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Author Topic: 1176 on drum room mics YES, but lots of cymbal rise  (Read 7114 times)

takeout

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Re: 1176 on drum room mics YES, but lots of cymbal rise
« Reply #15 on: July 18, 2005, 09:08:09 am »

lord wrote on Sat, 16 July 2005 15:49

I have a real question. Why are rock cymbals so freeking heavy and loud in general?

They are overpowering when recording.

They're too loud in the room when rehearsing.

They ring WAY too long.

Drummers always hit them too hard anyway.

The only advantage is that they don't crack.

Why why why?

If you suggest lighter cymbals to most guys they look at you like you just suggested they should play in lace panties and high heels. So my theory is that it is all a big dick thing. Hmm?

Or is it that they sound about right with a 25db foam ear plug ? Maybe the solution to the original poster's problem is to place the room mic in a 50 piece carton of ear plugs?

Ha... I just had a mental image of the last time I heard J. play drums...
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j.hall

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Re: 1176 on drum room mics YES, but lots of cymbal rise
« Reply #16 on: July 18, 2005, 09:32:49 am »

i was trying to avoid this topic.........

*returns to looking the other way as though ignorant of what's being discussed*
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John Ivan

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Re: 1176 on drum room mics YES, but lots of cymbal rise
« Reply #17 on: July 19, 2005, 03:25:39 pm »

When your tracking, throw the 1176 {or two for stereo or the 78 :-},,,,} across the room mics and move them around until you like what you hear. Then, print them without the 1176. {you could monitor the mics  by assigning to a stereo buss that's not going to tape too.} This way, you have some idea about what will happen come mix time but you don't have to commit to the compression.

Another thing to look at is pointing the cardioid condensers away from the kit. The off axis response will be less bright and you can get a different reverb sound this way..

Just some thoughts. Hope it helps.
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zmix

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Re: 1176 on drum room mics YES, but lots of cymbal rise
« Reply #18 on: July 19, 2005, 11:31:08 pm »

That is a good point. Condensor mics are generally too bright for room ambience. Most HF reflections above 8KHZ decay very quickly, and the only true HF energy in the room comes from the direct path.

Try a ribbon,or point the mics away from the kit.

volthause

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Re: 1176 on drum room mics YES, but lots of cymbal rise
« Reply #19 on: July 21, 2005, 10:03:40 am »

Anyone ever tried a de-esser for stuff like that?

I've pulled ugly hi-hat out of a snare track before using one. Just a thought.
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brandondrury

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Re: 1176 on drum room mics YES, but lots of cymbal rise
« Reply #20 on: July 22, 2005, 09:28:13 am »

I've had issues with my overheads being too bright, even when uncompressed because of drummers who can't balance their kit.  Lately, the secret weapon for me as been using my Royer R121 as an overhead.  It has this way of ignoring cymbals.  

J.J. did a post a while back where he showed monster compressed R121s as room mics.  It seamed to exactly solve the problem you are talking about.

Brandon
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