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Author Topic: Master Bus in RED  (Read 1586 times)

Limonatus

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Master Bus in RED
« on: February 18, 2014, 02:09:48 pm »

In your opinion-there are differences between put down master bus track in PT and/or put down individual tracks in the session when master bus is overgaining? I usually put down master from 0db to -8dB/-9dB... whats is better in your opinion?
FC
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Fletcher

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Re: Master Bus in RED
« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2014, 07:30:14 am »

To quote my dear friend Terry Manning -- "Yellow is the new Red".  I've found the headroom in Pro-sTools to be a bit marginal so whenever I run that program my levels barely tickle the yellow on the individual tracks.  From there, I will often let my master 2 buss live in the yellow -- but never seeing the red. 

From time to time there may be a need to trim the master fader in PT... but for the most part... if I can avoid pulling the master -- I do.

I hope this is of some assistance.

Peace
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CN Fletcher

mwagener wrote on Sat, 11 September 2004 14:33
We are selling emotions, there are no emotions in a grid


"Recording engineers are an arrogant bunch
If you've spent most of your life with a few thousand dollars worth of musicians in the studio, making a decision every second and a half... and you and  they are going to have to live with it for the rest of your lives, you'll get pretty arrogant too.  It takes a certain amount of balls to do that... something around three"
Malcolm Chisholm

Limonatus

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Re: Master Bus in RED
« Reply #2 on: February 21, 2014, 05:51:22 pm »

Terry Manning rules- sometimes is inevitable that snare after some channel strip hit the compressor and give saturation and red so modern snare sound is given by this. Sometimes my singular tracks...like vox ,snare and kick are in red
(Processing give reds-recorded with good levels-so no reds...)so my master fader give reds so i need to put it down... or trim it...
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Fletcher

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Re: Master Bus in RED
« Reply #3 on: February 22, 2014, 11:15:49 am »

When I first used digital audio recorders [16 bit] it wasn't a bad idea to get the levels as high as possible as the resolution in the lower level areas didn't seem to be as clear and full sounding.  When 24 bit recording became the standard I found it was quite acceptable to back off on the levels going to the recorder.

The thing that really opened my eyes was the first time I recorded to an analog 24 track and transferred the audio to the digital domain simultaneously [the audio was "on tape" for a total of about 3"... the transfer to digital came directly off the repro head with no rewinding necessary].

I grew up recording to 2" tape... and over the years I knew and understood how to work the character of different tape formulations to my advantage.  The level to which you send the audio to tape is of paramount importance as how you "hit" the tape would alter the sonic characteristics of the sound you just recorded.

When I did this "live transfer" session I recorded to tape as I would have normally recorded to tape back in the 80's - 90's when that medium was all I would employ.  What I found exceptionally interesting was that the levels that I sent to the tape machine were FAR lower than the levels I had previously sent to the digital recorder... which was what led to my conclusion that backing off the level to the recorder really wasn't a bad thing. 

Yes, I know about sending the snare drum into a digital recorder so you register a couple of samples that hit into "digital distortion" which can actually be a "plus" to the instrument... but that's about the only place where it can be a bonus.  Most of the time I have found that the input electronic [analog] on the front end of analog to digital conversion devices don't want to see too much level lest they add their own distortions [usually odd order harmonic] that aren't all that musically engaging [at least to us westerners with our archaic 12 note scale].

Peace
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CN Fletcher

mwagener wrote on Sat, 11 September 2004 14:33
We are selling emotions, there are no emotions in a grid


"Recording engineers are an arrogant bunch
If you've spent most of your life with a few thousand dollars worth of musicians in the studio, making a decision every second and a half... and you and  they are going to have to live with it for the rest of your lives, you'll get pretty arrogant too.  It takes a certain amount of balls to do that... something around three"
Malcolm Chisholm
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