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Author Topic: My room's acoustics are worse than I thought. Very worried...  (Read 4881 times)

jimmyjazz

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Re: My room's acoustics are worse than I thought. Very worried...
« Reply #15 on: August 03, 2007, 04:42:39 pm »

Parallel walls can lead to flutter echoes, which can be controlled with high-frequency absorption.

A lack of symmetry makes it difficult to get your imaging (among other things) right.
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Steve Hudson

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Re: My room's acoustics are worse than I thought. Very worried...
« Reply #16 on: August 03, 2007, 05:38:21 pm »

jimmyjazz wrote on Fri, 03 August 2007 15:42

Parallel walls can lead to flutter echoes, which can be controlled with high-frequency absorption.

A lack of symmetry makes it difficult to get your imaging (among other things) right.


What Jimmy said. You could get away with tracking in your space, but you'd be challenged to make a stereo mix that translates outside your room, given all non-symmetrical surfaces. Remember that what you hear in the control room is a blend of the direct sound from the monitors and the reflections from the walls/ceilings. If the surfaces are not symmetrical, sound will be reflected and reach your ears at different times, causing comb filtering, nulls and peaks in frequencies, etc., a real nightmare. Your designer/consultant should be shot for giving you the advice he did. But that's not constructive at this point.

Check out this useful forum on the Web for some great info on studio design and do-it-yourself studio treatments:

http://www.johnlsayers.com/phpBB2/viewforum.php?f=2&sid= 1ad3d9c1b38607c7e1a60268407f7cc3

Good luck!
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jimmyjazz

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Re: My room's acoustics are worse than I thought. Very worried...
« Reply #17 on: August 03, 2007, 10:09:12 pm »

To further Steve's point, those reflections that cause frequency response concerns (comb filtering, etc.) aren't a function of symmetry.  Assymetry just makes all that bad stuff worse.
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gullfo

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Re: My room's acoustics are worse than I thought. Very worried...
« Reply #18 on: August 06, 2007, 08:19:22 pm »

i concur, getting more symmetry on the mix position should help. it may be as simple as turning your desk and some additional controls such as absorption. you might find you need to build out the room a bit to gain symmetry - maybe adding some broadband trapping across a false front would give you more effective symmetry and some additional frequency control. you could embed the TV into the new front wall.
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franman

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Re: My room's acoustics are worse than I thought. Very worried...
« Reply #19 on: August 12, 2007, 05:51:07 pm »

I like Glenn's idea... addresses a few of the problems with this room while adding some much needed broadband trapping at the front..
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brett

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Re: My room's acoustics are worse than I thought. Very worried...
« Reply #20 on: August 15, 2007, 04:54:41 pm »

glen's plans look goood. You may also consider shifting your speakers to the right facing the corner where you now have the TV hung. An absorber could be run accross that corner easily. Also, if leaving that desk around the wall you might consider running 12" batt under it where it meets the wall to keep it from resonating. And then making another soffit mounted absorber run around the ceiling of the front wall either with panels or 12" batt wrapped in fabric. You could use wire stringers to place it and then wrap it with the fabric.

As with glens idea , the rear wall seems close and would need thicker panels than what glen has drawn to be effective. The side corners of your trapazoid will need treatment as well. And oabove you will require a panel if not already treated.

Regards,
Brett  
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