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Author Topic: Human hearing, Fletcher Munson and Spectral Analysis  (Read 1717 times)

Mickey Tee

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Human hearing, Fletcher Munson and Spectral Analysis
« on: July 02, 2008, 06:03:17 am »


Hi,

Just wondering if anyone has any thoughts on Fletcher-Munson or Robinson-Dadson curves with respect to mixing/ mastering music.

Given the bump at approx 1.5khz in the curves, then ideally, for human hearing, you would want this area to be slightly lower in amplitude than say 950hz and 2.5khz? That is, taking into account the natural way our ears work, in order to make a sound more even and less "harsh" (as the octave 1khz - 2khz can be quite harsh and strident) you would deliberately dip this frequency range, if it is not dipped already?


Anyone?


Thanks for your help,

Mickey
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Barry Hufker

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Re: Human hearing, Fletcher Munson and Spectral Analysis
« Reply #1 on: July 02, 2008, 11:04:33 am »

According to Fletcher-Munson Equal Loudness Contours our ears are most sensitive at about 3.5 kHz.  If you look at the contours they are the inverse of our hearing response.  To see hearing response, flip the chart upside down.

I believe it's important to not get too analytical about this.  There have been some producers, who in an effort to make their records sound louder have boosted the range around 3.5 k, but the absolute rule is, "If it sounds good it is good".  You may want to pay attention to different "frequency groupings" in a mix just to make sure the sound isn't too muddy or too bright or too... but in general, if it sounds good it is good.  And that should be just about all you need to complete a recording.

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Mickey Tee

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Re: Human hearing, Fletcher Munson and Spectral Analysis
« Reply #2 on: July 02, 2008, 11:39:54 am »

Barry Hufker wrote on Wed, 02 July 2008 16:04

According to Fletcher-Munson Equal Loudness Contours our ears are most sensitive at about 3.5 kHz.  If you look at the contours they are the inverse of our hearing response.  To see hearing response, flip the chart upside down.

I believe it's important to not get too analytical about this.  There have been some producers, who in an effort to make their records sound louder have boosted the range around 3.5 k, but the absolute rule is, "If it sounds good it is good".  You may want to pay attention to different "frequency groupings" in a mix just to make sure the sound isn't too muddy or too bright or too... but in general, if it sounds good it is good.  And that should be just about all you need to complete a recording.




Lol, you're right aren't you! I hadn't noticed... Embarassed
And agreed at not getting too analytical, I just enjoy knowing what means what and what sounds like what and what makes what sound like what Smile

Thanks for your input!
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