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Author Topic: them crooked vultures  (Read 12023 times)

Josh McArdle

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Re: them crooked vultures
« Reply #30 on: April 17, 2010, 10:57:08 am »

First time I put this record on I closed my eyes and it sounded like the band was right in front of me.

Sound like it's been squished...I think probably everything I don't like about this album is due to limiting. It's like playing hunt the snare sometimes...

Still, the sounds are amazing and the space and depth is f***ing awesome. Really good production and musicianship going on...I really like this album.  Smile
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typek

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Re: them crooked vultures
« Reply #31 on: April 20, 2010, 10:00:53 am »

Josh McArdle wrote on Sat, 17 April 2010 09:57



Sound like it's been squished...I think probably everything I don't like about this album is due to limiting. It's like playing hunt the snare sometimes...

Still, the sounds are amazing and the space and depth is f***ing awesome. Really good production and musicianship going on...I really like this album.  Smile



This seems a little contradictory. Sounds too squished... Yet has lots of space and depth?

Explain.
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dandigby

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Re: them crooked vultures
« Reply #32 on: April 20, 2010, 10:47:10 pm »

I'm not sure this is what Josh meant, but the 'space and depth' I love is more about the song arrangements, and how the sounds themselves have been recorded.  On a number of tracks on the album there's something distance miked, or has some of what mostly sounds like "real" ambience/effect captured in the recording.  It gives a great character, and those tracks save everything from being flat and in your face.  From the drums and bells opening of No-one loves me, the main riff guitar sounds in Elephants and Bandoliers... at least, thats the depth I enjoy on the album (as well as some great playing! Smile)

I saw the Vultures out here in Melbourne a while back, and it was an AWESOME show.  As per the other comments, Dave was definitely the highlight for me and his live sounds were pretty much what you expect to hear after the album (not sure, but a rack of Distressors looked to be his).  The rest of the band were also great, and being a QOTSA fan also it was sort of nice seeing Josh up front but not being 'the main guy'.

Best rock album and show I've heard for a long time.
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Josh McArdle

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Re: them crooked vultures
« Reply #33 on: April 21, 2010, 06:16:52 pm »

typek wrote on Tue, 20 April 2010 09:00

Josh McArdle wrote on Sat, 17 April 2010 09:57



Sound like it's been squished...I think probably everything I don't like about this album is due to limiting. It's like playing hunt the snare sometimes...

Still, the sounds are amazing and the space and depth is f***ing awesome. Really good production and musicianship going on...I really like this album.  Smile



This seems a little contradictory. Sounds too squished... Yet has lots of space and depth?

Explain.


Sorry, I didn't word that very well! In terms of space and depth I'm talking about ambience. I like that you can really hear the room and the positions of the instruments. The use of more ambient micing techniques makes a nice change from the real in your face sound that seems to dominate most modern rock records. Definitely the arrangements too, it's been cleverly put together.

What I mean by squished is that it sounds to me like things are being clamped down on a little hard. The snare in certain parts for example, but it doesn't exactly make me wrinkle my nose Razz
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mdbeh

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Re: them crooked vultures
« Reply #34 on: April 21, 2010, 08:50:33 pm »

To my ears, the drums are really well-balanced --  you hear the kit as a whole instead of as a collection of disembodied samples.  It doesn't have a super-loud, super-processed snare riding on top of everything, but that's a good thing to me.
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Brian Harper
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typek

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Re: them crooked vultures
« Reply #35 on: April 23, 2010, 08:30:37 am »

Ok, I get it. Yeah, I agree. One thing I love about this album is that everything has a nice sounding "room" to it. It is refreshing, compared to many of the close miked, sampled, real in your face huge sounding stuff. There is a place for that sound of course - but the sounds they used on the Them Crooked Vultures album fit perfectly.

And I also agree that it does sound a bit more squashed than I would have liked, dynamics wise.
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Devil's Rope Studios

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Re: them crooked vultures
« Reply #36 on: September 14, 2010, 06:33:03 pm »

Reg. sound quality - isn't the beauty of this album(besides the obvious) in the cool, old-school "roomy" sound it has? I hear exactly what you mean when you say its a little squashed but the first thing I noticed when I popped it in was the nod to that old-school sound. LOVE it!

Seb Riou

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Re: them crooked vultures
« Reply #37 on: October 12, 2010, 05:05:54 pm »

From the Q&A with Alan Moulder initiated by Bob Ebeling on Whatever Works Forum, the answer from the man himself :

Quote:



Grohl's Kick:  We did use a lot of room mics but they changed from song to song, every track had a different approach to the drum sound. I used a Beyer on the close kick (an M380 I think) and on quite a few a very old Altec mic that was big and heavy and had very little output level that was about 4 foot away and put through an Ampex mic pre which also had low level so I had to turn it up to a level it distorted on the input but we were trying to be creative! On some tracks we sent the kick out to a tiny amp that was pretty distorted. I used a lot of different room mics that helped with the decay of the kick too.... I think it may have been the sum of them all that resulted in the end product. In general, I don't have any specific tips with outside mics, I never measure distances or anything. I tend to get try and use something different as much as possible and if the studio has a mic that looks interesting I'll put it up and see what it sounds like, then move it around until it sounds good. The more bored I get, the more adventurous the mic placement!


Best.


Alan.
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