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Author Topic: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out  (Read 66201 times)

Lee Flier

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Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
« Reply #45 on: March 10, 2005, 09:58:34 PM »

Great to see so many Nazz fans!  I think "Under the Ice" is my favorite of theirs, just cuz of the killer drumming!

WhyKooper

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Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
« Reply #46 on: March 10, 2005, 10:15:28 PM »

And "Forget All About It" was cool.  I still have that Nazz Nazz see-through pink vinyl lp.  I like most of the songs on it but I've never thought the album was engineered very well.  "Open My Eyes" was really cool from the previous album.  I like it's major tape flange effect.

Ah..but for Nazz, they were ahead of the game with "Loosen Up".  When they start mangling the song, it's priceless.  I still roll on the floor laughing whenever I hear it.  "Hi everybody, we're the Nazz from Philadelphia...home of the tuna fish hoagie".
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MB

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Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
« Reply #47 on: March 10, 2005, 11:33:41 PM »

Anybody know anything about this girl group, The Feminine Complex?

http://www.cherryred.co.uk/revola/artists/femininecrrev66.ht m

Recorded one record in Nashville in 1969 then nothing else.

They're a recent discovery for me and I must say it's astoundingly improbable music. Like a psychedelic garage band fronted by Shirley Bassey as played by top Nashville sessioneers. Sounds very now. I'm sure Tarantino is a fan.
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thedoc

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Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
« Reply #48 on: March 11, 2005, 12:44:08 AM »

The Story In Your Eyes...Moody Blues.
Would love to know where and how that was recorded....

Hello...Tony Clarke?
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Doc

WhyKooper

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Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
« Reply #49 on: March 11, 2005, 08:12:01 AM »

Tony Clarke sometimes talks about this stuff on Mike Pinder's site.
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Radd 47

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Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
« Reply #50 on: March 11, 2005, 02:25:56 PM »

Well I'll be gosh darn. I pull out my Little Feat vinyl to listen to Fat Man in the Bathtub for old time's sake and low and behold:

Recorded by: George Massenburg on a helios mobile

Mastered by: Bill Robinson at Sunset Studios.

You just never know who ya might meet around this place!

I thought of a couple of more classics,

"Long Cool Woman" by  The Hollies and

"Woodstock" by CSN&Y

BTW, Someone drove that Helios off a cliff somewhere.
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sharp11

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Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
« Reply #51 on: March 11, 2005, 09:48:47 PM »

How about the early Elton John records, from say, 1971 (the madman LP), up through 1975 (Captain Fantastic)

These records have wonderful sonic attributes as well as great songs and musicianship. They just sound so fat.

Marvin Gaye's masterpiece from 1971, What's Going On

The Yes Fragile, I can remember sitting in my bedroom as a 14 year old one cold and snowy Saturday in february of 1972 just marveling at the sound of Bruford's snare drum (and all the rest of it).

I also think Joni Mitchell's records from 1973 through 1978 are stunning sonically, that would be Court& Spark, Hissing Of Summer Lawns, Hejira, and Don Juan's Reckless Daughter.

I remember George Benson's 1976 Breezin' lp excited a lot of us at Berklee College of Music at the time.

Stevie Wonder's 1979 Power Of Love was a big step up sonically.

Chicago 6 and 7 are fantastic soundind records (even if 5 is perhaps their all time best). They were cut at Carabuo in 1973 and 74.

I can recall a distinctive change in the way records sounded broken down by the following eras I've lived through, roughly:

Around 1965 with Rubber Soul one starts hearing more bass drum and a "richer" sounding bass.

Late 60's, with the advent of volume, records (some) get louder.

Early 70's; you really begin noticing a deadness and isolation cropping up.

By 1983/84, things really change as ambience and the now cliche gated snare make their appearances.

Then it's the sampling and computerized plug-ins generation, where nothing can be allowed to pass through that sounds normal; a drum set must sound like a box of tissues and a box of tissues must be sampled and reconstituted as a guitar and.......well, you get the idea.
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wwittman

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Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
« Reply #52 on: March 11, 2005, 10:56:23 PM »

I don't know WHY I think so, but I could swear I remember that The Music Machine record was recorded by Paul Buff (later of Allison Research)

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William Wittman
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(Cyndi Lauper, Joan Osborne, The Fixx, The Outfield, Hooters...)

JGreenslade

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Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
« Reply #53 on: March 12, 2005, 12:02:20 PM »

This is an obvious example, but it surprises me that there seems to be so little info in the public domain relating to Norman Whitfield's studio techniques - particularly those employed on the Temptations, and latterly his own label productions. His use of space on the extended mix of "Runaway child, running wild" blows me away, and most of the productions he was involved with around the late '60s / early '70s sound highly futuristic even by today's standards, with some incredible subtle production touches.

Consul: I believe (may be wrong, I know several Rafferty tracks were made there) the Gerry Rafferty track you refer to was recorded and mixed at Audio International London, in which case it would've been mixed on a unique hybrid Neve / Cadac desk which was personally tweaked by both RN and Clive Green.

Justin
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Bob Olhsson

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Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
« Reply #54 on: March 12, 2005, 12:21:47 PM »

thermionic wrote on Sat, 12 March 2005 11:02

This is an obvious example, but it surprises me that there seems to be so little info in the public domain relating to Norman Whitfield's studio techniques - particularly those employed on the Temptations, and latterly his own label productions...

I worked with Norman a lot during that period although the main engineer was Orson Lewis who had come to us from Media Sound with a recommendation from Valerie Simpson.

Norman had originally worked with and learned from Brian Holland. After the Hollands, engineer Lawrence Horn and Lamont Dozier left, he inherited the next generation of Motown engineers. Our new boss, Cal Harris, had been hired away from Gold Star and it turns out had interned with Chuck Britz on the Beach Boys. Cal, Joe Atkinson from Atlantic, someone whose name I forget from Chicago and Steve Smith who had worked at Stax reinvented Motown engineering. Larry Miles and I got moved out of the mastering room and into the studio. We were the luckiest people in the world to learn from and be a part of this amazing studio team.

JGreenslade

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Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
« Reply #55 on: March 12, 2005, 12:42:12 PM »

Quote:


We were the luckiest people in the world to learn from and be a part of this amazing studio team.



You can say that again! From a technical standpoint, that period between the mid '60s and when the disco sound started to emerge in Whitfiled's production during the '70s constitutes a sonic standard I've yet to see bettered. There were so many deft "touches" in the records.

I guess there could be a curious "parallel" with Stevie Wonder and Whitfield's production - Wonder proved one person could take the place of a whole orchestra, which few could emulate (Bob O. has an interview somewhere on the PSW server talking about this), and influenced the "jack of all trades" syndrome that followed in less capable musicians. Similarly, Whitfield's later productions were pretty near the threshold of "over production", and he proved you could throw hundreds of ideas and touches at an arrangment and it could still gel - today we hear mixes made on DAWs that are pure "ideas and touches", lacking in terms of overall flow and crucially, source material.

I hope the above analogy makes sense!

Justin    
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Bob Olhsson

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Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
« Reply #56 on: March 12, 2005, 12:55:51 PM »

thermionic wrote on Sat, 12 March 2005 11:42

...I guess there could be a curious "parallel" with Stevie Wonder and Whitfield's production  
It wasn't uncommon to do Norman's session in the morning, Stevie's in the afternoon and Rare Earth at night the same day. We had engineering shifts and worked with everybody. Every single one of us was standing on our mentors' and on each other's shoulders.

JGreenslade

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Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
« Reply #57 on: March 12, 2005, 03:40:02 PM »

Bob Olhsson wrote on Sat, 12 March 2005 17:55

It wasn't uncommon to do Norman's session in the morning, Stevie's in the afternoon and Rare Earth at night the same day. We had engineering shifts and worked with everybody. Every single one of us was standing on our mentors' and on each other's shoulders.


As I've commented before, you'll have to reserve me a copy should you decide to write a book!

Cheers,
Justin
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Audio is a vocational affliction

"there is no "homeopathic" effect in bits and bytes." - HansP

Dan Kennedy

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Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
« Reply #58 on: March 12, 2005, 06:28:13 PM »

I still think "Tumbleweed Connections" is the best EJ album ever.

Another guy, who reached moderate success but was ahead of the curve and used the same team was Shawn Phillips.

Right now I'm listenning to "Steam Powered Aereoplane" by John Hartfrod, produced by David Bromberg.

Whatever happenned to Bromberg? Did the best up-tempo bluegrassy folky druggy shit ever...
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Strummer

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Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
« Reply #59 on: March 12, 2005, 09:42:21 PM »

Listening to analog stuff tonight, a couple of things not obscure, but incredible....

From my 70's living in L.A. period:

I've decided that anything Ken Scott did is great, listened to Crime of the Century and Crisis What Crisis by Supertramp, wonderful sounds, talented people.

The Tubes album with What Do You Want From Life is amazing.

"Bad Girls" by the Naughty Sweeties.

I love my turntable.


"I have traveled the world and I've never seen a statue of a critic"
Leonard Bernstein
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