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Author Topic: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out  (Read 56196 times)

vernier

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Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
« Reply #75 on: March 27, 2005, 03:05:33 pm »

Almost forgot! ..Bohemian Rhapsody (Night at the Opera) ..Roy Baker's last album with Queen.
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J.J. Blair

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Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
« Reply #76 on: March 27, 2005, 08:43:51 pm »

You  know, I hate to pick something so obvious, but the production on Hendrix's version of "All Along the Watchtower", is just simply one of the greatest rock recordings ever.  From the 12-string acoustics to the vibroslap to the tambourine to the layers of electrics, it just kills me.  Not to mention, it might be my favorite Hendrix solo.

I first heard the song when I was 13 and it was a revelation.  I mean, I dropped everything to listen.  I couldn't believe what I was hearing.

The Moody Blues' Days of Future Past just happened on my random iTunes.  I can't believe how well recorded that album is.  Those sounds are magnificent, from the orchestra down to the sound of the verb.
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They say the heart of Rock & Roll is still beating, which is amazing if you consider all the blow it's done over the years.

"The Internet enables pompous blowhards to interact with other pompous blowhards in a big circle jerk of pomposity." - Bill Maher

"The negative aspects of this business, not only will continue to prevail, but will continue to accelerate in madness. Conditions aren't going to get better, because the economics of rock and roll are getting closer and closer to the economics of Big Business America." - Bill Graham

senorsmoke

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Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
« Reply #77 on: March 27, 2005, 10:09:26 pm »

hi all..first post
well being from Detroit I am partial to any of the GREAT Motown records by Marvin Gaye..."Stubborn Kinda Fellow", "Pride and Joy" , "Hitchhike" and the lesser known "One More Heartache"...great distorted maracas. The use of the reverb on these records is so powerful... the shuffling rhythm section and cries of pure soul. Magic.
I don't think it's an exaggeration to say musically and sonically Stax, Motown, Atlantic etc are a far cry from anything heard today.
There's just too much music to list from the past that is absolutely stunning.

Also, I believe the Lee Dorsey record above has the Meters as the rhythm section...untouchable. Check out "Who's gonna Help a Brother Get Further"...bet you could spin that one a hundred times.
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compasspnt

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Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
« Reply #78 on: March 27, 2005, 10:54:49 pm »

senorsmoke wrote on Sun, 27 March 2005 22:09

hi all..first post


Welcome George!

Quote:


I don't think it's an exaggeration to say musically and sonically Stax, Motown, Atlantic etc are a far cry from anything heard today.
There's just too much music to list from the past that is absolutely stunning.


How right you are, for the most part!

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Curve Dominant

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Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
« Reply #79 on: March 27, 2005, 11:43:59 pm »

These recordings blew my child's mind, captured my imagination, and thus helped send me on this mad path to this day:

1) "Shaft Theme," Issac Hayes.
2) "Tobacco Road," Edgar Winter
3) "Nutbush City Limits," Ike & Tina Turner
4) "Destitute & Losin'" Grand Funk Railroad
5) "Keep On Truckin'" Eddie Kendrix
6) "Space Oddity," David Bowie
7) "Autobahn," Kraftwerk
8 ) "Good Vibrations," The Beach Boys
9) "ABC" The Jackson Five
10) "Fat Albert & The Cosby Kids Theme"

horowizard

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Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
« Reply #80 on: March 28, 2005, 12:56:15 am »

Radd 47 wrote on Thu, 10 March 2005 00:21


Then there's the "I Can Hear the Grass Grow" by the Move.  Can't beat that bass line.




I saw Roy Wood's Big Band when they played the Village Underground a couple of years ago.  That's a dropped 'D' tuning on the guitar and probably the bass for that recording.

I'd have to say that SHAZAM! by The Move is a stand out masterpiece of psychedelic heavy rock.  You never heard drums sound so huge, even that late into the 60s.
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uk03878

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Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
« Reply #81 on: April 01, 2005, 08:06:46 am »

Joe Meek recording the Honeycombs foot stomping - "Have I the Right" - idea then nicked by the Dave Clark Five
Done in his recording studio - aka a flat above a shop in Archway, "Norf" London
The foot stomping is actually - foot stomping on the wooden floorboards


The cliched gated snare sound - I despise it - and all came about because of actually having a vicious talkback compressor on the SSL desk - with Hugh Padgham accidentally pressing the talkback button with a Phil Collins Drum Track playback on a Peter Gabriel song... lo and behold - the 1980s gimmick was born


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Bob Olhsson

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Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
« Reply #82 on: April 01, 2005, 08:26:21 am »

uk03878 wrote on Fri, 01 April 2005 07:06

Joe Meek recording the Honeycombs foot stomping - "Have I the Right" - idea then nicked by the Dave Clark Five...
Meek, of course, had nicked the idea from Bob Crewe who had used foot stomps on the Four Seasons records. A lot of the Motown sound traces back to Crewe's influence. The most famous record I ever recorded foot stomps for was Edwin Starr's "War." I'll never forget the sight of Norman Whitfield, a large man, stomping on the sheet of plywood that we kept around for the purpose.

compasspnt

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Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
« Reply #83 on: April 01, 2005, 09:46:12 am »

Bob Olhsson wrote on Fri, 01 April 2005 08:26

uk03878 wrote on Fri, 01 April 2005 07:06

Joe Meek recording the Honeycombs foot stomping - "Have I the Right" - idea then nicked by the Dave Clark Five...
Meek, of course, had nicked the idea from Bob Crewe who had used foot stomps on the Four Seasons records. A lot of the Motown sound traces back to Crewe's influence. ...


Bob,  I'm so glad you mentioned Bob Crewe.  I have intended for a couple of weeks now to mention him in this very thread.  A tremendous, quality recordist and influencer!
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J.J. Blair

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Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
« Reply #84 on: April 01, 2005, 11:34:06 am »

Aren't there also stomps on Starr's "Twenty-Five Miles from Home"?  That's my favorite of his Motown hits.
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studio info

They say the heart of Rock & Roll is still beating, which is amazing if you consider all the blow it's done over the years.

"The Internet enables pompous blowhards to interact with other pompous blowhards in a big circle jerk of pomposity." - Bill Maher

"The negative aspects of this business, not only will continue to prevail, but will continue to accelerate in madness. Conditions aren't going to get better, because the economics of rock and roll are getting closer and closer to the economics of Big Business America." - Bill Graham

Bob Olhsson

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Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
« Reply #85 on: April 02, 2005, 11:53:28 am »

Sure is. Same sheet of plywood, same determined look on Norman's face, and naturally a KM-86.

tarmadilo

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Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
« Reply #86 on: April 02, 2005, 12:19:53 pm »

Dan Kennedy wrote on Sat, 12 March 2005 18:28


Right now I'm listenning to "Steam Powered Aereoplane" by John Hartfrod, produced by David Bromberg.

Whatever happenned to Bromberg? Did the best up-tempo bluegrassy folky druggy shit ever...


He dropped out of the music business back in the late 80s and went to school to learn to build violins.  He still plays occasionally, but now his main gig is as owner of an amazing violin shop in Wilmington, Delaware.  Apparently he's considered THE expert on American-made violins (which he jokes is a dubious distinction!).

http://www.davidbromberg.net/home.html

Here's a cool article about his store:
http://www.out-and-about.com/article.php?articleID=102&p ageID=166&sequence=1

Strangely enough, he doesn't seem to have a website for the store!

Cheers, Tim (who sings "Sharon" with his band)

tarmadilo

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Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
« Reply #87 on: April 02, 2005, 12:26:10 pm »

I listened to a lot of albums late at night through a set of Pickering headphones back when I was a kid in the early 70s, here a few amazing sounding records that haven't been mentioned yet:

Simon and Garfunkle - Three amazing albums:
Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Tyme
Bookends
Bridge Over Troubled Water

Here's a great, somewhat obscure record:
Gene Clark - No Other

Cheers, Tim

vernier

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Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
« Reply #88 on: April 02, 2005, 02:57:12 pm »

Simon and Garfunkel were high quality ..Columbia too ..lots of tubes.

MCullen
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Consul

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Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
« Reply #89 on: April 02, 2005, 05:26:23 pm »

I was listening to some CDs today and happened to put in some Traffic. "Empty Pages" is a great song, with great engineering and production all around. I did some hunting around on the web and found out that Andy Johns was involved in that record (John Barleycorn Must Die). No wonder it sounds good. Smile
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Darren Landrum

"Never be afraid to try something new. Remember that a lone amateur built the Ark. A large group of professionals built the Titanic." - Dave Barry
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