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Author Topic: Advertising  (Read 2942 times)

MaxC

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Advertising
« on: September 25, 2012, 10:30:59 pm »

Hey all,
Thinking about putting an add in Tape Op. Anyone ever run an ad in there? Or another publication? How Did it work out?

Best.
Max

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John Scrip - MASSIVE Mastering

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Re: Advertising
« Reply #1 on: September 25, 2012, 10:49:19 pm »

I ran in TO for a couple years, a few genre-specific rags here and there... 

I think in 4 or 5 years of magazine ads, I had ONE client say "I think I found your name in Tape Op" -- That's it. 

Don't even get me started about 8oo8|3 4d w0rd5... 
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John Scrip - MASSIVE Mastering

MaxC

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Re: Advertising
« Reply #2 on: September 25, 2012, 11:28:35 pm »

Well thats not what I wanted to hear!
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lowland

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Re: Advertising
« Reply #3 on: September 26, 2012, 03:18:56 am »

I would save your money Max. IME advertising has little impact in mastering, it's more about word of mouth and referrals. There's no substitute for a slow build of one's skillset and customer base - those clients who like what you do will tell others, that's worth far more to you than any ad.
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Nigel Palmer
Lowland Masters
www.lowlandmasters.com

Thomas W. Bethel

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Re: Advertising
« Reply #4 on: September 26, 2012, 08:20:03 am »

I have tried direct mail advertising, I have tried Radio and TV advertising, I have tried glossy magazine advertising, I have tried newspaper advertising and so far the best and most effective, and least costly, is word of mouth.

I would stick with doing a great job for everyone and let your clients be your advertising.
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Thomas W. Bethel
Managing Director
Acoustik Musik, Ltd.
http://www.acoustikmusik.com/

Doing what you love is freedom.
Loving what you do is happiness.

Celebrating 23 years in business in 2018

Rick Sutton

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Re: Advertising
« Reply #5 on: September 26, 2012, 12:01:03 pm »

 About 10 years ago I ran a monthly ad in Mix. All told I made some money but the cost of the ads ate up enough of the profit that I eventually pulled the plug.
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Twerk

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Re: Advertising
« Reply #6 on: September 26, 2012, 12:22:23 pm »

I think in this business, your best advertising is quality work. The rest seems to take care of itself.
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mmarra

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Re: Advertising
« Reply #7 on: September 27, 2012, 07:36:43 am »

I echo what the others are saying. Even though today more than ever it is easier to advertise, especially on the net, I still find referrals is what keeps me going.

I am, much like you, a relative fresh face in the mastering industry and when I first start I was advertising any where I can but I slowly found out that getting out there and meeting artists/bands/producers etc was the best way for me. Also funny enough my local craigslist ads where pretty good to me.
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Mike Marra (P.Eng)
João Carvalho Mastering
http://www.joaocarvalhomastering.com & http://elitemastering.com
Toronto, Canada

Ed Littman

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Re: Advertising
« Reply #8 on: September 27, 2012, 11:07:24 am »

I advertised in tapeop for a few years. it's good for industry exposure but not good for direct sales.
Ed

Allen Corneau

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Re: Advertising
« Reply #9 on: September 27, 2012, 08:11:54 pm »

Another senior member of our industry once said (on another forum) that he had placed ads in Mix magazine for years but he never, not once, had one of his clients pick him because of the ad in the mag.

That left a very strong message in my mind that I have never forgotten.
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Allen
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Allen Corneau Mastering
http://allencorneau.com/

KAyo

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Re: Advertising
« Reply #10 on: September 30, 2012, 07:15:28 am »

Mastering is all about taste, manner and technique, and no AD, could match that, as taste is an experience and a subjective reference.

What does the AD say to me, as a reader.

•   You say, you are good or great at your job: Good to know. But, I’ll make that call myself, on listening to your past and present work.
•   You have an awesome room, plus superior equipment: So do many of the top engineers or mastering houses. Not overly appealing.
•   You are cheaper than some: A helpful point, but, not to a serious muso. Not a valid enough reason, to change my perception of “worth”.
•   You are a nice guy to work with: Always a bonus, but still, not a clincher, as the majority of seasoned engineers have acquired a moderate level of customer service and people skills.
•   You are located conveniently: Helpful, but not enough to make one jump, as the web’s changed the game. Delivery is not a problem, both ways.
•   You are perceived as knowledgeable: Good for you, but, I am after stylization and taste (ears) in combination with knowledge.
•   You advertise everywhere and all the time: I have noticed, but, to me it means you lack business (why?) You await clientele; as you are new or not that well known for your work or just maybe, your reputation for mediocre precedes you etc.

One could go on and on, as the whole topic is steeped in subjective noise ..

As far as I am concerned, this is all about experience, reputation, trust and integrity.
If all of these went well the first time and the fifth time, then it’s near impossible for me to change at a flick of a want or need. Something big would have to fail me, for me to seek another champion “so to speak”..

The lesson here is, Master the audio to the best of your ability literally, but, also master the art of good and flexible business etiquette, one client at a time.

Sow your seeds of deeds from day one .. as affinity is magical and viscous by nature (word of mouth).

A personal observation only, no manual available.


Regards,
KAyo
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www.kantabiz.com
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Bill Philbrick

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Re: Advertising
« Reply #11 on: October 03, 2012, 01:12:09 pm »

Word of mouth is always the main support for your reputation and promotion.  Advertising is supplemental—IF you can afford it.


The main goal of print advertising is NOT direct sales.  The main goal is brand recognition.  Any direct sales from print ads is gravy.


If budget permits, you would plan on running ads consistently for a long period of time—possibly years.  The idea is for consumers to get used to seeing your company name and logo, even  if they don't consciously notice it.  Running just a few or sporadic ads would be a waste.


Then at a time when consumers are looking for a service you provide, if your name is mentioned the person thinks: "Yeah, I know that name, maybe I'll give them a call".


The real question is: would TO ads provide enough brand recognition among professionals (your consumers) to justify the expense?  Dubious, IMO.


If you think TO readers are a target market, your effort would be better spent formulating ideas for press releases to entice TO to run a story about you.


The old adage is apt:  Advertising, you pay for; Publicity, you pray for.


Caveat:  Having never dealt with TO, I don't know them or how they operate.  However, many publications won't even consider running a story unless you're a star or an advertiser.  Or spectacularly unique.


Direct mail is another strategy to augment promotion and would likely be surprisingly efficient, if done well.
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DarinK

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Re: Advertising
« Reply #12 on: October 03, 2012, 05:42:53 pm »

The real question is: would TO ads provide enough brand recognition among professionals (your consumers) to justify the expense?  Dubious, IMO.


If you think TO readers are a target market, your effort would be better spent formulating ideas for press releases to entice TO to run a story about you.


The old adage is apt:  Advertising, you pay for; Publicity, you pray for.


Caveat:  Having never dealt with TO, I don't know them or how they operate.  However, many publications won't even consider running a story unless you're a star or an advertiser.  Or spectacularly unique.

TapeOp do run differently from some of the other recording publications.  It's run more like a fanzine, where the stories are done based on what the writers/editors are actually interested in.  Most of their stories are not about "stars," and they don't run press releases or any of that sort of "news" that other mags do.  They only run feature articles and reviews.  Being an advertiser is not a requirement for a story; at least, it wasn't back when I worked at the publisher's studio, and the same folks are still in charge of the magazine.  Recording is a very small world, though, and I know the TO folks have gotten to be friends with some manufacturers, and that probably does have some impact. 
BTW, my only connection to TO is that I've met several of the folks and, years ago, worked at the publishers studio, including doing sessions for Larry Crane (the editor) before he ever started the magazine.
My opinion is that the advertising that has the best chance of success is either testimonials (by people whose work I respect) or client lists with folks I recognize.  It's the closest to word-of-mouth, and, especially in these days of downloads with no credits, can be helpful.
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