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Author Topic: Resilient Channel  (Read 2055 times)

Dusk Bennett

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Resilient Channel
« on: December 23, 2008, 10:14:24 am »

I've found a ton of info on how to NOT install resilient channel but few topics really get into the details on how to finish it. I have drywallers coming within hours and I understand they are supposed to float the drywall off the floor and corners by at least 1/4". Additionally, I need to somehow chase them around with a caulking gun to caulk these edges after they finish hanging everything. Once they start to mud and tape though doesnt the mud and tape on the corners marry the two pieces together anyways, sort of defeating the purpose of resillient channel?

Also, not that I have any time to deal with it but how much different in "accousitc caulk" than regular sealant or painter caulk? There are Home Depot varieties I can get that will seal the cornets fine but they do not sell any acoustical caulking.

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Dusk Bennett
Artist Development/Production
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www.duskbennett.com

Thomas Jouanjean

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Re: Resilient Channel
« Reply #1 on: December 23, 2008, 06:04:29 pm »

Dusk Bennett wrote on Tue, 23 December 2008 09:14

 Once they start to mud and tape though doesnt the mud and tape on the corners marry the two pieces together anyways, sort of defeating the purpose of resillient channel?



... Welcome to the reality of a lot of acoustic products. AFAIC - I go for different solutions.
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Thomas Jouanjean
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martindale

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Re: Resilient Channel
« Reply #2 on: December 23, 2008, 06:43:39 pm »

Dusk--if you need a great answer "within hours" I hope this gets to you in time---but honestly your best bet might be, if possible, to just blow off using the resilient channel. As previous posts have suggested, this is not the best way to add significant sound isolation. We do a lot of "commercial" acoustic consulting, and we see resilient channel installed incorrectly more often than not, specified by some architect or contractor who doesn't know better.
The discussion of actually implementing a true "floated" wall/ceiling system is lengthy, and also covered in earlier posts. But I'd say, at this point of no return in your construction, ditch the resilient channel and see if they can apply the cost to adding another or two of drywall---mass is your only real friend at this point.  
The use of caulk at floors and edges and piece joins is to ensure the assembly is air tight--this is not a place where physical de-coupling happens. You also don't need "acoustic" (non-hardening) caulk here cause you are not trying to "float" --you are need to seal. Non-hardening caulk has its use in other places. If you forgo the resilient, bring all the drywall as close as possible to the floor and edges, don't hold off 1/4"---and then caulk the small seam that is left.

Good luck! Happy Christmas if you can rest easy!
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C.Cash

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Re: Resilient Channel
« Reply #3 on: December 23, 2008, 06:56:10 pm »

  I used resilient channel in my space.
I think it would be very difficult to use it perfectly as it is supposed to be installed. However, I think that it has done a pretty good job De-coupling the Sheetrock from the wooden beams.I can actually push my wall and it will give a little.
 It is by no means a perfect solution but I think it makes a big difference for isolation.Everything helps, it all adds up in the end, IMO.
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Thomas Jouanjean

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Re: Resilient Channel
« Reply #4 on: December 24, 2008, 06:09:12 am »

martindale wrote on Tue, 23 December 2008 17:43

mass is your only real friend at this point.


Exactly.
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Thomas Jouanjean
Northward Acoustics - Engineering and Designs
http://www.northwardacoustics.com
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Northward-Acoustics/1062876633 71

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Senad

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Re: Resilient Channel
« Reply #5 on: January 01, 2009, 05:54:37 am »

martindale wrote on Tue, 23 December 2008 17:43


The use of caulk at floors and edges and piece joins is to ensure the assembly is air tight--this is not a place where physical de-coupling happens. You also don't need "acoustic" (non-hardening) caulk here cause you are not trying to "float" --you are need to seal. Non-hardening caulk has its use in other places. If you forgo the resilient, bring all the drywall as close as possible to the floor and edges, don't hold off 1/4"---and then caulk the small seam that is left.

Good luck! Happy Christmas if you can rest easy!


This would only be true if the whole room is being floated (floating floor and then the whole room built onto it), but if you install the drywall onto RC and it's resting  on the floor, which is common to the next room you are isolating from, you're defeating the whole purpose of the RC, because your transmition path is open onto the floor and into the next room or outter space.
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