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Author Topic: recording overheads in mono  (Read 1880 times)

redelephant

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recording overheads in mono
« on: June 15, 2004, 01:42:09 am »

I was reading about the new Pedro The Lion record, and according to his website he recorded drums with one mic. So, has anyone ever tried it? I thought I would just to experiment. The results were stellar with a LD condenser (414) and less then stellar with a SD (451) condenser. The 'image' was huge with a 414ULS into my ME-1NV. I didn't even really need the snare or tom mic's. I don't think I would ever do this for a client as it seems a bit risky. Like I may down the line wish I had a stereo panned image for the drums.

Anyway I thought I would share, and see if any of my indie rock practicing counterparts use this method.
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jakabo

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Re: recording overheads in mono
« Reply #1 on: June 15, 2004, 09:01:00 am »

I love recording OH in mono. Most people just want to see 2 mics in the standard studio configurations. Even the 3 mic thing can be a tough sell (I once had to argue with A FREAKIN BASS PLAYER about it...and of course the arguement lasted longer than setting up the mics, adjusting, recording, playing back some test drums and having him say "hey, that does sound good").

It's funny, the more experienced drummers (this is a relative term for a "project" studio) seem to be set in their ideas of how to set things up ("but when I was at Berklee they used 17 mics on my kit"...grrr real quote), the less experienced ones come in and let me do whatever....it's pity cause a kick ass drummer can get a kick ass sound with one mic. I can't help the non-kick ass drummers as much as I want to.

I agree a LDC (or ribbon) sounds great for this. Don't laugh but the AT3035 ($200 thingy) can sound great every once in a while for this (the only other thing I ever use it for is room mic). It has pretty decent off-axis response so you can get pretty low (height not frequency) without "losing" the cymbals, I think I tried this cause I saw a picture of a Bowie session and they had an 87 (maybe 67) right over the snare with no other overheads.

I couldn't do this before due to lack of input converter channels but I had thought of setting up 3 OH's. Stereo and mono and then could pick at mix down. Now I have the channels, but want the least possible amount of choices available at mixdown, unless I really know the clients well and feel comfortable taking the time to explore more later on. Tell me what you want, we'll get as close as possible during setup, adjust accordingly, and that's what we go with. I suck at mixing and want it as close as possible from the get go (I've only had 2 or 3 projects mixed by someone else though).

ken
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j.hall

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Re: recording overheads in mono
« Reply #2 on: June 15, 2004, 09:29:26 am »

drums in mono

Jon Brion

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debuys

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Re: recording overheads in mono
« Reply #3 on: June 19, 2004, 02:23:42 am »

Minimalist techniques are wonderfull. Minimalist drumers make it better.

One setup I've had great luck with is makeing the drumer play only kick, hat and snare. 421, 81, 57 with a single 414 OH. The kick mic for a little kick definition and the other two for a little stereo imageing.
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Robert de Buys
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j.hall

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Re: recording overheads in mono
« Reply #4 on: June 21, 2004, 01:00:09 pm »

debuys wrote on Sat, 19 June 2004 01:23

Minimalist techniques are wonderfull. Minimalist drumers make it better.




agreed

with the right drummer, one mic can easily do the job.

not an easy fit these days.....
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