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Author Topic: 100-700HZ  (Read 6962 times)

J-Texas

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100-700HZ
« on: March 15, 2009, 10:17:41 am »

I know J. has mentioned this range before as being really tough to "get" and very important at the same time. Give or take a few Hz.

Man am I realizing this now. Now? Finally.

I'm really finding where I like things to be 1k up and 100 down (finding... haven't found), but the meat in the sandwhich is where it's at. That area is so important and so easy to futz up.

Things can really be powerful or really muddy and a mess. I've really noticed this trying to mix for small speakers at lower levels.
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Jason Thompson
www.4141studios.com

j.hall

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Re: 100-700HZ
« Reply #1 on: March 16, 2009, 04:15:49 pm »

keep working at it.  i certainly know that i am.
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bob ebeling

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Re: 100-700HZ
« Reply #2 on: March 25, 2009, 11:18:07 am »

It would be great for mixer channels to have a '-2db @ 220' button.  
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Bob Ebeling
bobebeling.bandcamp.com
Virginia

RSettee

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Re: 100-700HZ
« Reply #3 on: April 17, 2009, 08:53:21 pm »

I definetely like the 1-3 kHz range for a go to range in the liveliness of a mix. 100 Hz I don't use so much, I tend to use 250-400 Hz more. Some of the 500-700 Hz can get a bit too wooly at times, just as some 800-900 can be a bit nasal at times.
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bblackwood

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Re: 100-700HZ
« Reply #4 on: April 17, 2009, 09:03:21 pm »

Getting 100-300 Hz right is really difficult but truly seems to separate the 'men from the boys'...
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Brad Blackwood
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Phillip Graham

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Re: 100-700HZ
« Reply #5 on: April 17, 2009, 09:33:07 pm »

bblackwood wrote on Fri, 17 April 2009 21:03

Getting 100-300 Hz right is really difficult but truly seems to separate the 'men from the boys'...


And for us in the live sound world the most important range for getting the PA system to integrate properly with the room...
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Phillip Graham

wwittman

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Re: 100-700HZ
« Reply #6 on: April 17, 2009, 09:37:06 pm »

FWIW, i almost always roll some low mid (somewhere between 300-700) on toms and bass drum and the odd other drum mic (like a room)

but on EVERYTHING else?
I almost never touch that range at all.

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William Wittman
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stevieeastend

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Re: 100-700HZ
« Reply #7 on: April 18, 2009, 05:16:44 pm »

wwittman wrote on Sat, 18 April 2009 03:37

FWIW, i almost always roll some low mid (somewhere between 300-700) on toms and bass drum and the odd other drum mic (like a room)

but on EVERYTHING else?
I almost never touch that range at all.




I can second that   Smile  although I am little sloppy when it comes to toms in general... rarely EQ them..

wwittman

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Re: 100-700HZ
« Reply #8 on: April 18, 2009, 11:53:34 pm »

that's okay, I rarely actually MIC them
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William Wittman
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j.hall

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Re: 100-700HZ
« Reply #9 on: April 19, 2009, 06:07:16 pm »

bblackwood wrote on Fri, 17 April 2009 20:03

Getting 100-300 Hz right is really difficult but truly seems to separate the 'men from the boys'...


INDEED!!!!
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Chris Ilett

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Re: 100-700HZ
« Reply #10 on: April 20, 2009, 06:27:08 am »

Phillip Graham wrote on Fri, 17 April 2009 20:33

bblackwood wrote on Fri, 17 April 2009 21:03

Getting 100-300 Hz right is really difficult but truly seems to separate the 'men from the boys'...


And for us in the live sound world the most important range for getting the PA system to integrate properly with the room...


Depending on the room  Shocked

Phillip Graham

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Re: 100-700HZ
« Reply #11 on: May 01, 2009, 10:19:20 am »

Chris Ilett wrote on Mon, 20 April 2009 06:27

Phillip Graham wrote on Fri, 17 April 2009 20:33

bblackwood wrote on Fri, 17 April 2009 21:03

Getting 100-300 Hz right is really difficult but truly seems to separate the 'men from the boys'...


And for us in the live sound world the most important range for getting the PA system to integrate properly with the room...


Depending on the room  Shocked


Hey Chris,

What I meant by my statement is that not only is this frequency range important for the mix, but that the rooms' role with the speaker system influences it, too.

Most small professional speaker systems have a high degree of directivity (ie directional control of where the sound goes) above 2kHz, but below this point the wavelengths get large and spill around the sides/back of the box.

Just as your studio monitors interact differently in the recording space depending on whether they are near/far from the wall, the same is true with PA systems.

Unlike most studio settings where people seem adverse to speaker equalization, we use it as a powerful tool to smooth and shape the speaker/room combination through the mids and midbass.  Often times the speaker location is dictated by factors of asthetics and is sub-optimal acoustically, so we utilize every tool we can get.

Using one of the major pro-sound analysis products, one can look at the phase behavior in the Nyquist plot of the system and ascertain if the response error is attributed to the loudspeaker system, or not.  Since loudspeaker acoustical response is, in general, minimum phase, one can calculate the Hilbert transform of the magnitude response and see if the resulting calculated phase behavior matches the measured behavior.

If the measured phase is not minimum phase in nature, then it is generally time to start looking for acoustic treatment solutions, if the situation is amenable to this...

The only name I know of in the studio world who specifically does this kind of work is Bob Hodas.

Last fall, during and after his session on small space acoustics I had a lively discussion with John Storyck about WSDG's use of similar measurement techniques and equalization.

If you are an AES member, and listen to John's talk from AES 109 in San Fran, I am the fellow asking pointed questions throughout his talk  Cool
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Phillip Graham

Nacho

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Re: 100-700HZ
« Reply #12 on: May 08, 2009, 05:23:53 pm »

bob ebeling wrote on Wed, 25 March 2009 10:18

It would be great for mixer channels to have a '-2db @ 220' button.  


And another one at 125-160hz!!!
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andychamp

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Re: 100-700HZ
« Reply #13 on: May 12, 2009, 01:16:07 pm »

The realization that this area is hard to EQ properly has led me to pay more attention to mic choice & placement. Highs and lows are somehow easier to be aware of.
It's still a bit esoteric to me, but easier to achieve good results with than trying to get to grips with an EQ.
I like fixed-frequency EQs better than sweep EQs,anyway, because they either work, or they don't. I tend to lose myself - and time - with sweep EQs

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André
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J-Texas

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Re: 100-700HZ
« Reply #14 on: May 12, 2009, 03:04:25 pm »

andychamp wrote on Tue, 12 May 2009 12:16

The realization that this area is hard to EQ properly has led me to pay more attention to mic choice & placement. Highs and lows are somehow easier to be aware of.
It's still a bit esoteric to me, but easier to achieve good results with than trying to get to grips with an EQ.



Absolutely (as far as tracking) and I would just add mic patterns to that as well.
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Jason Thompson
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