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Author Topic: Marking Gear  (Read 1406 times)

arconaut

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Marking Gear
« on: February 08, 2005, 08:57:32 PM »

Hello everyone,

This is a dopey question, but I'm going to ask anyhow.

I recently took a job at a school's audio recording department and I need to "brand" the mics and gear as a theft deterrent (or maybe theives don't care). The idea of an etcher has crossed my mind, but that seems like bad news for a microphone (like a Brauner). Then, I could do a stencil, but what sort of paint or marker could I use? Sharpie makes something called the "permanent paint" marker,  which claims to be abraision-proof. Or maybe there's a sticker that is impossible to remove?

Does anybody have any experience with this sort of thing? I don't want to ruin anything.


Thanks, as always.

Noah
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Jakob Erland

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Re: Marking Gear
« Reply #1 on: February 09, 2005, 03:56:22 AM »

Permanently marking equipment will always reduce it's resale value - but isn't that exactly the point here..?

Having the stuff engraved would be the most sensible thing to do, IMHO, as this is hardest to remove.

And even though resale value will be a bit reduced, no use-value should be lost this way..

Jakob E.
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Fletcher

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Re: Marking Gear
« Reply #2 on: February 09, 2005, 05:19:34 PM »

Etching into the equipment does NOT reduce it's resale value... in some cases it actually increases the resale value [I know I covet my "Media Sound" M-269c not only because it's one of the best sounding mics in my world but because it has the "Media Sound" engraving on the body of the mic].

What I will say is practice with the engraving tool so when you do etch the numbers/name into the equipment it doesn't look like it was done by a retarded 6 yr. old.  If your school has a visual art department recruit an art student to do the etching... someone with hand eye co-ordination... an aspiring 'tattoo artist' is the kind of person you're looking to employ for the task.

Having dealt with all kinds of thieves in my business I can tell you with fairly good authority that any kind of "marker" is not permanent... nor are "bar code" plaques... the only thing that is permanent is to engrave the facility name and/or facilty serial number into the unit.

Best of luck with it.
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CN Fletcher

mwagener wrote on Sat, 11 September 2004 14:33
We are selling emotions, there are no emotions in a grid


"Recording engineers are an arrogant bunch.  
If you've spent most of your life with a few thousand dollars worth of musicians in the studio, making a decision every second and a half... and you and  they are going to have to live with it for the rest of your lives, you'll get pretty arrogant too.  It takes a certain amount of balls to do that... something around three"
Malcolm Chisholm

arconaut

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Re: Marking Gear
« Reply #3 on: February 09, 2005, 10:16:58 PM »


Fletcher,

How do you know I am not a "retarded" 6 year old?! Smile

I definitely plan to practice first.

Since we are a university (Fletcher, you just sold us a pair of 4038's), I'm not sure anybody here gives a flying leap about resale value anyhow. Somehow I don't think anybody in the future will covet their NYU 414, but hey, you never know.

I was more worried that the vibrations from the etcher might jostle the innards of a mic too much, especially a ribbon. I would plan to wrap the mic in plastic while etching, so little metal particles don't go flying into the diaphragm.


Noah
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Fig

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Re: Marking Gear
« Reply #4 on: February 10, 2005, 05:38:08 PM »

Fletcher wrote on Wed, 09 February 2005 16:19

Etching into the equipment does NOT reduce it's resale value... in some cases it actually increases the resale value [I know I covet my "Media Sound" M-269c not only because it's one of the best sounding mics in my world but because it has the "Media Sound" engraving on the body of the mic].


Yeah, my Eventide Instant Phaser from the Hit Factory, New York just doubled in value (or it will in due time).

I remember using the old Chess Studios U47s a long time ago at a studio that was not Chess.  They were considered the cat's meow at the time.

Who knows who is gonna come out of your institution so... it may well build value in the devices after some famous alumni leaves your hallowed halls.  Imagine later students saying, wow, this is the one that SHE used - or whatever.

Gotta agree, though, etched into the paint job is THE most permanent.  Stickers come off and topical markings can be removed or obscured.

Good luck,

Thom "Fig" Fiegle
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