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Author Topic: Yahoo helps expose Loudness war issues to the masses  (Read 1598 times)

e-cue

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Yahoo helps expose Loudness war issues to the masses
« on: July 10, 2007, 06:01:44 pm »

I hope no one posted this yet...



I think most of us have seen the video they reference already...


http://tech.yahoo.com/blogs/null/33549

Nice to see some civilians get schooled by something like yahoo.
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Adam Dempsey

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Re: Yahoo helps expose Loudness war issues to the masses
« Reply #1 on: July 10, 2007, 06:48:37 pm »

FWIW, talking with Jack here yesterday about dynamic range on music DVD video and it gave me reason to go home and try again with David Bowie's "Reality" tour DVD (great show, and all from the one concert in Dublin).

I'd been dissapointed with the audio pumping & sucking back at moments when the band was surely doing the opposite (a JVC domestic player). Knowing too well that this is typical of having the player's internal dynamic range set to "TV Mode" or similar, yet I'd left mine set to "Normal" mode, I switched it to "Wide" mode instead (meaning wide dynamic range, not stereo image).

Presto! "Wide" is actually full range, whereas "Normal" is simply a medium setting. Now, I'm sure this is all familiar to many but check yours, ensure it's actually on full range and not a misnomer of a "normal" setting, and enjoy dynamic range again - at least akin to the disc's mastering limits....
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minister

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Re: Yahoo helps expose Loudness war issues to the masses
« Reply #2 on: July 10, 2007, 08:52:44 pm »

Adam Dempsey wrote on Tue, 10 July 2007 17:48

FWIW, talking with Jack here yesterday about dynamic range on music DVD video and it gave me reason to go home and try again with David Bowie's "Reality" tour DVD (great show, and all from the one concert in Dublin).

I'd been dissapointed with the audio pumping & sucking back at moments when the band was surely doing the opposite (a JVC domestic player). Knowing too well that this is typical of having the player's internal dynamic range set to "TV Mode" or similar, yet I'd left mine set to "Normal" mode, I switched it to "Wide" mode instead (meaning wide dynamic range, not stereo image).

Presto! "Wide" is actually full range, whereas "Normal" is simply a medium setting. Now, I'm sure this is all familiar to many but check yours, ensure it's actually on full range and not a misnomer of a "normal" setting, and enjoy dynamic range again - at least akin to the disc's mastering limits....


DVD manufacturers have done a disservice to everyone by doing this.  what you discovered is : WIDE IS OFF, NO DRC (Dynamic Range Control).  I have learned this form mixing and masterion several concert DVD's and had the producers calling me saying it sounds terrible on their systems.

RF mode even on you Mac can be a huge problem.  i wish they would leave it defaulted to OFF and only engage it if you know you want to.  It is is kina like the SPORTS and VIVID and FILM settings on your TV for the color scheme.  blech!

So often times it is not the encoders fault, but the idiocy of the decode implementation.

Clipping is the new BLACK; Wide is the new OFF.
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