R/E/P Community

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

Pages: 1 [2]  All   Go Down

Author Topic: Pay Cut  (Read 9811 times)

rnicklaus

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3859
Re: Pay Cut
« Reply #15 on: August 31, 2007, 12:22:37 PM »

Jay Kadis wrote on Fri, 31 August 2007 09:14

I have to agree with Keyplayer.  Out of 900-odd hits a recent CD Baby album page, we've sold 2 CDs.  Interestingly enough each buyer left a 5-star review so at least they don't think it sucks.  There is a disconnect between surfing and buying.

CD Baby is a wonderful form of distribution, but the promotion side has gone nowhere.  We have some play on local college radio and an internet radio/blog but no one is buying.  Admittedly this is a niche release (it would have been mainstream 25 years ago when it was recorded) but I find most people I know using CD Baby have had the same result.

If there is a way of promoting releases that actually results in any form of income I'd like to hear about it.


Is CD Baby supposed to promote releases?

As it has been stated before, the cost of signing a band and recording the record is just a small part of the big picture.

Marketing and promotion is VERY expensive with NO guarantees of any return on the investment.
Logged
R.N.

Jay Kadis

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2165
Re: Pay Cut
« Reply #16 on: August 31, 2007, 01:12:25 PM »

rnicklaus wrote on Fri, 31 August 2007 09:22


Is CD Baby supposed to promote releases?

No, they just provide distribution although they do promote some selected CDs on their front page.

rnicklaus wrote on Fri, 31 August 2007 09:22


As it has been stated before, the cost of signing a band and recording the record is just a small part of the big picture.

Marketing and promotion is VERY expensive with NO guarantees of any return on the investment.


And that is still the issue.

rnicklaus

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3859
Re: Pay Cut
« Reply #17 on: August 31, 2007, 01:15:29 PM »

What kind of traffic does CD Baby get?  I thought they distributed to iTunes, etc and the online stores (Amazon, etc) and to any Brick and Mortar that would agree to stock.

I didn't realize that CD Baby was also a destination for record buyers looking for product.
Logged
R.N.

Jay Kadis

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2165
Re: Pay Cut
« Reply #18 on: August 31, 2007, 01:25:27 PM »

They claim $40M in physical sales since 1998.  They started servicing iTunes and dozens of other download sites only in the last year or two, so they were originally a CD retailer.  Very nice folks, too.

You can search by genre, sounds-like, and lots of other search criteria.  But you have to steer the traffic there yourself.

Ryan Wiley

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 16
Re: Pay Cut
« Reply #19 on: September 03, 2007, 05:06:45 PM »

The mechanism behind giving away the music is simple. Direct download from the band's website and/or other sites specifically designed to deliver high quality mp3 (or other audio formats).

I'm not talking about free samples to drive album sales. I'm talking free albums. We have to make the assumption that as music gets easier and easier to copy/trade/pirate, or whatever you want to call it, fans are going to pay less and less for music and the costs will only go up to cover the losses on the distribution and/or the cost of new technology to fight it. We also know that a sample, even a good one, does not always serve to convince someone become a fan. At least not a big enough fan to buy the full album.

Fans are created by giving an audience a comprehensive look at the artist in a certain light that makes them identify with the art is some way (superficial or otherwise). Indies don't have the ability to use MTV/crosspromotional tools/etc to hype smaller artists, and so without hearing the works in their entirety, potential fans do not have enough information to evaluate artists. This is especially true considering how the mindset of the young fan who has grown up with heavy media influence operates in choosing music. By giving the music away in an easy, no-hassle way, you allow the audience to make a more informed choice as to who they will be fans of. Bands will, of course, have to work harder at making better songs, because they will be evaluated on the art they create and not whether some distribution marketing company got it on the endcaps at best buy or whether some radio promoter got the right single to play 24 hours a day for weeks on end at the local clear channel radio station. Competition is good for experienced producers because they are the ones that know how to make a quality album. Demand for bands to create better music will drive them to people who are qualified.

Money can be made by artists in one of four areas: direct revenue from album sales, performance royalties, merch, and ticket sales. Giving away the music does not take anything away from performance royalties, because you can always retain that aspect of you copyright by prohibiting it from being used in commercial productions. Merch and ticket sales should increase because more people will know your music and want to come to your shows. We have complained for years that live music is in decline in many areas of the country. I contend that this could renew an interest in new upcoming live artists by getting their material out to a larger audience.

I am currently putting my money where my mouth is. In two months I will be launching a band via an indie label and the record will be available for free online and for $1 at shows. We have been spending over three months on production and I have paid an experienced co-producer a solid rate in an established studio.  We will see if it pays off and I will keep everyone posted as promo materials are available and as soon as the album is available for download. The artist is a young indie punk band with some rough edges, but a good solid act and alot of drive. Their target audience is the highschool/college crowd which i think will prove to be a good real world test of this approach.
Logged
Pages: 1 [2]  All   Go Up
 

Site Hosted By Ashdown Technologies, Inc.

Page created in 0.024 seconds with 16 queries.