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Author Topic: mercenary drawmer 1968  (Read 2625 times)

jdier

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mercenary drawmer 1968
« on: April 09, 2015, 10:08:29 pm »

Wondering if anyone has opinions on this unit as a 2 bus compressor.

My only other choice for 2 bus is my Daking III.

wondering if this would be up to the task, or better suited for drum bus or other duties.
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Jim Dier - Home Recordist

Almost everything I have recorded is here: R. Mutt and DW

I blog some here: Jim's Sound Lab

Tim Halligan

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Re: mercenary drawmer 1968
« Reply #1 on: April 09, 2015, 10:52:52 pm »

Equipment doesn't know or care what you put through it.

What matters is if you think it works in a given application.

Sometimes using a tool in the "wrong" application leads to something cool.

Try it and see.

Cheers,
Tim
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An analogue brain in a digital world.

jdier

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Re: mercenary drawmer 1968
« Reply #2 on: April 10, 2015, 12:32:19 am »

do not own it yet.  unable to test drive.  but agree with your sentiment.
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Jim Dier - Home Recordist

Almost everything I have recorded is here: R. Mutt and DW

I blog some here: Jim's Sound Lab

Fletcher

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Re: mercenary drawmer 1968
« Reply #3 on: April 10, 2015, 08:52:07 am »

Well... ya kinda came to the right place.  The 1968 was a version of the 1969 without the microphone amplifier section... and the 1969 was designed to my "specifications", for my sense of aesthetic [in a previous life, I used to run Mercenary Audio].

As a "drum buss" compressor its a pretty bad assed box.  Between the "attack" and "release" functions [along with the "hi-pass filter" on the "detector side chain"] you can get some very explosive drums that don't have that kinda signature "haze" that I hear on way too many recordings.

The "time constants" on the "attack" and "release" were the part where the greatest amount of tweezing time was spent.  On the "attack" side the time constants go from short to long over 6 different settings... on the "release" side the time constants are split into two sections... 1 is fast, 2 - medium, 3 - longish... 4, 5, & 6 are kinda the same but they're "program dependent" which I find can work really nicely for 2 buss work... for drum buss applications I prefer release options 1, 2, or 3.

The switchable "hi-pass filter" on the "detector" circuit [the part of a compressor that tells the actual compression amplifier just how much to turn down the volume] is there to keep things like the kik drum from modulating the compression.  This is an especially good feature for 2 buss work as it helps you keep the overall compression signature from sounding like the music is breathing around each kik hit so the compressor can focus on what is usually the next loudest element of a mix -- the vocals.

If you decide to give the unit an audition the starting point I would recommend for program material [2 buss] is attack 4, release 4 with the "big" [detector hi-pass filter] engaged... for drum buss work, attack =4, release =1 and again, with the "big" switch engaged.

Whether any of this will suit your sense of aesthetic for the music you're working on is going to be very much up to you and the production team... for my work... well, the box was built for the things I like to hear in my work so obviously the '68 was a favorite in my arsenal.

Hope this is of some assistance.

Peace
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CN Fletcher

mwagener wrote on Sat, 11 September 2004 14:33
We are selling emotions, there are no emotions in a grid


"Recording engineers are an arrogant bunch
If you've spent most of your life with a few thousand dollars worth of musicians in the studio, making a decision every second and a half... and you and  they are going to have to live with it for the rest of your lives, you'll get pretty arrogant too.  It takes a certain amount of balls to do that... something around three"
Malcolm Chisholm

jdier

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Re: mercenary drawmer 1968
« Reply #4 on: April 14, 2015, 01:31:49 pm »

Well... I kind of knew this was the right place.

Fletcher, as always, thanks for taking the time and and sharing your thoughts.

Really appreciated.
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Jim Dier - Home Recordist

Almost everything I have recorded is here: R. Mutt and DW

I blog some here: Jim's Sound Lab

Fletcher

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Re: mercenary drawmer 1968
« Reply #5 on: April 15, 2015, 10:02:39 am »

While I have zero affiliation with Drawmer these days... the 1968 is [at least in my twisted opinion] a pretty bad assed unit and definitely worth a drive around the block. 

I hope you find the tool you're looking for... whether it be the '68 or something else.

Peace
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CN Fletcher

mwagener wrote on Sat, 11 September 2004 14:33
We are selling emotions, there are no emotions in a grid


"Recording engineers are an arrogant bunch
If you've spent most of your life with a few thousand dollars worth of musicians in the studio, making a decision every second and a half... and you and  they are going to have to live with it for the rest of your lives, you'll get pretty arrogant too.  It takes a certain amount of balls to do that... something around three"
Malcolm Chisholm
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