplayed and overlooked, but when a friend cued it up on "The Fabulous Dion" CD (Ace, made in France) I just about fell over.  It sounds like it was recorded straight to 2-track, with very little compression, and all the gear working exactly right.  (I'm not saying it was --  it just sounds that way.)  The bass is fabulous, something the Protools kids should strive to achieve.  The stereo mix has loads of separation, which I happen to like.  Crystal clear -- wow.  Now this is a GREAT rock and roll track!

#2.  The Emotions, "So I Can Love You".  Terry, did you record this one?  I have the record somewhere but when the housekeeper was dusting, a lot of the old LP's got mixed up.  Anyway, what a dynamite song.  Those B3 glissando hooks are just addictive and the tambourine is undistorted, rare in a soul hit.  (That's why I think you recorded it).  This has always been one of my favorites and when I listened to it again tonight, it well stood the test of time.  I wish I could mention some of the names, if only I could find the damned album.  Anyone?  A+++

#3.  Dobie Grey, "Drift Away".  Sometime in the early 70's.  This perfect match of song and singer must have been one of those inspired accidents.  Does anyone know the story behind this great song?  Quite a lot of tape hiss during the intro -- maybe the engineer was too lazy to mute all the other tracks-- but nevermind.  The strings fit in just beautifully, and the sonics are excellent.  Was it on Decca?  ABC?  I'd sure like to know more about this hit.  It's all about why we love music, hiss or not it sounds fantastic, and I'll never tire of hearing it.

#4.  The Chi-Lites, "My Heart Just Keeps On Breakin'", 1973.  Brunswick Records Ultra Range Sound Process.  Written by Eugene Record (Record?) and Stank McKenney (Stank?) this is the perfect ying/yang, a contradiction in terms, one of a kind -- a soul/country-western track.  It was on the "A Letter To Myself" album, which I think followed the monster hit "Have You Seen Her".  The soulful harmonies, country fiddle, pizzicato strings, and doo wop chorus work perfectly together, strange as it may seem.  And guess who engineered it?  Bruce Swedien.  The album art features the Chi-Lites in big afros and gigantic gauzy, flowing robes.  iTunes doesn't have the song, but it's well worth seeking out.

So, those are MY four picks.  I'd like to hear yours.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's or 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: Bob Olhsson on March 08, 2005, 11:44:48 pm
About "The Wanderer," I understand the band was the Apollo Theater band. It was probably recorded at Bell Sound but I may be able to find out for sure from a friend.

Gene Eichelberger recorded "Drift Away" at Quadraphonic here in Nashville so I'll see if I can pick his brain.

From All Music Guide:

David Briggs Keyboards  
Gene Eichelberger Engineer  
Dobie Gray Vocals  
Mike Leech Bass  
Kenny Malone Drums  
Weldon Myrick Guitar (Steel)  
Buddy Spicher Violin  
Mentor Williams Guitar, Producer  
Reggie Young Banjo, Guitar  
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: compasspnt on March 09, 2005, 12:12:56 am
I really like this idea for a thread!  I will think very hard and come up with my list, but, regarding David's:

•Dion NEVER MADE A BAD RECORD!  "The Wanderer" is absolutely awesome in every way, but most everything he did was in the elite of recordings, too.  Very talented guy.

•At least three of the players on the Dobie Gray session were either from from 1) The Memphis Soul/R&B session groups, having played at either or both Royal (Hi, Al Green, etc., or at American (Chips Moman's old place where a lot of hits were cut!) as well as Ardent sessions, or 2) from Muscle Shoals.  (Leech, Briggs, & Young, at least).  They migrated to Nashville and did a lot of pop-country, as opposed to the total country stuff.  Great players!

More soon.

TM
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: vernier on March 09, 2005, 06:23:54 am
Rock and Roll Woman ..Buffalo Springfield
Bluebird ..Buffalo Springfield
Eight Miles High ..Byrds
Pre-Road Downs ..Crosby Stills & Nash

Awesome vocals and limiters (the two converged perfectly here), then it all disappeared at the end of the 60's. Poof!
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: Bob Olhsson on March 09, 2005, 08:22:46 am
I understand Reggie Young had been part of the first successful rock-a-billy band that paved the way for all of the Sun artists. Sam Phillips apparently couldn't ever afford him! So he had what most people would consider a successful career before emerging as what the late Tom Dowd called "the greatest accompanist of the 20th century."
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: J.J. Blair on March 09, 2005, 08:46:48 am
Funny thing about "Eight Miles High" that I noticed just recently on my iPod, halfway through the song, before Roger takes another solo, you can hear the original tracking solo bleed through the drum track.  I had never noticed that before.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: Kris on March 09, 2005, 09:16:11 am
Skin it Back - Little Feat - pure smooth tones, rolling melody, sweet slide guitars
Dream On - Aerosmith - Huge vocal
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: Gordon Rice on March 09, 2005, 09:49:43 am
Hey--

Anybody besides me think that Jefferson Airplane's "Crown of Creation" was an astonishing, life- and soul-changing moment?  For the first time, we heard something like the actual bass sound Jack Casady was getting onstage (thank-you, Al Schmitt!).  I know I haven't been the same since.

--gmr
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: Lee Flier on March 09, 2005, 10:04:05 am
GEESH.  Way too many to even list.  You'll have me here all day.

OK I have to go to a meeting, I'll think about how to narrow it down instead of paying attention to the meeting. Very Happy
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: Tim Campbell on March 09, 2005, 11:11:58 am
By the way Gordon, did you know that Spencer Dryden ( Jefferson Airplane's drummer) passed away in January. I still remember running around Boston to finally find a copy of that record when it came out ( Crown of Creation).
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: Consul on March 09, 2005, 12:53:49 pm
Not that I have many qualifications...

I'm a big fan of a song called "It's a Long Way There," by the Little River Band (1971). A great song and great-sounding production all in one. Definitely not amateur or three-chord kind of stuff.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: vernier on March 09, 2005, 01:51:13 pm
quote "halfway through the song, before Roger takes another solo, you can hear the original tracking solo bleed through the drum track."

I always thought it was an alternate lead track turned down in the mix (you're probably right though). Amazing that song was recorded in '65.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: neve1073 on March 09, 2005, 05:13:11 pm
Half my collection is from the '60s. I'll skip the obvious and offer a couple slighty obscure (although everyone here will know them):

Forever Changes-Love
Astral Weeks-Van Morrison



Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: neve1073 on March 09, 2005, 05:23:57 pm
I should add "A Love Supreme" or is that too obvious?
Another really obscure gem: "Rubber Soul" Wink
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: WhyKooper on March 09, 2005, 06:26:57 pm
I'm still trying to figure out who/where/how the 1966 hit "Talk Talk" by the Music Machine was recorded.  For it's time in 1966, those drums are really really well mic'd and recorded.  The only name I find associated with it is a producer named Brian Ross.  Never hear what the studio was, the format, the engineer, the mics.  Nada.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: WhyKooper on March 09, 2005, 06:33:28 pm
........."Rock and Roll Woman ..Buffalo Springfield
Bluebird ..Buffalo Springfield..."

I second the vote on those two.  R&R Woman is three minutes of pure pop magic.  And from a tracking/mixing standpoint, Jim Messina should really be proud of the way he engineered it..which I've told him myself a few times.  Especially since he had no automation to work with.  Listen to that one close.  There's an awful LOT going on there with the guitars.  Stuff coming in and out on the faders all over the place.  Nice dry room sound.  A really good choice of instrumentation, playing, and mixing.  

Same goes for "Bluebird".  Massive compression on that middle acoustic lead, but dang, it makes it so full.  That's one HUGE sounding acoustic guitar in the context of the overall recording.  Not bad for the spring and summer of 1967.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: WhyKooper on March 09, 2005, 06:41:37 pm
.....:"Jefferson Airplane's "Crown of Creation" was an astonishing...."

Yeah, I like that one too.  It's so weird.  The way it's put together is so strange.  The way the band sings the harmonies is so strange.  The arrangement is weird.  The ending is weird.  But that is one r-e-a-l-l-y good song and record.  I still listen to that one sometimes.  I also like their version of "Triad".
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: Lee Flier on March 09, 2005, 07:05:00 pm
I have to agree that "Eight Miles High" is one jaw dropper of a record.  "Crown of Creation" too.  Good calls!

One that's really a great example of GOOD distortion: "Lies" by the Knickerbockers.  It sounds like the tape is about to melt down it's so saturated, but it's great!  Dave Clark Five records had a tendency to sound that way too.

In the "pretty darn obscure but great" category I'd like to nominate "I See the Rain" by Marmalade.  Great vibe, great harmonies, killer melodic guitar hooks.  Check it out.  My band covers it on occasion.

Then there's the "I Can Hear the Grass Grow" by the Move.  Can't beat that bass line.

OK that's enough for at least the next 10 minutes. Very Happy
Title: Buffalo Springfield, Jefferson Airplane . . .
Post by: vernier on March 09, 2005, 07:14:58 pm
quote "Same goes for "Bluebird". Massive compression on that middle acoustic lead, but dang, it makes it so full. That's one HUGE sounding acoustic guitar in the context of the overall recording. Not bad for the spring and summer of 1967."

Yep, THE hugest ..hasn't been anything like it since.

quote "Jefferson Airplane's "Crown of Creation" was an astonishing...."

Interesting listening to it now, recording is so minimal, no tricks, just music ..the early Heider sound.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: Radd 47 on March 09, 2005, 07:21:46 pm
I really liked the live version of Fat Man in the Bathtub by Little Feet off Waiting For Columbus. I played it so much that I burned out on it.
I saw those guys right after they recorded Feet's Don't Fail Me Now at the Winterland Auditorium in SF. It was durring the Rock and Roll recession. There were about 200 people at the whole show. Walk right up and put your elbows on the stage. Lowell used a Craftsman socket to play slide.

Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: Rick Sutton on March 09, 2005, 07:40:21 pm
Just gotta add 8:05 by Moby Grape and Green Onions by Booker T and the MG's.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: J.J. Blair on March 09, 2005, 07:48:50 pm
The thing I love about having my iPod on random is REALLY listening to stuff that I never truly scrutinized, because I would never pick it to listen to.  So, I'll name some lame pop music that I think sounds amazing: "All By Myself", by Eric Carmen.  (Especially considering how shitty the Rasberries' recordings were.)  But this is an incredibly produced track and a great song, with some help from Rachmaninoff's Second Piano Concerto.  It's funny though, after the bridge, everything stops and then a drum fill leads them back in, but the drums and the rest of the bands falam on the 'one'.  That would be so unacceptable by today's standards.  LOL.  We really just kill the vibe on most shit today, don't we?

Speaking of the Move, almost all of the ELO records from the '70s just fucking kill me.  
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: vernier on March 09, 2005, 09:44:17 pm
quote "Especially considering how shitty the Rasberries' recordings were".

I love Rasberries albums (all of 'em) ..tons of energy, lots of compression, and very musical ..one of the best live bands I ever saw too.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: compasspnt on March 09, 2005, 10:29:46 pm
J.J. wrote on Wed, 09 March 2005 19:48



Speaking of the Move, almost all of the ELO records from the '70s just... kill me.  


Slightly off this topic, the last ELO album, "ZOOM," is almost unknown.  But this is a truly amazing piece of work.  Jeff's finest hour, in my humble opinion.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: J.J. Blair on March 09, 2005, 11:10:02 pm
Well, my point about the Rasberries was that those records, as great as they are, ain't the best examples of 'hi-fidelity'.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: vernier on March 09, 2005, 11:35:57 pm
Right ..true.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: David Kulka on March 10, 2005, 12:18:42 am
I've been traveling all day and after checking in to my hotel and taking a look at the thread, was amazed to see so many replies.

A lot of those songs are on vinyl records that I've still got, but haven't listened to in ages.  Others are tunes I'd never heard of before.  After getting home I look forward to spinning a few of the old disks again, and buying some of the others on iTunes.

Thanks to all who have replied, and thanks in particular to those who explained what made their favorites stand out, and delved into the stories behind them.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: vernier on March 10, 2005, 01:01:25 am
Wait ..there's more! ...

"I've Been Waiting For You" from Neil Young's first album. Also, "The Emperor Of Wyoming" and a couple others.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: greg thum on March 10, 2005, 10:35:06 am
" Journey To The Center Of The Mind" by The Amboy Dukes [Ted Nugent-lead guitar]

The panning during the bridge borders on pandemonium ...can you say panache,a true 60`s classic!


 greg thum
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: vernier on March 10, 2005, 10:56:01 am
Another hot one was Nazz's "Open My Eyes" ..remember that one?
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: ericswan on March 10, 2005, 11:30:50 am
Whykooper wrote:

Quote:

I'm still trying to figure out who/where/how the 1966 hit "Talk Talk" by the Music Machine was recorded. For it's time in 1966, those drums are really really well mic'd and recorded. The only name I find associated with it is a producer named Brian Ross. Never hear what the studio was, the format, the engineer, the mics. Nada.


What I do know about this band was that Keith Olson was the bass player. He later went on to fame as producer for Fleetwood Mac and owner of Goodnight LA studio.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: greg thum on March 10, 2005, 11:39:36 am
 Murray-always been partial to "Open My Eyes"as well as "Hello It`s Me" by Nazz [Todd Rundgren`s 3rd. band].Robert "Stewkey" Antoni was an excellent vocalist,his former band "Eizabeth",had the most unique harmonies,sort of a precursor to Crosby,Stills and Nash.


greg thum
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: vernier on March 10, 2005, 12:51:11 pm
Yeah, that bass on "Open My Eyes" is just awesome (especially when it drops down for the chorus) ..fattest I ever heard on a record.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: Kendrix on March 10, 2005, 02:03:24 pm
Ill have to open my boxes of LP's in the basement to give a proper answer.

A few that immediately pop into mind include:

I second all the early Todd Rundgren/Nazz stuff.

Blood Sweat & Tears: I cant quit her

Telstar: all about production.  What a sound.

Paul Revere; Kicks.  Yeah their image and costumes were ridiculous.  Just listen to the tune.  It kicks.  FWIW Paul recent co-wote a tune that apear on the Chesterfield Kings latest.

Someone brought up the Association recently: Along Comes Mary has got something goin on IMHO.

I hate the Monkees.  However, they had some terrific songwriters working for them. If we can separate the song from the artist I'd nominate a few of their tunes.

The Rascals had some great tunes: highlights include Groovin, How can I be sure, People just wanna be free.

Becks Bolero was out of this era.  Whoooa.  

Venus: F. Avalon.  Cheesy and sentimental as hell.  But the production, feel and soaring melody of this pre-beatles pop gem just knocked me out when I was a very youngster.  I've had a soft spot for it ever since.

Up on the roof.  It still gets covered.

A bunch of Motown stuff- mostly the songs writen by Holland/Dozier.  Dancing in the streets, Heat wave... yada yada

In the "pushing the envelope category" how about Gil Scott Herons "The revolution will not be televised".  A pre-cursor to modern rap.

Beau Brummels: Just a Little

Ambrosia is a band whose stuff I still listen to once in a while.  David Pack has got one of the best rock voices ever.
From their first album Nice, Nice Very Nice and Time Waits for No One hold up today as serious compositions and productions IMHO.

Enuf fer now.  I feel old.


Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: cgc on March 10, 2005, 02:17:30 pm
These recordings which might fall under obscure:

Can's 'Vitamin C' from the album 'Ege Bamyasi' is just a killer groove.  This band isn't widely known, but Radiohead, John Lydon and other acts have stolen liberally from these German greats.  Also, 'Bel-Air' from the following album 'Future Days' is a lengthly relaxed tune that gives a sense of place as well as mood.  The best Can material (1968 to 1974) was recorded using a couple of Revox A77s and a hand built 8 channel mixer.  http://www.spoonrecords.com/

Miles Davis had a similar run of albums during the same period as Can, which pushed music into new areas.  'He Loved Him Madly' points towards ambient and electronic music where texture, mood and space take a more dominant role.  This recording really has a great sense of distance and yet keeps the feeling of ensemble playing that Miles cultivated.

Lee 'Scratch' Perry is a legendary figure in reggae, and he made some classic records at his spartan equipped Black Ark studio.  'Heart of the Congos' remains the one which stands out to me.  The opening track 'Fisherman' sucks you into the hypnotic bass driven sound, and the dub version has Scratch replacing the chorus with a spring reverb saturated orchestra of percussion.  Unreal.

Those interested in the more underground forms of rock have known John Cale's name from his involvement in the Velvet Underground, and his production work.  He has produced a number of solo records over the past three decades and they vary wildly in quality.  The peak of his work came on 1974's 'Fear' and it's opening 'fear is a Man's Best Friend' captures Cale's manic personality really well.  It starts calmly enough, but ends with crashing percussion, flailing overdriven bass and Cale' strangled howl.  Eno and Phil Manzanera oversaw the entire affair and their synth and guitar work add much to the unsettling atmosphere.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: daQuad on March 10, 2005, 02:51:07 pm
hmmmmm

Giant sound dept:
Be My Little Baby - Ronettes  Ronnie just kills.
In the Air Tonite - its a cliche now, but still...  80s?
Tarkus  ELP - they did a bunch of great-sounding stuff

Ditto on Todd and JL / ELO  they know how to get tone.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: greg thum on March 10, 2005, 03:10:26 pm
 Kendrix-just to add to your angst...you forgot.

 Laugh,Laugh by The Beau Brummels.

David Pack is a very gifted singer,a really distinctive sound.

 How about; Friday On My Mind by The Easybeats.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: vernier on March 10, 2005, 04:08:08 pm
Yep, "Friday On My Mind" is great.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: RMoore on March 10, 2005, 05:08:31 pm
cgc wrote on Thu, 10 March 2005 20:17

These recordings which might fall under obscure:

Can's 'Vitamin C' from the album 'Ege Bamyasi' is just a killer groove.  This band isn't widely known, but Radiohead, John Lydon and other acts have stolen liberally from these German greats.  Also, 'Bel-Air' from the following album 'Future Days' is a lengthly relaxed tune that gives a sense of place as well as mood.  The best Can material (1968 to 1974) was recorded using a couple of Revox A77s and a hand built 8 channel mixer.  http://www.spoonrecords.com/

Miles Davis had a similar run of albums during the same period as Can, which pushed music into new areas.  'He Loved Him Madly' points towards ambient and electronic music where texture, mood and space take a more dominant role.  This recording really has a great sense of distance and yet keeps the feeling of ensemble playing that Miles cultivated.

Lee 'Scratch' Perry is a legendary figure in reggae, and he made some classic records at his spartan equipped Black Ark studio.  'Heart of the Congos' remains the one which stands out to me.  The opening track 'Fisherman' sucks you into the hypnotic bass driven sound, and the dub version has Scratch replacing the chorus with a spring reverb saturated orchestra of percussion.  Unreal.

Those interested in the more underground forms of rock have known John Cale's name from his involvement in the Velvet Underground, and his production work.  He has produced a number of solo records over the past three decades and they vary wildly in quality.  The peak of his work came on 1974's 'Fear' and it's opening 'fear is a Man's Best Friend' captures Cale's manic personality really well.  It starts calmly enough, but ends with crashing percussion, flailing overdriven bass and Cale' strangled howl.  Eno and Phil Manzanera oversaw the entire affair and their synth and guitar work add much to the unsettling atmosphere.


GREAT to see Can mentioned here!!!

I was just considering mentioning Can for this thread.

I went through a heavy Can phase where I ate, slept and breathed CAN for years...ahh, those were the days!

I love the groove on 'Mushroom' as well from the same disc,


Thumbs up obviously on Lee Perry & the rest too,

groovy!
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: neve1073 on March 10, 2005, 05:22:49 pm
A good friend of mine did some work for Lee Perry a few years ago. Apparantly he get's very crabby if he doesn't have ganja. His wife is Swiss, I think, and organizes his life for him.

Lee Perry did some GREAT stuff!


Captain Beefheart did some wonderful records too. My faves are clearspot and spotlight kid.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: Consul on March 10, 2005, 06:07:37 pm
Right now, I'm listening to "Right Down the Line" by Gerry Rafferty, and I'm thinking, "WOW! This is some pretty cool stuff!" Very Happy

It has a very smooth sound to it that suits the song very well. Everything flows, and nothing sounds out of place.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: J.J. Blair on March 10, 2005, 07:54:00 pm
I had the tube on today, and they were showing the movie "Frequency".  At one point, Dennis Quaid is in some go-go joint and they are playing Fleetwood Mac's "Rattle Snake Shake".  An incredible song and a fucking killer 6 string bass solo.  

Speaking of which, since somebody mentioned Beefheart, about 15 years ago, when WXRT was a great station and AAA didn't yet exist, I was listening late one night and the DJ was playing "Low Yo Yo Stuff", which has subtle references to masturbation.  I knew that this DJ was a big pre-Buckingham/Nicks Fleetwood Mac fan, so I called the station to try to get him to follow it with "Rattlesnake Shake", which covers the same topic.  Well, they never answered the phone, but apparently he was thinking the same thing, because while I am waiting for them to pick up the phone, they start playing "Rattlesnake Shake".  Blew my mind.

Funny to think that Ambrosia started out as a prog rock band.  "How Much I Feel" ain't exactly prog ... but then again, neither were Phil Collins' big pop ballads.

I met Shel Talmy, recently.  I e-mailed him a couple days later and was really embarrassed when my friend who introduced us told me he was blind, because my e-mail said, "I was the tall guy wearing the plaid pants."  D'oh!  Anyway, if you think about the sound that Shel pretty much defined, that you can hear running through tunes like the Creation's "Making Time", the Kinks' "You Really Got Me", The Who's "Anyway, Anyhow, Anywhere", or the aforementioned Easybeats' "Friday On My Mind.  Nobody else was rocking that hard at the time.  That's some ground breaking shit.

BTW, is it just me or did the stuff that Rundgren engineered himself towards the end of the '70s and early '80s really sound like ass?
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: Greg Dixon on March 10, 2005, 07:55:02 pm
What about 'Waterloo Sunset' by The Kinks. A rough as guts recording, that always brings a smile to my face. Very Happy Same deal with some of Dylan's albums. Rough peformances, that would never be released today, but they just take you somewhere else.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: compasspnt on March 10, 2005, 08:13:22 pm
Murray Cullen wrote on Thu, 10 March 2005 16:08

Yep, "Friday On My Mind" is great.


I agree that "Friday On My Mind" is one of the all time great tracks..and The Easybeats an all time great group.

Off topic a bit, here is a very strange fact concerning a member of The Easybeats, Stevie Wright:

"...In later years he suffered debilitating drug and alcohol problems which were further exacerbated by his self-admission to the notorious Chelmsford Private Hospital in Sydney; director Dr. Harry Bailey administered a highly controversial treatment known as "deep sleep therapy" which allegedly cured drug addiction with a combination of drug-induced coma and electroshock. Many patients, including Wright, suffered brain damage and lifelong after-effects and dozens of patients died as a result of the so-called 'treatment'. The scandal was later exposed, but Bailey avoided prosecution by committing suicide..."
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: M Kearns on March 10, 2005, 09:47:16 pm
There was a US compilation of John Cale songs titled "Guts", combining the English release & songs from other Cale releases.
The vocal sound on much of these songs completely changed the way I hear recordings. The most present, in your face sound I'd ever encountered.

Also last week, a client showed up with a copy of Spooky Tooth, "Spooky Two". Absolutely wild production. The first tune begins with the entire band straight up mono except the drums split hard R/L with the left being an in time delay. When the mix moves to stereo, Bam. Classic psychedelia.

Without any elaboration,

The "Nazz Nazz", "1969, The Velvet Underground Live", The Band's 2nd LP, Jeff Beck "Truth", and of course everything Hendrix put out during his lifetime.

Yep, another old guy here.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: Lee Flier on March 10, 2005, 09:58:34 pm
Great to see so many Nazz fans!  I think "Under the Ice" is my favorite of theirs, just cuz of the killer drumming!
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: WhyKooper on March 10, 2005, 10:15:28 pm
And "Forget All About It" was cool.  I still have that Nazz Nazz see-through pink vinyl lp.  I like most of the songs on it but I've never thought the album was engineered very well.  "Open My Eyes" was really cool from the previous album.  I like it's major tape flange effect.

Ah..but for Nazz, they were ahead of the game with "Loosen Up".  When they start mangling the song, it's priceless.  I still roll on the floor laughing whenever I hear it.  "Hi everybody, we're the Nazz from Philadelphia...home of the tuna fish hoagie".
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: MB on March 10, 2005, 11:33:41 pm
Anybody know anything about this girl group, The Feminine Complex?

http://www.cherryred.co.uk/revola/artists/femininecrrev66.ht m

Recorded one record in Nashville in 1969 then nothing else.

They're a recent discovery for me and I must say it's astoundingly improbable music. Like a psychedelic garage band fronted by Shirley Bassey as played by top Nashville sessioneers. Sounds very now. I'm sure Tarantino is a fan.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: thedoc on March 11, 2005, 12:44:08 am
The Story In Your Eyes...Moody Blues.
Would love to know where and how that was recorded....

Hello...Tony Clarke?
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: WhyKooper on March 11, 2005, 08:12:01 am
Tony Clarke sometimes talks about this stuff on Mike Pinder's site.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: Radd 47 on March 11, 2005, 02:25:56 pm
Well I'll be gosh darn. I pull out my Little Feat vinyl to listen to Fat Man in the Bathtub for old time's sake and low and behold:

Recorded by: George Massenburg on a helios mobile

Mastered by: Bill Robinson at Sunset Studios.

You just never know who ya might meet around this place!

I thought of a couple of more classics,

"Long Cool Woman" by  The Hollies and

"Woodstock" by CSN&Y

BTW, Someone drove that Helios off a cliff somewhere.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: sharp11 on March 11, 2005, 09:48:47 pm
How about the early Elton John records, from say, 1971 (the madman LP), up through 1975 (Captain Fantastic)

These records have wonderful sonic attributes as well as great songs and musicianship. They just sound so fat.

Marvin Gaye's masterpiece from 1971, What's Going On

The Yes Fragile, I can remember sitting in my bedroom as a 14 year old one cold and snowy Saturday in february of 1972 just marveling at the sound of Bruford's snare drum (and all the rest of it).

I also think Joni Mitchell's records from 1973 through 1978 are stunning sonically, that would be Court& Spark, Hissing Of Summer Lawns, Hejira, and Don Juan's Reckless Daughter.

I remember George Benson's 1976 Breezin' lp excited a lot of us at Berklee College of Music at the time.

Stevie Wonder's 1979 Power Of Love was a big step up sonically.

Chicago 6 and 7 are fantastic soundind records (even if 5 is perhaps their all time best). They were cut at Carabuo in 1973 and 74.

I can recall a distinctive change in the way records sounded broken down by the following eras I've lived through, roughly:

Around 1965 with Rubber Soul one starts hearing more bass drum and a "richer" sounding bass.

Late 60's, with the advent of volume, records (some) get louder.

Early 70's; you really begin noticing a deadness and isolation cropping up.

By 1983/84, things really change as ambience and the now cliche gated snare make their appearances.

Then it's the sampling and computerized plug-ins generation, where nothing can be allowed to pass through that sounds normal; a drum set must sound like a box of tissues and a box of tissues must be sampled and reconstituted as a guitar and.......well, you get the idea.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: wwittman on March 11, 2005, 10:56:23 pm
I don't know WHY I think so, but I could swear I remember that The Music Machine record was recorded by Paul Buff (later of Allison Research)

Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: JGreenslade on March 12, 2005, 12:02:20 pm
This is an obvious example, but it surprises me that there seems to be so little info in the public domain relating to Norman Whitfield's studio techniques - particularly those employed on the Temptations, and latterly his own label productions. His use of space on the extended mix of "Runaway child, running wild" blows me away, and most of the productions he was involved with around the late '60s / early '70s sound highly futuristic even by today's standards, with some incredible subtle production touches.

Consul: I believe (may be wrong, I know several Rafferty tracks were made there) the Gerry Rafferty track you refer to was recorded and mixed at Audio International London, in which case it would've been mixed on a unique hybrid Neve / Cadac desk which was personally tweaked by both RN and Clive Green.

Justin
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: Bob Olhsson on March 12, 2005, 12:21:47 pm
thermionic wrote on Sat, 12 March 2005 11:02

This is an obvious example, but it surprises me that there seems to be so little info in the public domain relating to Norman Whitfield's studio techniques - particularly those employed on the Temptations, and latterly his own label productions...

I worked with Norman a lot during that period although the main engineer was Orson Lewis who had come to us from Media Sound with a recommendation from Valerie Simpson.

Norman had originally worked with and learned from Brian Holland. After the Hollands, engineer Lawrence Horn and Lamont Dozier left, he inherited the next generation of Motown engineers. Our new boss, Cal Harris, had been hired away from Gold Star and it turns out had interned with Chuck Britz on the Beach Boys. Cal, Joe Atkinson from Atlantic, someone whose name I forget from Chicago and Steve Smith who had worked at Stax reinvented Motown engineering. Larry Miles and I got moved out of the mastering room and into the studio. We were the luckiest people in the world to learn from and be a part of this amazing studio team.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: JGreenslade on March 12, 2005, 12:42:12 pm
Quote:


We were the luckiest people in the world to learn from and be a part of this amazing studio team.



You can say that again! From a technical standpoint, that period between the mid '60s and when the disco sound started to emerge in Whitfiled's production during the '70s constitutes a sonic standard I've yet to see bettered. There were so many deft "touches" in the records.

I guess there could be a curious "parallel" with Stevie Wonder and Whitfield's production - Wonder proved one person could take the place of a whole orchestra, which few could emulate (Bob O. has an interview somewhere on the PSW server talking about this), and influenced the "jack of all trades" syndrome that followed in less capable musicians. Similarly, Whitfield's later productions were pretty near the threshold of "over production", and he proved you could throw hundreds of ideas and touches at an arrangment and it could still gel - today we hear mixes made on DAWs that are pure "ideas and touches", lacking in terms of overall flow and crucially, source material.

I hope the above analogy makes sense!

Justin    
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: Bob Olhsson on March 12, 2005, 12:55:51 pm
thermionic wrote on Sat, 12 March 2005 11:42

...I guess there could be a curious "parallel" with Stevie Wonder and Whitfield's production  
It wasn't uncommon to do Norman's session in the morning, Stevie's in the afternoon and Rare Earth at night the same day. We had engineering shifts and worked with everybody. Every single one of us was standing on our mentors' and on each other's shoulders.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: JGreenslade on March 12, 2005, 03:40:02 pm
Bob Olhsson wrote on Sat, 12 March 2005 17:55

It wasn't uncommon to do Norman's session in the morning, Stevie's in the afternoon and Rare Earth at night the same day. We had engineering shifts and worked with everybody. Every single one of us was standing on our mentors' and on each other's shoulders.


As I've commented before, you'll have to reserve me a copy should you decide to write a book!

Cheers,
Justin
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: Dan Kennedy on March 12, 2005, 06:28:13 pm
I still think "Tumbleweed Connections" is the best EJ album ever.

Another guy, who reached moderate success but was ahead of the curve and used the same team was Shawn Phillips.

Right now I'm listenning to "Steam Powered Aereoplane" by John Hartfrod, produced by David Bromberg.

Whatever happenned to Bromberg? Did the best up-tempo bluegrassy folky druggy shit ever...
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: Strummer on March 12, 2005, 09:42:21 pm
Listening to analog stuff tonight, a couple of things not obscure, but incredible....

From my 70's living in L.A. period:

I've decided that anything Ken Scott did is great, listened to Crime of the Century and Crisis What Crisis by Supertramp, wonderful sounds, talented people.

The Tubes album with What Do You Want From Life is amazing.

"Bad Girls" by the Naughty Sweeties.

I love my turntable.


"I have traveled the world and I've never seen a statue of a critic"
Leonard Bernstein
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: Consul on March 13, 2005, 09:12:46 am
How about "Day After Day" by Badfinger? I liked that one better than "No Matter What" personally. I thought it had better sonics as well.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: Bob Olhsson on March 13, 2005, 09:32:38 am
Almost the entire worldwide recording industry lived in LA during the '70s. The seconds at any major LA room had worked with virtually every great engineer and producer there was. Unfortunately the party got out of hand and the scene collapsed but the best recordings remain true benchmarks due to the amazing collective wisdom they benefited from.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: Kendrix on March 15, 2005, 09:07:48 am
One that just popped into my head that I have to add is "Summer in the City" by the Spoonful.  

A few of their tunes stand out but this one rises above the rest IMHO.  Great imagery in the lyric,  good driving tune with good changes and energy. The break down with horns honking coming back into that pounding electric piano riff then exploding into the instrumental section via tom fills is great stuff.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: vernier on March 15, 2005, 09:51:50 am
That whole album is great .."Summer in the City", "Rain On The Roof", "Nashville Cats" etc etc.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: sharp11 on March 16, 2005, 08:16:32 am
Kendrix wrote on Tue, 15 March 2005 14:07

One that just popped into my head that I have to add is "Summer in the City" by the Spoonful.  

A few of their tunes stand out but this one rises above the rest IMHO.  Great imagery in the lyric,  good driving tune with good changes and energy. The break down with horns honking coming back into that pounding electric piano riff then exploding into the instrumental section via tom fills is great stuff.


That's one of those rare instances where everything fits together perfectly, the lyric, the tune and the production.

Yep, great one.

Ed
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: vernier on March 16, 2005, 11:15:46 am
Another 60's standout (and #1 hit) was "Venus" by Shocking Blue.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: Your Ad Here! on March 16, 2005, 01:12:27 pm
Gordon Rice wrote on Wed, 09 March 2005 14:49

Hey--

Anybody besides me think that Jefferson Airplane's "Crown of Creation" was an astonishing, life- and soul-changing moment?  For the first time, we heard something like the actual bass sound Jack Casady was getting onstage (thank-you, Al Schmitt!).  I know I haven't been the same since.

--gmr


Interesting... I was wondering why that album sounded really low fi compared to Baxters. The sonic quality really suffers on that I think (at leaset my copy of vinyl). I always thought there was a problem with the mastering job. Al?
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: Your Ad Here! on March 16, 2005, 01:18:37 pm
Kendrix wrote on Tue, 15 March 2005 14:07

One that just popped into my head that I have to add is "Summer in the City" by the Spoonful.  

A few of their tunes stand out but this one rises above the rest IMHO.  Great imagery in the lyric,  good driving tune with good changes and energy. The break down with horns honking coming back into that pounding electric piano riff then exploding into the instrumental section via tom fills is great stuff.


These guys made some great records. "Hums of" has some great stuff on it. The guitars sound great and some fine songwriting. I like the Beatles-like arrangements and sonics on some of their material.  
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: nobby on March 19, 2005, 07:55:40 pm
Lee Flier wrote on Wed, 09 March 2005 10:04

GEESH.  Way too many to even list.  You'll have me here all day.



I second that emotion.

I just finished reading what's in this thread so far and you people have good taste! Cool

One song that has started playing in my head that has many elements coming together is Midnight Confession by the Grass Roots.

Starting with one of the best intros... talk about grabbing you by the lapels! Horn arrangement up there with Chicago and BS&T. Killer bridge. Helluva job overall. Can't speak to the sonics having heard it mostly on the radio...

Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: thedoc on March 20, 2005, 12:36:05 am
Midnight Confession, Carol Kaye on bass...Great stuff!
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: David Kulka on March 21, 2005, 07:42:45 pm
Thanks to this thread and all its references to the Memphis soul hits, I've dug out a bunch of vinyl favorites and have kept the old turntable spinning. Here's one that really jumps out of the grooves -- I've been playing it over and over, it's a total delight.

index.php/fa/874/0/

Produced by Allen Toussaint (and all but one track written by him), recorded at Jazz City Studios in New Orleans, mixed at Select Sound in New York.  These are some infectious tracks, full of chugging syncopation, chicken scratch guitar, and tight horns.  Eleven great songs, and a comedy track at the end.  "Ya Ya" and "Working In A Coal Mine" had hit a few years before.  Allen Toussaint never got enough recognition.  If you want to hear a great example of his stuff, check out this record, a real gem.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: David Kulka on March 21, 2005, 08:06:30 pm
1973's "Misdemeanor" is one of the strangest R&B songs I ever heard.  When I was 17 I worked in a record store, and local DJ's used to come by with boxes of promo albums which the owner would buy for the "used" section.  A girl who was a bass player spun this for me -- it was an R&B hit, but not on the San Francisco FM's.  I remember she likened the weird harmonies and chord changes to Stockhausen, perhaps over-intellectualizing a bubblegum single?

Foster Sylvers had a hell of a falsetto, but then he was only 11.  The song is just bizarre.  I could swear I hear xylophone on it, and it's dry as a bone, no echo.  Maybe the EMT was down that day.  The Sylvers got commercial and sold more records a few years later, hitting with "Boogie Fever", produced by Freddie Perren (a wonderful man, one of the nicest clients I ever had).  A string of other hits followed.  I think the family was from Memphis, but I bet their hits were recorded in L.A.

While fishing the web I came across a site that calls "Misdemeanor" an early hip-hop influence.  Well, it's jumpy, that's for sure.  Hard to imagine that these lines could be sung in any kind of way that flows, but somehow it works.

"...Take in stride
Love and devotion
Don't confide
Its the tracks of lost emotion
Let it glide
Its gonna subside she stole my heart loved her from the start.

Watcha gonna do
When I think I'm in love
And I catch my girl doin' me wrong
Too bad
It's just enough to slip back in the start
Like when you get your first ticket for illegal parking...

But its just a misdemeanor
You gotta get-a over it
Oh he loved her from the start..."

index.php/fa/875/0/
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: compasspnt on March 21, 2005, 08:51:41 pm
Excellent David!  And cool pix also!

Two songs which always killed me, both from production and technical viewpoints were:

"Is That All There Is"

..and..

"Fever."

...both by Peggy Lee.

Some early cool production ideas.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: maxim on March 23, 2005, 03:05:49 am
i think 'shocking blue' are one of the great underrated bands of the sixties

inane lyrics (like 'baby, let me carry your bag' and 'never marry a railroad man'?!?... they were dutch,after all), but great hooks and great pop-rock arrangements

way ahead of they time, imo

cheers
max
paris, france
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: vernier on March 23, 2005, 11:47:20 am
Yeah, I only heard the one hit .. was simple, dry, and punchy.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: vernier on March 27, 2005, 03:05:33 pm
Almost forgot! ..Bohemian Rhapsody (Night at the Opera) ..Roy Baker's last album with Queen.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: J.J. Blair on March 27, 2005, 08:43:51 pm
You  know, I hate to pick something so obvious, but the production on Hendrix's version of "All Along the Watchtower", is just simply one of the greatest rock recordings ever.  From the 12-string acoustics to the vibroslap to the tambourine to the layers of electrics, it just kills me.  Not to mention, it might be my favorite Hendrix solo.

I first heard the song when I was 13 and it was a revelation.  I mean, I dropped everything to listen.  I couldn't believe what I was hearing.

The Moody Blues' Days of Future Past just happened on my random iTunes.  I can't believe how well recorded that album is.  Those sounds are magnificent, from the orchestra down to the sound of the verb.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: senorsmoke on March 27, 2005, 10:09:26 pm
hi all..first post
well being from Detroit I am partial to any of the GREAT Motown records by Marvin Gaye..."Stubborn Kinda Fellow", "Pride and Joy" , "Hitchhike" and the lesser known "One More Heartache"...great distorted maracas. The use of the reverb on these records is so powerful... the shuffling rhythm section and cries of pure soul. Magic.
I don't think it's an exaggeration to say musically and sonically Stax, Motown, Atlantic etc are a far cry from anything heard today.
There's just too much music to list from the past that is absolutely stunning.

Also, I believe the Lee Dorsey record above has the Meters as the rhythm section...untouchable. Check out "Who's gonna Help a Brother Get Further"...bet you could spin that one a hundred times.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: compasspnt on March 27, 2005, 10:54:49 pm
senorsmoke wrote on Sun, 27 March 2005 22:09

hi all..first post


Welcome George!

Quote:


I don't think it's an exaggeration to say musically and sonically Stax, Motown, Atlantic etc are a far cry from anything heard today.
There's just too much music to list from the past that is absolutely stunning.


How right you are, for the most part!

Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: Curve Dominant on March 27, 2005, 11:43:59 pm
These recordings blew my child's mind, captured my imagination, and thus helped send me on this mad path to this day:

1) "Shaft Theme," Issac Hayes.
2) "Tobacco Road," Edgar Winter
3) "Nutbush City Limits," Ike & Tina Turner
4) "Destitute & Losin'" Grand Funk Railroad
5) "Keep On Truckin'" Eddie Kendrix
6) "Space Oddity," David Bowie
7) "Autobahn," Kraftwerk
8 ) "Good Vibrations," The Beach Boys
9) "ABC" The Jackson Five
10) "Fat Albert & The Cosby Kids Theme"
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: horowizard on March 28, 2005, 12:56:15 am
Radd 47 wrote on Thu, 10 March 2005 00:21


Then there's the "I Can Hear the Grass Grow" by the Move.  Can't beat that bass line.




I saw Roy Wood's Big Band when they played the Village Underground a couple of years ago.  That's a dropped 'D' tuning on the guitar and probably the bass for that recording.

I'd have to say that SHAZAM! by The Move is a stand out masterpiece of psychedelic heavy rock.  You never heard drums sound so huge, even that late into the 60s.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: uk03878 on April 01, 2005, 08:06:46 am
Joe Meek recording the Honeycombs foot stomping - "Have I the Right" - idea then nicked by the Dave Clark Five
Done in his recording studio - aka a flat above a shop in Archway, "Norf" London
The foot stomping is actually - foot stomping on the wooden floorboards


The cliched gated snare sound - I despise it - and all came about because of actually having a vicious talkback compressor on the SSL desk - with Hugh Padgham accidentally pressing the talkback button with a Phil Collins Drum Track playback on a Peter Gabriel song... lo and behold - the 1980s gimmick was born


Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: Bob Olhsson on April 01, 2005, 08:26:21 am
uk03878 wrote on Fri, 01 April 2005 07:06

Joe Meek recording the Honeycombs foot stomping - "Have I the Right" - idea then nicked by the Dave Clark Five...
Meek, of course, had nicked the idea from Bob Crewe who had used foot stomps on the Four Seasons records. A lot of the Motown sound traces back to Crewe's influence. The most famous record I ever recorded foot stomps for was Edwin Starr's "War." I'll never forget the sight of Norman Whitfield, a large man, stomping on the sheet of plywood that we kept around for the purpose.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: compasspnt on April 01, 2005, 09:46:12 am
Bob Olhsson wrote on Fri, 01 April 2005 08:26

uk03878 wrote on Fri, 01 April 2005 07:06

Joe Meek recording the Honeycombs foot stomping - "Have I the Right" - idea then nicked by the Dave Clark Five...
Meek, of course, had nicked the idea from Bob Crewe who had used foot stomps on the Four Seasons records. A lot of the Motown sound traces back to Crewe's influence. ...


Bob,  I'm so glad you mentioned Bob Crewe.  I have intended for a couple of weeks now to mention him in this very thread.  A tremendous, quality recordist and influencer!
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: J.J. Blair on April 01, 2005, 11:34:06 am
Aren't there also stomps on Starr's "Twenty-Five Miles from Home"?  That's my favorite of his Motown hits.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: Bob Olhsson on April 02, 2005, 11:53:28 am
Sure is. Same sheet of plywood, same determined look on Norman's face, and naturally a KM-86.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: tarmadilo on April 02, 2005, 12:19:53 pm
Dan Kennedy wrote on Sat, 12 March 2005 18:28


Right now I'm listenning to "Steam Powered Aereoplane" by John Hartfrod, produced by David Bromberg.

Whatever happenned to Bromberg? Did the best up-tempo bluegrassy folky druggy shit ever...


He dropped out of the music business back in the late 80s and went to school to learn to build violins.  He still plays occasionally, but now his main gig is as owner of an amazing violin shop in Wilmington, Delaware.  Apparently he's considered THE expert on American-made violins (which he jokes is a dubious distinction!).

http://www.davidbromberg.net/home.html

Here's a cool article about his store:
http://www.out-and-about.com/article.php?articleID=102&p ageID=166&sequence=1

Strangely enough, he doesn't seem to have a website for the store!

Cheers, Tim (who sings "Sharon" with his band)
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: tarmadilo on April 02, 2005, 12:26:10 pm
I listened to a lot of albums late at night through a set of Pickering headphones back when I was a kid in the early 70s, here a few amazing sounding records that haven't been mentioned yet:

Simon and Garfunkle - Three amazing albums:
Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Tyme
Bookends
Bridge Over Troubled Water

Here's a great, somewhat obscure record:
Gene Clark - No Other

Cheers, Tim
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: vernier on April 02, 2005, 02:57:12 pm
Simon and Garfunkel were high quality ..Columbia too ..lots of tubes.

MCullen
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: Consul on April 02, 2005, 05:26:23 pm
I was listening to some CDs today and happened to put in some Traffic. "Empty Pages" is a great song, with great engineering and production all around. I did some hunting around on the web and found out that Andy Johns was involved in that record (John Barleycorn Must Die). No wonder it sounds good. Smile
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: maxim on April 02, 2005, 07:41:08 pm
tim wrote:

"I listened to a lot of albums late at night through a set of Pickering headphones back when I was a kid in the early 70s, here a few amazing sounding records that haven't been mentioned yet"

what about your avatar?

that album blew my impressionable mind

after hearing '21st century schizoid man', i knew there was no going back
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: J.J. Blair on April 03, 2005, 01:21:44 am
I :heart: Traffic.  When I was in high school in the '80s, I used to do a cover or "Pearly Queen".
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: JGreenslade on April 03, 2005, 07:08:18 am
When I caught a few minutes on TV of S + Garfunkel at the reunion gig a year or two back, I was convinced I saw a Fairchild 660 on the stage with them, anyone notice it?

Quote:


same determined look on Norman's face



So was Norman a pretty intense guy? Did he suffer fools gladly?

I can fully understand if you need to keep certain info back for a book Bob, but it would be a joy to read anything relating to Whitfield's studio ideology. Funnily enough, I got together with some musicians on Friday night after the pub, and we had a "Whitfield" session listening to the rare extended mixes of "Papa was" and "Runaway child", as well as material from his own Whitfield label. You could hear (by today's standard) that they were limited in terms of tracks and mix positioning options, yet the space available was used to great effect with such dexterity.

There does seem to be very little documentation in the public realm relating to Whitfield in the studio, if anyone can direct me towards books or links I'd be highly grateful.

Cheers,
Justin
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: record-olotta on April 04, 2005, 04:10:12 pm
this post has made me think of a lot of records... here goes...

band of gold by... maybe it's freda payne according to all music guide... i can't remember...

david bowie's diamond dogs... in my opinion one of the best produced and engineered records i have ever heard.

i agree with astral weeks...

the song Kanga Roo by Big star... the most beautiful mayhem... perfect lyrics too... ah. i just started hanging out with a beautiful young woman and i heard this song the other day and it parallels my situation... and ... and... it's just so gorgeous and heartbreaking and happy.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: David Kulka on April 04, 2005, 05:33:47 pm
Yep, Band Of Gold was by Freda Payne.  The lyric tells of a bride who discovers on her wedding night that hubby can't perform.  She winds up sleeping in a separate room, and then leaves him.  Whew, what a tragedy -- Freda Payne was gorgeous, and viagra wouldn't be around for 30 years.

And yes, Van Morrison's Astral Weeks is an absolutely amazing album in many ways  -- a work of art that totally stands the test of time.  Some of his really old recordings with Them are pretty remarkable too -- "Mystic Eyes", "Baby, Please Don't Go", and his version of "It's All Over Now, Baby Blue", which is beautiful, unusual, and haunting.

The other day I picked up the "Tom Dowd & The Art Of Music" DVD.  Wow, that's an amazing documentary, just full of great footage and stories.  Much of it overlaps with discussions that we've had here.  A scene about Booker T & The MG's has footage of them playing "Green Onions" in a club.  Holy crap, they just SMOKED!  It'd almost be worth buying the DVD for that one scene.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: vernier on April 04, 2005, 05:57:07 pm
Great documentary ....Tom Dowd makes you feel like you're there with him ..neat guy ..hope more films like that are made.



MCullen
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: cgc on April 04, 2005, 08:01:48 pm
Seven pages an no mention of The Stooges 'Funhouse'?    Hard edged sound with really intense performances that really were captured with minimal crap between the band and the tape.  A truly classic rock album in my view.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: David Kulka on April 04, 2005, 11:32:16 pm
In the discussion of foot stomping sounds, somehow no mention was made of "Foot Stomping", by the Flairs.  That's a great, early R&B/rock song.
index.php/fa/920/0/


Also, a page or two back, somebody mentioned Allen Toussaint and the New Orleans R&B songs.  Oh right, that was me.  Another of his great but now obscure productions is "Nearer To You" by Betty Harris, on the Sansu label.  With its commanding vocal, church-heart keyboards,  and soulful chorus "Nearer To You" could have been a beautiful gospel song, but instead it was a beautiful love song that made #16 on the R&B charts.

I'm not so sure that anyone here will go out of their way to find an old Betty Harris or Chi-Lites record but trust me, these are great old recordings that are worth having.  If you run across one in a used record store cheap, buy it.

P.S.  I'd like to know more about the history of New Orleans R&B and rock and I'd start a thread on it, but I guess this forum is about to be retired.  Still, if anyone here can recommend a book or DVD or two, I'd like to know about them.

P.P.S.  Thanks again, Terry.
Title: Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
Post by: greg thum on April 05, 2005, 12:08:44 pm
tarmadilo- Strange how these posts have evolved.Dan Kennedy questions,what happened to Dave Bromberg,tarmadilo responds.David Kulka mentions Tom Dowd,vernier replies...nothing unusual about that.But...

I too had lost track of Dave Bromberg`s career over the years but have some information as to how it began.Surprisingly,at least for me,he toured with Jerry Jeff Walker for a few years in the late 60`s.The original version of"Mr.Bojangles",recorded by Tom Dowd featured Dave Bromberg on second guitar.If memory serves it was recorded  at a radio station and was to be used as a demo.That "demo" version is the one used on Jerry Jeff Walker`s second album "Five Years Gone" .


greg thum