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Author Topic: wall treatments in high ceiling room  (Read 1919 times)

MoreSpaceEcho

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wall treatments in high ceiling room
« on: February 07, 2010, 01:17:05 pm »

hi all, a quick question for you...

i've just built myself a new mastering room, the dimensions are 21'3" x 16'10" x 13'4" (LWH). right now i am in that phase that i imagine lots of people go through, where the room isn't totally finished, but there are records to master, so i've got a temporary setup going, with all my absorbers scattered around the room, balanced precariously on mic stands and whatnot. it sounds pretty good in there and client response to the masters has been totally positive, so i'm happy so far. hopefully in a week or so it will be slow enough that i can take all the gear out, put in the hardwood floor, put all the absorbers up for real, and actually have a finished studio.

right now i have 8' high, 6" deep bass traps in all 4 corners, 3 4'x4" traps on the front wall behind the speakers, and then various 2" and 4" panels on the side walls, mostly towards the front of the room, there's a couple on the back wall as well. there's also a 6'x4' poly diffusor in the middle of the back wall, and i have a bunch of 703 on the ceiling in between the joists. standard stuff.

it sounds good, but at the moment it's still a little livelier than i would like...i can still hear a bit of the room when i clap my hands....i don't want it 'dead' but i think i do want it pretty 'dry', no?

so what i am wondering is...does anyone have any sort of suggestions or guidelines for where/how i should best arrange the absorbers on the walls? i'm familiar with the basics, and creating a RFZ, etc, but as the ceiling is 13 feet up, there is A LOT of wall space to consider. and it's mainly what to do with the upper parts of the walls that i'm not sure about.

should i worry more about the front/back walls or the sides? or both? or am i worrying about it too much already, and a couple panels *somewhere* higher up on the walls will work fine? i was also thinking about making a few more polys, and putting them higher up on the front/side walls...good/bad idea?

hhhmm...this is longer than i meant for it to be. sorry!

thank you,
scott
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Ethan Winer

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Re: wall treatments in high ceiling room
« Reply #1 on: February 08, 2010, 05:08:37 pm »

I was waiting for someone having more experience with high ceilings than me to chime in. While you wait for them to reply, I'll say that I'm pretty sure you'll want to treat those upper parts to avoid flutter echoes bouncing around audibly. You don't need 100 percent coverage of course! Maybe 20 to 30 percent?

--Ethan

MoreSpaceEcho

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Re: wall treatments in high ceiling room
« Reply #2 on: February 09, 2010, 02:37:50 am »

thanks ethan. i'm sure i need to do something with the upper parts of the walls, and since that will involve being up on the #$%^&* ladder again, i'd really like to do it right so i only have to do it once!
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franman

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Re: wall treatments in high ceiling room
« Reply #3 on: February 11, 2010, 10:27:57 pm »

I don't' know how it fits into your design scheme, but I would use the 'extra' ceiling height to create deep trapping in the ceilings possibly built into some soffits. This is a fairly typical element in our designs. There are any number of types of porous traps you can build in the 3-4ft of space you have (in corners built into soffits) including hanging baffles, filled porous, etc. The benefit is you create significant 'depth' of treatment to extend down into lower frequencies without exposing a lot more 'surface' that would soak up all the HF.

FM
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