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Author Topic: Favorite Mastering Engineer?  (Read 27186 times)

jason goz

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Re: Favorite Mastering Engineer?
« Reply #90 on: June 14, 2005, 12:39:09 pm »

There does not seem to be many UK ME's geting a mention Shocked .My favorite is Stuart Hawkes (Metropolis).

Phil Demetro

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Re: Favorite Mastering Engineer?
« Reply #91 on: June 14, 2005, 05:26:01 pm »

Jason,

I visited numerous places in the UK - Metropolis, Unity, Townhouse, 360, Abbey Road, some vinyl joints and the Soundmasters. each had something cool. Some memories...
- Unity had this futuristic "metallic" console.
- 360 had some Fairman gear which I hadn't seen up close before.
- Metropolis was total jealousy time. Big studios, big windows, a restaurant, lots of stuff custom and the whole mastering thing there seemed very well implemented. Their technical director was a suitably proud and opinionated chap but rightfully so. I got a lot of "no comment" that day! he gave me one of their AES cables to "figure out".
- Soundmasters had the loosest vibe and friendliest enginers/vibe. I stole my analog cable choice from those guys, too. Not as spectacular $$$ wise as Metropolis but Soundmasters mastering to my ears is, by far, the best in the UK. Translates better on most systems than the Metrolpolis output. Listen to Zero 7's "when it falls" mastered by Kevin Metcalf. Ridiculously good.  

Of course, London is a PMC town. The big BB5's everywhere.

I didn't see The Exchange. This is the studio owned/built by Tim DeParavicini. I can only imagine. Their vinyl is always super loud! Maybe Brad would allow some future guest discussion moderated by Tim?

Oh yeah, it was Leif Mases who hosted my little tour. He was generous and candid with his clientele. I recall that he was a fan of the work being put out by Stephen Marcussen and that the Sontec had a BIG impact on the direction of his designs.

Phil Demetro




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____________________________________________________
Phil Demetro
Mastering at The Lacquer Channel, Toronto
http://www.lacquerchannel.com/phil-demetro/
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jason goz

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Re: Favorite Mastering Engineer?
« Reply #92 on: June 20, 2005, 01:13:26 pm »

phild wrote on Tue, 14 June 2005 22:26

Jason,

I visited numerous places in the UK - Metropolis, Unity, Townhouse, 360, Abbey Road, some vinyl joints and the Soundmasters. each had something cool. Some memories...
- Unity had this futuristic "metallic" console.
- 360 had some Fairman gear which I hadn't seen up close before.
- Metropolis was total jealousy time. Big studios, big windows, a restaurant, lots of stuff custom and the whole mastering thing there seemed very well implemented. Their technical director was a suitably proud and opinionated chap but rightfully so. I got a lot of "no comment" that day! he gave me one of their AES cables to "figure out".
- Soundmasters had the loosest vibe and friendliest enginers/vibe. I stole my analog cable choice from those guys, too. Not as spectacular $$$ wise as Metropolis but Soundmasters mastering to my ears is, by far, the best in the UK. Translates better on most systems than the Metrolpolis output. Listen to Zero 7's "when it falls" mastered by Kevin Metcalf. Ridiculously good.  

Of course, London is a PMC town. The big BB5's everywhere.

I didn't see The Exchange. This is the studio owned/built by Tim DeParavicini. I can only imagine. Their vinyl is always super loud! Maybe Brad would allow some future guest discussion moderated by Tim?

Oh yeah, it was Leif Mases who hosted my little tour. He was generous and candid with his clientele. I recall that he was a fan of the work being put out by Stephen Marcussen and that the Sontec had a BIG impact on the direction of his designs.

Phil Demetro






jason goz

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Re: Favorite Mastering Engineer?
« Reply #93 on: June 20, 2005, 01:23:05 pm »

MMMMMMMMM Interesting,Pity you did not get time to visit some more rooms,Because Noel at Transfermation is also one of my  favorite vinyl ME's.I have not had an opportunity to listen to any of Kevin's recent work but his reputation is good.

carlsaff

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Re: Favorite Mastering Engineer?
« Reply #94 on: June 30, 2005, 03:31:26 pm »

I can't think of a better way to start posting here than by naming my favorite mastering engineer:

John Golden

jazzius

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Re: Favorite Mastering Engineer?
« Reply #95 on: June 30, 2005, 03:36:28 pm »

phild wrote on Tue, 14 June 2005 22:26

 

I didn't see The Exchange. This is the studio owned/built by Tim DeParavicini. I can only imagine. Their vinyl is always super loud!





I didn't know that the Ex was owned by Tim P.....that would explain why their stuff always sounds rude.

My favorite ME's are Bob L and Herb P.

JGreenslade

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Re: Favorite Mastering Engineer?
« Reply #96 on: June 30, 2005, 05:16:16 pm »

Tim de P does not own The Exchange (he designed the custom signal-path), that would be Graeme.

Graeme may well have a partner I'm not aware of, but he is the "owner" to all intensive purposes. If you visit the place you'll see interesting pieces of vintage hardware procured by Graeme strewn across the office - such as large valve limiters etc. I haven't had a chance to check out their studio yet, but if the mastering-rooms are anything to go by it should be pretty cool.

Although I have immense respect for Nilz, and would opt for him every time on a club cut, Mike would be the man if "faithful transcription" is what you're after - Mike tends to handle the LP work, whereas Nilz is booked up weeks in advance for 12s. Graeme can cut as nigh-on as loud as Nilz btw.

Justin

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TotalSonic

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Re: Favorite Mastering Engineer?
« Reply #97 on: June 30, 2005, 06:32:46 pm »

carlsaff wrote on Thu, 30 June 2005 20:31

I can't think of a better way to start posting here than by naming my favorite mastering engineer:

John Golden


His son JJ is very talented ME also - obviously you have a nice head start if your Dad is a great engineer!
JJ's work on the Rachel's CD "Systems/Layers" from 2003 definitely gets my vote for the "Honor Roll."

Best regards,
Steve Berson

Jerry Tubb

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Re: Favorite Mastering Engineer?
« Reply #98 on: July 01, 2005, 02:54:08 am »

carlsaff wrote on Thu, 30 June 2005 14:31

I can't think of a better way to start posting here than by naming my favorite mastering engineer: John Golden


Then I guess John really does have "Golden" ears !  Very Happy

I agree, John's one of the finest !
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carlsaff

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Re: Favorite Mastering Engineer?
« Reply #99 on: July 01, 2005, 06:48:24 am »

TotalSonic wrote on Thu, 30 June 2005 17:32

carlsaff wrote on Thu, 30 June 2005 20:31

I can't think of a better way to start posting here than by naming my favorite mastering engineer:

John Golden


His son JJ is very talented ME also - obviously you have a nice head start if your Dad is a great engineer!
JJ's work on the Rachel's CD "Systems/Layers" from 2003 definitely gets my vote for the "Honor Roll."

Best regards,
Steve Berson

I'm sure they don't like to be thought of as interchangeable, but I think that many people do! Both of them have very consistent, high-quality output.

Also agreed on that Rachels record -- one of my favorites from that year.

Streaky

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Re: Favorite Mastering Engineer?
« Reply #100 on: July 09, 2005, 05:27:23 am »

Just reading your comments on Kevin Metcalfe i'll pass them on he'll be more than flattered..

Just to let you know you can now use kevin and I online @ www.emasters.co.uk

cheers
streaky....

Chris Cavell

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Re: Favorite Mastering Engineer?
« Reply #101 on: July 15, 2005, 02:51:03 pm »

Okay...I think I'm finally ready to post my faves in this thread now.  I've put a ton of thought into this...and my criteria (which I'll explain as I go) seem quite a bit different than many of those who've posted their respective faves in this thread.  I've got four faves I'll mention, in no particular order:

1) Bob Ludwig
I've heard a small handful of before/after comparisons of his work over the past few years...entirely aware of what pressures and outside influences there are governing final product in some circumstances.  It's been an overwhelming eye-opening experience: that regardless of one's talent/name/top-billing/etc., we're still here to deliver something that exceeds the clients expectations...and in some cases, as an opinionated ME, you have to put aside your creative differences to pull this off.  The key is in making the best possible compromise b/w preserving the original engineers and artists' ideals for the project, applying your own ideals for the project, and delivering to the client (the one who'll actually for all real intents and purposes "own" the end result) their ideal for the project...however misinformed or contradictory that last one might be.  I can say with utmost certainty that he's as expert as expert gets in the department of remaining faithful to all of these ideals as faithfully as is functionally possible.

2) ChrisJ (not sure of your full name)
I only know ChrisJ through his posts on various forums and a few mp3's I've heard via an online collaboration project.  We all at times find ourselves trying odd/new/off-the-wall/"different" techniques at times to get the desired result out of our, albeit expensive or fancy, limited equipment...sometimes with and sometimes without success.  I dig ChrisJ's work because he doesn't let that get in the way...breaking right through that wall of limitation by writing up his own processors...sometimes just to see if the resulting processor might have some fruitful use down the road.  This willingness to experiment and push the boundaries of ability I find very admirable.

3 and 4) Brad Blackwood and Bob Olhsson
No, I'm not trying to kiss butt here...
Both Brad and Bob impress me immensely for their presence in this and other forums.  Their work is as top-notch as anyone's in my book, but it's this online presence that is what places them in my list of favorites.  Both Brad and Bob freely give of their time and knowledge to such an extent that it goes so far as not only educating, but also creating online environments that promote fruitful collaboration, discussion, and education.  To me this comes across as a dedication to this craft that goes well beyond the norm, and will with any luck lead to the continued preservation of this craft despite/in spite of the immense forces that purvey in this industry on the homefront: namely the promotional forces behind a myriad of new products making hugely innacurate claims to the throngs of new generations creating recorded music that threaten so many of our businesses on a constant basis.  For this, I not only put them on my list, but also thank them: Thank you.

Cheers,
Chris
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