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Author Topic: The Great Mixing Dilemma  (Read 20886 times)

maxim

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Re: The Great Mixing Dilemma
« Reply #45 on: March 31, 2005, 04:18:55 pm »

terry wroye:

"So the question becomes, is our vision, which is only achievable by mixing our own tracked and produced music ourselves, the best and correct presentation of that music to "the world" in general, or is it merely the closest thing to our own mental image of it? This may not be answerable. "

i guess, there's never one "right" version in art

as an artist/producer, i'm far too paranoid to hand over my "vision" to someone else

i'd rather screw it up and learn from my mistake, than hand it over to someone else

there are so many intuitive processes that go into creating a piece, that i feel, unless i'm sure that the other person is on my wavelength, they would miss the point

having said that, two minds can be better than one

but, too many cooks spoil the broth

and stitch in time saves nine

also, rolling stones gather no (ian) moss

etcetera etcetera

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compasspnt

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Re: The Great Mixing Dilemma
« Reply #46 on: March 31, 2005, 06:13:04 pm »

maxim wrote on Thu, 31 March 2005 16:18

...there are so many intuitive processes that go into creating a piece, that i feel, unless i'm sure that the other person is on my wavelength, they would miss the point

having said that, two minds can be better than one

but, too many cooks spoil the broth

and stitch in time saves nine

also, rolling stones gather no (ian) moss

etcetera etcetera




You may have a valid point here, but you have forgotten that...


...a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush!
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Kennyd03

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Re: The Great Mixing Dilemma
« Reply #47 on: March 31, 2005, 06:36:38 pm »

J.J. wrote on Thu, 31 March 2005 07:52

I remember a session, that thank god I was not engineering, where the A&R guy I knew very well was sitting there, and  while the band was tracking he started complaining to the engineer about the lack of low end.  Not only was the A&R guy a completely talentless poseur who had no business having that job, it never occurred to him that it could have been: A) the location of the room where he was sitting B) the particular mix that the engineer wanted to hear  C) none of his fucking business, so he should just shut up and not tell the professionals how to do their job.

Imagine if he had been there for mixing!


Hey J.J. - I think we've all been there to some degree or another. Thus the "people management" task, which is really such a huge part of the job, comes into play. It seems like most successful engineers are good "people" people and can navigate their way through minefields like the situation above. That's one thing not taught in a lot of recording schools.

I personally like the challenge of recording -- knowing that someone else is going to mix it. When doing this, I have the goal of inspiring the mixing engineer, once he hears the basic tracks, realizing that he/she doesn't have to spend time slogging through "fixes," and having creative sounds to work with.

-KD03
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maxim

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Re: The Great Mixing Dilemma
« Reply #48 on: March 31, 2005, 10:33:17 pm »

terry wrote:

"...a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush! "

yes, but how much would you give to have bush in your hand?

especially, if you were allowed to squeeze very very hard
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stevieeastend

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Re: The Great Mixing Dilemma
« Reply #49 on: March 31, 2005, 11:37:38 pm »

maxim wrote on Thu, 31 March 2005 22:18

terry wroye:


there are so many intuitive processes that go into creating a piece, that i feel, unless i'm sure that the other person is on my wavelength, they would miss the point






There are two interesting point in this one. Firstly it reminds me that my best mixes are almost always the ones when  I mix during arranging.  These "intuitive" mixes, where you not really put the whole concentration on a particualar mixing issue like "now let?s mult the drums off and do the parallel compression thing etc.." are for some reasons my best ones.  
They almost always got that certain something in comparison to the strictly "brain-driven" mixes.
The mistake I almost always do in mixing is to overdo things. I would try two compressor just because I think it might be a cool thing to do. During an "intuitive" mix I only would grab for the second compressor when I would get the "feeling" it?s really necessary. I would then rather avoid things, which I would have done just for "gear-"sake" or "I am the best technical mixer in the world-thing". An intutitive mix  keeps the vibe of the songs, usually includes a couple of technical mixing mistakes but never sound that blown up or artifical as a "brain-driven" one in my case.
JJ, is this the reason why you don?t like the mixes of JJP? And maybe that?s the reason why the mixes of CLA, and Bob Clearmountain are that great? I read that they mix very fast and it usually take them only a couple of hours. By doing so you cannot be too picky about any detail despite of their great knowledge and experience.
Sorry when this sounds a little vague but I will think about  some better examples and arguments about that....

And for "one-vision-mixers-goal" I think that in my case I am glad that nobody else got my visions.
It would be scary to have someone else around doing the same thing and the greatest danger to my business as well, I guess. So I think it is simply not possible to be 1000% satisified when someone else mixes your stuff. But is this really necessary?  

Artists, A&Rs and cosumers are so used to a certain, modern sound that a specialist usually should help to bring the arrangements, sound design etc.the producer and arranger have created to the next level. He should bring in fresh ideas, listen to my "visions-mix" and should be aware of how to achieve a certain style in a technical way. Besides that he shouldn?t cost too much ....Wink.... asking too much?

cheers
steveeastend

maxim

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Re: The Great Mixing Dilemma
« Reply #50 on: April 01, 2005, 01:33:45 am »

i think it's the right v left hemisphere issue
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