R/E/P Community

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

Pages: 1 [2] 3  All   Go Down

Author Topic: Electric guitar mics  (Read 6879 times)

Fletcher

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3016
Re: Electric guitar mics
« Reply #15 on: November 17, 2004, 09:17:10 am »

Checked out a Josephson e22S in that application recently... might have a new favorite!!!
Logged
CN Fletcher

mwagener wrote on Sat, 11 September 2004 14:33
We are selling emotions, there are no emotions in a grid


"Recording engineers are an arrogant bunch.  
If you've spent most of your life with a few thousand dollars worth of musicians in the studio, making a decision every second and a half... and you and  they are going to have to live with it for the rest of your lives, you'll get pretty arrogant too.  It takes a certain amount of balls to do that... something around three"
Malcolm Chisholm

Taylor Audio

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2
Re: Electric guitar mics
« Reply #16 on: November 17, 2004, 10:32:24 am »

I find a KSM32 very pleasing on Electric Gtr.
Logged

jimmyjazz

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1885
Re: Electric guitar mics
« Reply #17 on: November 17, 2004, 05:04:56 pm »

I just couldn't make my Royer 121 work on the last record I did.  It was too dark.  I grabbed a Shure SM57 and the guitars just worked a lot better.  (Think Crue/GnR/ACDC as a sonic reference for the band.)

On the other hand, the 121 is working beautifully on a darker pop record I'm working on now.
Logged

JCLopeman

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1
Re: Electric guitar mics
« Reply #18 on: November 18, 2004, 12:08:18 am »

I primarily record electric guitar (I am a guitar player, not an engineer).  I own and frequently use the KSM32, R84, SolidTube, SM57 and U87ai on a loud vintage 30 4x12 cab.  I have found the R84, KSM32 and SM57 (or combos of any of those) to be very good on humbucking heavily distorted sounds, the SolidTube to be very good on strat warm distorted blues/surf sounds, and the U87ai/R84 combo suited for clean/chimey sounds.  I ususally use a '57 centered on the coil for a reference to other mics.  

I have also found the quality of the pre is also very important, especially when recording at lower volumes and with a low output mic like the R84.  Mic placement is the more important than the mic/pre combo.  If you are recording an open back combo, try a mic on the back as well as front and be careful with phase.
Logged

judah

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 275
Re: Electric guitar mics
« Reply #19 on: November 18, 2004, 02:36:08 am »

Fletcher wrote on Wed, 17 November 2004 15:17

Checked out a Josephson e22S in that application recently... might have a new favorite!!!


Hi Fletcher,
would you mind tellin' us more about this very niece piece? I looked at it mostly because of the Albini factor and would like to know what you can do with it. Is it really a swiss army knife of microphones? Which application is best suited for?
The euro-USD exchange rate is so tempting right now. There has never been a better time to buy from US, so I'm looking out for a lot of stuff.

Cheers.

R.
Logged
Ronnie Amighetti
DIESEL
Laboratorio di registrazione sonora

"I'm fucking busy and vice versa."
Dolly Parton

J.J. Blair

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 12809
Re: Electric guitar mics
« Reply #20 on: November 18, 2004, 12:49:56 pm »

The mics I most frequently use for electric guitar are the AKG C12-VR, which is perhaps my favorite (which is the same capsule as the 414-TLII), and a Sennheiser MD409, which is easily my favorite dynamic mic.  I'll use the 409 on both electric bass and guitar amps. You mentioned the R84, which I found works ok with my Ampeg B15 for bass.  There is a miking technique I sometimes use, where you close mic the cabinet and then you use a ribbon mic a few feet off in whatever you determine to be the sweet spot for phasing.  The R84 works pretty well in that situation, but I honestly prefer a RCA 77 or 44 in that situation.  I think it has something to do with less high end response those mics.  

Honestly though, if you want just one mic for the application and you don't want to spend a great deal of money or you don't want to worry about damaging ribbons, I would try the MD409.  Don't even bother with the newer 609s.  Pieces of shit.  But the 409 gives you great low end response and a tight, punchy high end, especially if you like definition in the texture of electric guitar.  I wish I had more of them, to tell you the truth.
Logged
studio info

They say the heart of Rock & Roll is still beating, which is amazing if you consider all the blow it's done over the years.

"The Internet enables pompous blowhards to interact with other pompous blowhards in a big circle jerk of pomposity." - Bill Maher

"The negative aspects of this business, not only will continue to prevail, but will continue to accelerate in madness. Conditions aren't going to get better, because the economics of rock and roll are getting closer and closer to the economics of Big Business America." - Bill Graham

Fletcher

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3016
Re: Electric guitar mics
« Reply #21 on: November 18, 2004, 02:48:25 pm »

judah wrote on Thu, 18 November 2004 02:36


Hi Fletcher,
would you mind tellin' us more about this very niece piece? I looked at it mostly because of the Albini factor and would like to know what you can do with it. Is it really a swiss army knife of microphones?


It's been pretty "swiss army knife" like in my world.  When I tried it on a guitar amp it was about about 2/3'rds of the way from the dust cap to the speaker surround, and tilted to be about parallel with the cone paper.  Sounded HUUUUUGE and clear.

I've used e22S's on drums, on acoustic guitar, on mandolin, on grand piano and have never been disappointed... a couple of times I found myself liking a Gefell M-295 as much or more in the same application, some times less...
Logged
CN Fletcher

mwagener wrote on Sat, 11 September 2004 14:33
We are selling emotions, there are no emotions in a grid


"Recording engineers are an arrogant bunch.  
If you've spent most of your life with a few thousand dollars worth of musicians in the studio, making a decision every second and a half... and you and  they are going to have to live with it for the rest of your lives, you'll get pretty arrogant too.  It takes a certain amount of balls to do that... something around three"
Malcolm Chisholm

jgreenlee

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 50
Re: Electric guitar mics
« Reply #22 on: November 18, 2004, 05:10:55 pm »

I want a few of those e22's to play with.  There's no way I can afford them right now though so I'm staying away.  Perhaps next year I'll be able to jump on a pair or so.  

Anyway....I haven't seen any other side-address SD condensors out there.  Am I just missing them or is the e22 about it?

Peace,

James
Logged

OOF!

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 366
Re: Electric guitar mics
« Reply #23 on: November 19, 2004, 01:55:20 am »

to the chap you found the 121 too dark- it's pretty particular to the pre you're using with it.  the great river nv is a great match for the royer- or most any other ribbon.
surprisingly, the chandler tg2 also is an excellent pairing, even though it doesn't have a lot of top.
the 121 is also particular with placement- put it right on the center of the cone, wherre it's brightest, possibly angled slightly down to avoid some blast.

other favorites of mine are an ev 646- the hammer- excellent punch. for an uncolored sound, an ev re50 omni works great- usually for more nuanced playing.
one more thing- try putting an omni condensor far away- like in the other room, with the door ajar, and mix that in or pan opposite- it adds a lot of dimension
Logged

judah

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 275
Re: Electric guitar mics
« Reply #24 on: November 19, 2004, 02:42:52 am »

Fletcher wrote on Thu, 18 November 2004 20:48

judah wrote on Thu, 18 November 2004 02:36


Hi Fletcher,
would you mind tellin' us more about this very niece piece? I looked at it mostly because of the Albini factor and would like to know what you can do with it. Is it really a swiss army knife of microphones?


It's been pretty "swiss army knife" like in my world.  When I tried it on a guitar amp it was about about 2/3'rds of the way from the dust cap to the speaker surround, and tilted to be about parallel with the cone paper.  Sounded HUUUUUGE and clear.

I've used e22S's on drums, on acoustic guitar, on mandolin, on grand piano and have never been disappointed... a couple of times I found myself liking a Gefell M-295 as much or more in the same application, some times less...



Thanks. I'll look into one. The price is really tempting.
The Gefell line seems very interesting too and so much cheaper here in Europe. Isn't the M295 a SD condenser?

Cheers.

R.
Logged
Ronnie Amighetti
DIESEL
Laboratorio di registrazione sonora

"I'm fucking busy and vice versa."
Dolly Parton

jimmyjazz

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1885
Re: Electric guitar mics
« Reply #25 on: November 19, 2004, 12:10:17 pm »

OOF! wrote on Fri, 19 November 2004 01:55

to the chap you found the 121 too dark- it's pretty particular to the pre you're using with it.  the great river nv is a great match for the royer- or most any other ribbon.


That was me . . . and that was exactly the preamp I used!  I just couldn't get the guitar to "cut" enough.  I probably should have messed with it some more, but we were (as usual) in a hurry.
Logged

mumbles

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 288
Re: Electric guitar mics
« Reply #26 on: November 24, 2004, 08:16:52 pm »

I've had good results with 414buls's and AT4050's.  Mostly though Chandler tg2.
The 4050's are obviously quite a bit brighter, so it depends on the material.
Logged
Seamus
Upstate, NY

Vertigo

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1334
Re: Electric guitar mics
« Reply #27 on: November 26, 2004, 10:40:27 am »

The Blue Ball mic is a lot of fun as a secondary mic on distorted guitar cabs. I'm using one in conjunction with a 57 on some guitars I'm recording right now - good stuff Smile

-Lance
Logged

gtoledo3

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 172
Re: Electric guitar mics
« Reply #28 on: November 26, 2004, 03:01:35 pm »

I usually use a 545, a Beta 52 if I want more "cut"- and if it is a high volume sound, or a R84.

I dare say that if a 57 doesn't sound good, then:

1. Your preamp isn't a good match.
or
2. Your mic placement is off.
or
3. The tone of the guitar/amp sucks.

A 57 isn't always the best sound in solo, but it invariably will work well in the mix, if the actual source sound is good.
Logged

sonixx

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 74
Re: Electric guitar mics
« Reply #29 on: November 26, 2004, 07:43:44 pm »

Fletcher wrote on Wed, 17 November 2004 14:17

Checked out a Josephson e22S in that application recently... might have a new favorite!!!
Fletcher,

do you find your e22S mic slightly dark?  I've found a e609S and a e22S are nice complements on the same cab...

-keith-
Logged
Pages: 1 [2] 3  All   Go Up