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Author Topic: When to hit record  (Read 4989 times)

Groovr

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Re: When to hit record
« Reply #15 on: November 10, 2009, 06:29:14 PM »

Berolzheimer wrote on Wed, 11 November 2009 05:02

A.I.R.

Always in record.

Sometimes you'll catch a moment that's just perfect, and can never happen again or be recreated.  Almost missing some of those has honed my commitment to that philosophy.


When I'm working with an ensemble (nowhere near often enough in my little project studio ghetto) I'm in the habit of at least running a 2-track over the entire day.
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RSettee

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Re: When to hit record
« Reply #16 on: November 10, 2009, 06:42:46 PM »

I've missed some really good takes, by not hitting record in the beginning....the "warm up" ones often are the best, and then I kick myself for not pressing record on those. To me since then, there is no such thing as a "warm up" take, if people are running through the song, it deserves to be captured and then thrown away later, if need be.
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BrianS

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Re: When to hit record
« Reply #17 on: November 10, 2009, 11:09:30 PM »

If there's no click...I always hit record. Even when getting levels. It's easy to chose to undo or erase the track.

If the band wants to practice with click...I always hit record. Even if I'm getting levels. It's easy to chose undo or erase the track.

If we're going for takes, and there isn't a click, I always say...standby...we're rolling..If there is a click...I say standby...they know when we're rolling.
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Bob Olhsson

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Re: When to hit record
« Reply #18 on: November 11, 2009, 12:32:09 AM »

mdbeh wrote on Tue, 10 November 2009 12:16

Was the distortion on Motown vocals ever intentional?...
We'd have certainly preferred that it wasn't! Our home brew 8-track had very limited high frequency response on the outside tracks along with hum. For that reason we put the lead vocal on track 1 and the bass on track 8.  

The bass was recorded as hot as we could get away with so it would cover up the hum. The lead vocal was high-passed to get rid of the hum and then parallel-compressed with the highs boosted on the compressor return to give it presence. The return was also often run through a Fairchild Auto-Ten noise gate. It was a cool, if distorted effect. It sounded like crap with the 16 track machines so we stopped doing it around 1968.

ssltech

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Re: When to hit record
« Reply #19 on: November 11, 2009, 08:46:30 AM »

Quote:

When to hit record?


Several times spring to mind as to when might be a good time to tickle the red button, like if you want to be known as a recording studio, and not a rehearsal studio.

But the most honest reason, which serves everyone best is:

Whenever there's the SLIGHTEST chance that magic might happen.

Keith
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MDM (maxdimario) wrote on Fri, 16 November 2007 21:36

I have the feeling that I have more experience in my little finger than you do in your whole body about audio electronics..

Bill Mueller

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Re: When to hit record
« Reply #20 on: November 11, 2009, 09:11:53 AM »

The simple answer is to be in record when things happen. However, that can sometimes be not so simple, especially when taking into account reels of tape and such.

I have never lost a note in the studio, because when a new group of musicians is setting up, I go to great lengths to get us all on the same page about the recording process. I explain that I will put the system in record, and I tell them what specific language I will use to cue them. This is really only "director speak", and I acquired it from years on the road doing broadcast music programs. It doesn't matter what you say, only that everybody knows what you're going to say.

Occasionally I have worked with players working up pieces who wanted to keep tape rolling, but they knew how to move quickly between takes and not waste space on the tape. With hard drives, this is not an issue. Just put it in record and let it run.

Live, I have only lost a single song, but not due to my mistake, but due to an A2 who thought he knew better when I called "roll tape!". He thought I made the call too early and he delayed just long enough to miss the intro to an Aerosmith song! Arggg! I could have killed him! But the band was way cool and just acted like nothing happened.

Last summer Jonathan Burtner, Bill Urik and I did a live recording in Atlanta. We were only supposed to capture the fifth song of each artist, but some artists began moving their sets around and not telling us. So I decided to start making the roll tape call earlier. One act was adamant that she would tell us when to record. I knew she was going to screw it up, so I told the guys to roll during the previous song. Of course she forgot to look over and cue us to record until the drummer was actually playing the intro.

Bill
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Seb Riou

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Re: When to hit record
« Reply #21 on: November 11, 2009, 11:57:01 AM »

Usually right after telling the band : "Let's just do a warm up before record"
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mdbeh

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Re: When to hit record
« Reply #22 on: November 11, 2009, 12:08:00 PM »

Bob Olhsson wrote on Tue, 10 November 2009 23:32

mdbeh wrote on Tue, 10 November 2009 12:16

Was the distortion on Motown vocals ever intentional?...
The lead vocal was high-passed to get rid of the hum and then parallel-compressed with the highs boosted on the compressor return to give it presence. The return was also often run through a Fairchild Auto-Ten noise gate. It was a cool, if distorted effect.


Aha!  I never would have guessed that's how that effect was acheived, but it makes sense now.

Quote:

 It sounded like crap with the 16 track machines so we stopped doing it around 1968.


All of the examples I can think of are from the early years.

Thanks, Bob.

And now back to your regularly scheduled topic...

--Brian
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Bill Mueller

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Re: When to hit record
« Reply #23 on: November 11, 2009, 12:11:53 PM »

Bob Olhsson wrote on Wed, 11 November 2009 00:32

mdbeh wrote on Tue, 10 November 2009 12:16

Was the distortion on Motown vocals ever intentional?...
We'd have certainly preferred that it wasn't! Our home brew 8-track had very limited high frequency response on the outside tracks along with hum. For that reason we put the lead vocal on track 1 and the bass on track 8.  

The bass was recorded as hot as we could get away with so it would cover up the hum. The lead vocal was high-passed to get rid of the hum and then parallel-compressed with the highs boosted on the compressor return to give it presence. The return was also often run through a Fairchild Auto-Ten noise gate. It was a cool, if distorted effect. It sounded like crap with the 16 track machines so we stopped doing it around 1968.

Damn Bob,

I was sure I invented this technique for vocals! Is there nothing new under the sun?

Thanks for the explanation. For those who might have just skipped over this piece of genius, parallel compression with eq on a lead vocal, causes the soft passages to become brighter, making them easier to distinguish while louder passages do not have the eq (it is compressed down) and keeps them smoother and less harsh. Brilliant.

Best regards,

Bill
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“The Internet is only a means of communication,” he wrote. “It is not an amorphous extraterrestrial body with an entitlement to norms that run counter to the fundamental principles of human rights. There is nothing in the criminal or civil law which legalizes that which is otherwise illegal simply because the transaction takes place over the Internet.” Irish judge, Peter Charleton

CHANCE

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Re: When to hit record
« Reply #24 on: November 11, 2009, 01:42:09 PM »

Ever notice that when a group KNOWS they are recording, the levels go up from the sound check levels?
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rankus

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Re: When to hit record
« Reply #25 on: November 11, 2009, 02:07:08 PM »

Seb RIOU wrote on Wed, 11 November 2009 08:57

Usually right after telling the band : "Let's just do a warm up before record"



Me too.   I'll say "let's run a pass so I can set levels, I won't be recording".. often this is the best vocal take Wink

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Seb Riou

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Re: When to hit record
« Reply #26 on: November 11, 2009, 02:23:18 PM »

CHANCE wrote on Wed, 11 November 2009 19:42

Ever notice that when a group KNOWS they are recording, the levels go up from the sound check levels?


Yep, mostly with short or ill studio-experienced musicians. I guess tension adds some gain up Wink

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Ian Visible

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Re: When to hit record
« Reply #27 on: November 13, 2009, 08:52:04 AM »

Bill and Bob wrote similar things on separate occasions

...parallel compression with eq on a lead vocal, causes the soft passages to become brighter, making them easier to distinguish while louder passages do not have the eq (it is compressed down) and keeps them smoother and less harsh. Brilliant...


+1

Very brilliant indeed!

I've learned something new today.

My work here is done.

Thank you!
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