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Author Topic: LAUNCH ALERT  (Read 739 times)

Berolzheimer

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LAUNCH ALERT
« on: December 05, 2007, 05:57:41 pm »

LAUNCH ALERT

Brian Webb
Ventura County, California
kd6nrp@earthlink.net
http://www.spacearchive.info

2007 December 4 (Tuesday) 19:35 PST
------------------------------------------------------------ ----------

WEDNESDAY VANDENBERG LAUNCH

A Delta II rocket carrying Italy's COSMO-2 Earth imaging satellite
is scheduled for launch from Vandenberg AFB tomorrow night. The
Delta is set to lift-off from Space Launch Complex 2-West at 18:31:39
PST, the start of a 1-second launch window.

Following lift-off, the Delta II will begin turning toward the south
and follow a flight azimuth (heading) of 196?. Several minutes later
the rocket insert COSMO-2 into a 100 x 348 nautical mile (185 x 645
km) polar orbit inclined 97.80? to the equator.

A launch weather forecast issued this morning by the 30th Weather
Squadron called for a 20% probability of violating weather
constraints due to winds. The forecast also predicted 2/8ths cloud
cover from cirrus between 30,000 and 35,000 feet. In other words,
the weather was predicted to be quite good.

In the event the launch is scrubbed, other launch opportunities will
occur for several days with the brief launch window opening about
0.7-seconds earlier each day. Although a launch opportunity occurs
Thursday night, the Air Force estimated the probability of violating
launch constraints at that time at 80% due to thick clouds and 40%
due to precipitation.

Liftoff occurs after nightfall. If the weather is clear, the launch
should be visible to the naked eye from at least as far away as San
Francisco, Sacramento, the Sierras, and San Diego. During the first
minute of flight, the Delta will be a bright orange thanks to the
bright orange flames of the four solid rocket motors strapped around
the first stage for extra thrust.

Once the solid motors burnout, the liquid fuel, first stage main
engine will continue to burn and the Delta will resemble a moving
white star.

While liftoff occurs too long after sunset for the rocket's exhaust
to catch the Sun's rays, observers at dark locations may still see the
main engine's ghostly exhaust plume during the later portion of the
first stage burn.

Few photos of the exhaust plume from Delta II night launches exist. If
you have a digital camera, you can try to record this unusual
phenomenon by placing your camera on a tripod, using a 50 to 100mm
lens, and employing these settings:

ISO: 1600

Noise Reduction: On

f/ Stop: 2.8

Exposure: 1/8, 1/4, 1/2, 1, 2, and 4 seconds

------------------------------------------------------------ ----------

Copyright ? 2007 Brian Webb. All rights reserved. This newsletter may
be distributed in its entirety without restriction. Excerpts may not
be reprinted or posted elsewhere without prior permission.
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mgod

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Re: LAUNCH ALERT
« Reply #1 on: December 05, 2007, 09:35:58 pm »

Nothing visible from Silver Lake with a complete western view. Bad air tonight though. Hazy and damp.

DS
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studiojimi

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Re: LAUNCH ALERT
« Reply #2 on: December 06, 2007, 01:30:15 am »

i was thinking i'd at least hear the sonic boom while i was swimming bout that timeindex.php/fa/6896/0/
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