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Author Topic: Treating a studio on a budget. Help!  (Read 5648 times)

Arran Black

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Re: Treating a studio on a budget. Help!
« Reply #15 on: March 11, 2009, 12:38:05 pm »

Hey all. Thanks for the fantastic response. I believe the concluding note is “Take better measurement’s”. I should have no issues getting an Omnidirectional mic and I will run the tests again tomorrow. Where would you recommend positioning the mic and the speaker. Im assuming Mic in the middle of the room.

The Speaker im using is a Studio spare model, I cant remember the number, I will find out. But we used it for some tests a while back and it had a fairly flat response across the board as I remember, so it should be good for this I hope.

The “COBC Studio 1 Energy.jpg” graph is taken from Logic’s Impulse Response Utility. Im assuming its Hz across the top but your right its not labelled for some reason and the app itself seems to not want to give anything away.

Whilst im in the space tomorrow. Is there any other information you would like/ recommend that I find out. Any pictures you think would help if I took.

Manny thanks

Arran
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Sigert

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Re: Treating a studio on a budget. Help!
« Reply #16 on: March 11, 2009, 01:25:20 pm »

I'm a bit in doubt myself on how to position mic and speaker.

As far as my knowledge goes, for now all you need measured with a tapemeasure is room dimensions between solid boundaries ofcourse.

Take plenty of photo's for your own personal archive. In this digital age, quantity is hardly an issue. Smile
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Ethan Winer

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Re: Treating a studio on a budget. Help!
« Reply #17 on: March 11, 2009, 03:40:10 pm »

Arran Black wrote on Wed, 11 March 2009 12:38

Im assuming Mic in the middle of the room.


For a control room, the microphone should be where your head is while listening to the speakers. Ideally the response will not change around the room, but it always does. So what matters most is what you hear while mixing.

--Ethan

Arran Black

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Re: Treating a studio on a budget. Help!
« Reply #18 on: March 13, 2009, 09:49:49 am »

Right. I have done another set of sweeps this time onto an AKG C414 on the Omni setting. The speaker was positioned at one end of the room and the mic in the centre at around head height. index.php/fa/11641/0/
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Arran Black

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Re: Treating a studio on a budget. Help!
« Reply #19 on: March 13, 2009, 09:51:45 am »

index.php/fa/11642/0/
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Arran Black

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Re: Treating a studio on a budget. Help!
« Reply #20 on: March 13, 2009, 09:53:03 am »

index.php/fa/11643/0/
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Arran Black

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Re: Treating a studio on a budget. Help!
« Reply #21 on: March 13, 2009, 09:54:58 am »

index.php/fa/11645/0/
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andrebrito

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Re: Treating a studio on a budget. Help!
« Reply #22 on: March 13, 2009, 11:09:49 am »

I usually make two kind of measurements

1 -  mic on one corner, speaker on the opposite corner

This gives a general idea of the room

2 -  mic at listener's position, speaker at its normal place

Start working from here. I prefer to make measurements of each speaker at the time, and finally both at the same time
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franman

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Re: Treating a studio on a budget. Help!
« Reply #23 on: March 13, 2009, 11:41:51 pm »

and just to chime in:

we would typically concentrate impulse and freq measurement at the listening position as well.. this is how we experiment with location and fine tuning of speaker position.

I think Andre's suggestion of a corner measurement to get an idea of what the 'room is doing' is completely valid, but we are concentrating on what it's doing at the listening position.

We absolutely hunt around the room with a hand held RTA (or SPL meter) looking for modal peaks. This helps in deciding where to locate bass trapping particularly if you're considering tuned traps...

So that's the $1500 consult instructions... Of course, there's always the part involving 'what do I do with this information now'.... that's the 'fun' part!

FM   Cool
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Sigert

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Re: Treating a studio on a budget. Help!
« Reply #24 on: March 15, 2009, 09:00:07 am »

Hey Aran,

It's a recording room we're talking about, right? Unless you set up a different objective, which ofcourse is prone to personal taste and demand, the goal of treating a small recording space (<40m
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Sigert

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Re: Treating a studio on a budget. Help!
« Reply #25 on: March 15, 2009, 09:42:39 am »

Also, looking at your waterfall again... it strikes me as odd that your first 0,3 seconds seem to show no decay at all. Could it be a little hickup in your settings? I'm not talking about your hardware settings or anything, just your settings controlling how the data is displayed in the waterfall.
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Ethan Winer

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Re: Treating a studio on a budget. Help!
« Reply #26 on: March 15, 2009, 12:33:37 pm »

Sigert wrote on Sun, 15 March 2009 09:42

it strikes me as odd that your first 0,3 seconds seem to show no decay at all.


As I read it, that's 30 milliseconds, not 300. Waterfall plots of low frequencies are better shown out to a full second, or at least half a second. Whatever is needed to show the top 30 dB or so of decay at all frequencies. Below is a typical example.

--Ethan

http://www.realtraps.com/art_etf2.gif

Sigert

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Re: Treating a studio on a budget. Help!
« Reply #27 on: March 20, 2009, 06:28:32 am »

0.03seconds is indeed a very short timespan. Could you post the zoomed in version of your waterfall plot, up to about 250Hz or so, length about one second or so.
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Paul LaPlaca

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Re: Treating a studio on a budget. Help!
« Reply #28 on: May 19, 2009, 10:25:56 pm »

Is this thread dead?

Very interested in the next step, how to interpret the data and what to do to correct any problems.

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Constantin

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Re: Treating a studio on a budget. Help!
« Reply #29 on: May 20, 2009, 03:40:08 am »

Hi
i will try to give yiu a rough answer, but i´m not a real expert  Razz

When you first measure a not treated room , you have to save this measurements as a reference, with detailed dokumetation about the conditions.

Ethan wrote a nice acoustic FAQ what all rooms need, so you can first start with broadband basstrapping an treating the first reflektionpoints. This treating require no "before measurements" because you will need it anyhow.

After this, or before, you can start to find the best Speakerlocation for your roomsetup. Please note that Speakerlocation is minimum as important as treatment.
I remember barefoot has wrote a exeltool for showing the effekt of speakerlocation to the freq response at the listeningposition, some time ago. The name was wallbounce calculator i think. It`s just a 2 dimensional calculator, but gives you a rough idea what happens at different locations.

After this you have to meassure again, and can compare your reverbation time and freq. response with the old room.
Now you can watch for leftover problems in the room.

francis already gave good advise how to find good places for tuned basstraps.
Quote:

We absolutely hunt around the room with a hand held RTA (or SPL meter) looking for modal peaks. This helps in deciding where to locate bass trapping particularly if you're considering tuned traps...


When your problems are not the bass (i don`t think so) you can continue with with other pannels or/and diffusion to adjust the room like you want it.



I hope you can understand what i mean. i have some problems with the language  Embarassed



cheers
Constantin
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