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Author Topic: room too dry, what are the sidefx?  (Read 1745 times)

Steffen

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room too dry, what are the sidefx?
« on: November 06, 2007, 06:20:39 am »

....or are there any recommended reverberation time target values for mastering rooms?

steff
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Ethan Winer

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Re: room too dry, what are the sidefx?
« Reply #1 on: November 06, 2007, 01:05:03 pm »

Steffen wrote on Tue, 06 November 2007 06:20

are there any recommended reverberation time target values for mastering rooms?


Yes, and I'll let the experts here offer their suggestions. One thing I can say for sure is:

1) RT60 is a misnomer in small rooms, but that metric is often used anyway because it's convenient.

2) More important than overall "RT60" is having a similar decay time over as wide a range of frequencies as possible.

Okay, sorry, that was two things. Very Happy

The main point being that decay times should not be averaged over the full range, but assessed in third octave bands. One classic problem is caused by treating a room with too much thin foam or thin fiberglass. This makes the room dead sounding to hand claps, but the bass is still boomy and dominant. This is why broadband absorption is the preferred approach. My mantra is absorption should be effective to as low a frequency as possible.

--Ethan

Steffen

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Re: room too dry, what are the sidefx?
« Reply #2 on: November 07, 2007, 07:26:07 pm »

thanx Ethan!

here´s a t60 plot of my room (actually 9 plots averaged, dodekaeder at 3 positions and
mic at 3 different positions).

index.php/fa/6616/0/

room is  6.26m x 4.77m x 2.6m  (20.53ft x 15.6ft x 8.5ft)

complete room in room construction. no bass trapping yet.
I will add some corner traps plus remove a few foam panels in the non 1st reflexion zones to make the reverb times more even frequencywise.

I´m really happy with the sound in the room but I change over from Genelec 1032 to B&W 802 speakers in 3 weeks so I want to get the acoustic as good as it can be for this roomsize.

steff
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franman

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Re: room too dry, what are the sidefx?
« Reply #3 on: November 07, 2007, 10:22:58 pm »

IMO, Critical listening rooms should exhibit decay times between .2 and .3 sec over the entire spectrum... Obviously the lowest octaves are the hardest to control. This is where a waterfall plot can be helpful... (It will of course show you the resonances in your room and your loudspeakers as well!) You are on target but you need some DEEP trapping to target the range below 80Hz... Corner traps?? Absolutely! Deep corner traps!! get down to at least 1/4 wavelength at 50Hz if you can! Your new 802 should be good down to around 35Hz (or so)...

It's pretty normal to see the higher octaves decay rolloff like this.. just physics.. sound in air and all that stuff. If the room sounds too dead to you, then maybe it is. I can usually make a fair judgement of a room when I first walk in, talking with the client for 15 minutes before we ever listen to any music. Just the sound of my voice is enough to excite low enough frequencies to get an idea of not only overall decay time, but any obvious modal issues. The room should sound "natural" for lack of a better word. Too dead, makes me feel uncomfortable and too live is readily audible. Critical listening rooms should never have a discernable decay. This is when the room is obviously coloring the playback...

Simple rule... we are in the business of making rooms for accurate 'reproduction'.. they should not contribute to the 'sound of the production'....
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