R/E/P Community

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 ... 10
 11 
 on: September 13, 2021, 11:40:33 AM 
Started by Matt Ogaz - Last post by klaus
Good news.
Please report back after your comparison test.

 12 
 on: September 13, 2021, 03:43:27 AM 
Started by Matt Ogaz - Last post by Matt Ogaz
Thank you both for the information! 

I cut the wire bridge on both mics and moved the termination of the red wire to the upper post. (I replaced the wire actually as it was too short to reach.)  After this, the formerly noisy mic is now a tiny bit quieter than the other one.  I am going to compare both mics to a pair in frequent use at a studio I work in. 

The pattern switches on both mics are somewhat noisy when switching.  I just ordered some deoxit gold to clean and lubricate them (in a needle applicator bottle, based on a recommendation found in another post on this forum.)

Thanks again for your help.

-Matt




 13 
 on: September 12, 2021, 08:10:01 AM 
Started by Eddie Eagle - Last post by Papanate
I just saw this - it's and unfortunate sign of where things are at in the world - mastering isn't as valued as recording is.

 14 
 on: September 12, 2021, 08:03:59 AM 
Started by morls - Last post by Papanate
So, I was wondering if any of the more experienced engineers could suggest some listening to give more of an idea of what a well-balanced mix sounds like before going off to be mastered? Such material might not exist, but my thinking is that I'm not going about things the right way if I try to emulate the sounds of mastered recordings while mixing (specifically the overall sound energy, reverb tails, upper range EQ and final sparkle and polish).

Any help would be very much appreciated!

Listening to finished records can sort of assist you in your final mastering - the thing is you won't know who made the decisions that you like - like a reverb tail - was it the mastering engineer or mixing engineer or the recording engineer?  Getting to know the the mix before it goes to mastering is also not going to help - because there are so few examples - what you can do is search for stems of albums (Rick Beato has a lot in his video series) and listen to those.  It's quite an eye opener because different people have very different ideas on what to send to Mastering.

 15 
 on: September 08, 2021, 12:24:24 PM 
Started by Ernie Black - Last post by Ernie Black
We will be doing the forum upgrades overnight tonight, starting at 12:01am. The forums will not be offline as they were when they were being migrated, but anyone who is logged-in will likely be automatically logged-out if they are on during the upgrade process. This will bring us up-to-date with SMF forums software.

 16 
 on: September 08, 2021, 11:57:37 AM 
Started by Matt Ogaz - Last post by klaus
Good eye! Indeed, someone had rewired connection. Snipping the bridge it without re-soldering the red wire to the top post would render the mic inoperable.

 17 
 on: September 08, 2021, 09:39:11 AM 
Started by Matt Ogaz - Last post by Kai
Snip the wire bridge "Br" - http://recordinghacks.com/pdf/akg/C414EB-service-doc.pdf) to activate phantom power on both mics and report back.

That bridge needs to be cut to reduce current consumption in these mics, down to a level that can be handled by phantom supplies.
The wire bridge, visible on the first set of your pictures, connects the upper (red wire) and center stand-off columns on the far right side of the circuit board (lower column has a black wire connection).
In the right pictured mic the red wire is soldered wrong.
It should go to the upper post, not the middle.

This doesn’t matter as long as the wirebridge Br is in place.
Once you cut the bridge this mic won’t work as intended any more.


If the noise doesn‘t go away, my major suspects are the bigger sized Tantalum Electrolytic capacitors, The bigger blue and green ones in the right picture.
These have a significant tendency to fail.
Very carefully handle the polarity when replacing.

 18 
 on: September 07, 2021, 11:02:12 AM 
Started by Ernie Black - Last post by denbrown1990
Hi. thanks for the information. this post was very helpful to me. I will definitely use it. and you use the services of a company urgent essay writing service for writing articles and dissertations. prices and quality of work will pleasantly surprise you

 19 
 on: September 07, 2021, 02:35:49 AM 
Started by Matt Ogaz - Last post by klaus
Snip the wire bridge "Br" - http://recordinghacks.com/pdf/akg/C414EB-service-doc.pdf) to activate phantom power on both mics and report back.

That bridge needs to be cut to reduce current consumption in these mics, down to a level that can be handled by phantom supplies.
The wire bridge, visible on the first set of your pictures, connects the upper (red wire) and center stand-off columns on the far right side of the circuit board (lower column has a black wire connection).

 20 
 on: September 06, 2021, 11:40:20 PM 
Started by Matt Ogaz - Last post by Matt Ogaz
I have two Silver AKG C414EB's with Teflon capsules.  One of them has a noise floor 4 or 5db higher than the other one.  The level of noise is not affected by the low cut or pad switches.   They sound the same aside from the elevated noise floor in one mic, output levels are within 1 or 2 db of each other.  The noisy mic appears to be a different revision than the other, some of the cable routing to the capsule and switches is different, among other things.

I noticed that when I switch from cardioid or fig-8 to omni on the quieter mic, I get a  slight increase in noise that quickly drops back to normal level.  When I do this with the noisy mic, the noise level instead drops much lower for several seconds  before coming back up.  During this time when the noise goes away the mic is outputting audio and sounds normal.

I have read elsewhere that noise like this can be caused by a noisy jFet or bipolar transistor in the amplifier and I should replace those.  Does this sound likely?  Thanks for any insight you can offer.

The offending noisy mic is on the right in the photos.

Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 ... 10

Site Hosted By Ashdown Technologies, Inc.

Page created in 0.023 seconds with 14 queries.