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Author Topic: Building a Piano Riser  (Read 4003 times)

leeberkgrad08

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Building a Piano Riser
« on: May 22, 2007, 11:07:41 am »

We just got a steinway b piano, and our studio has concrete floors.  We were advised by a piano tech that the piano's humidity would be more stable if the piano was off the concrete and on hardwood.  We also noticed some odd harmonics coming off the concrete from under the piano.  Does any one have any advice on building a hardwood riser for a piano?  Wheels for mobility would be great but are not vital at this stage.  


 -Adrian Olsen
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franman

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Re: Building a Piano Riser
« Reply #1 on: May 23, 2007, 10:30:54 pm »

I've got wonderful Grand Pianos in at least three large Live Rooms with Concrete floors.. we've never had anybody have any issues with the floor surface before... It's a solid reflective surface and although it's not a 'warm' a reflection as wood, the solid nature or the reflective floor should provide nice reinforcing of the Piano for peformance and recording...

my 10 cents...

I think a riser would be more prone to causing resonance issues UNLESS it was built very heavy and solid (many layers). I also can say that I've never seen a piano on a riser in a studio... hmmm

Obviously in a concert hall, the stage is more often than not, wood but it is also typically very sturdy... I'm just not down with the riser idea...
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Francis Manzella - President, FM Design Ltd.
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Wes Lachot

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Re: Building a Piano Riser
« Reply #2 on: May 24, 2007, 11:52:53 am »

Adrian,

Here's what you need to protect your piano from humidity extremes: http://www.dampp-chaser.com/

I've had Dampp-Chasers installed in both of my pianos for years, and I recommend them to all of my clients. You'll find that you need to tune the piano much less often, which is better for the pin-block, since after so many tunings in its lifetime, a piano will often need to be rebuilt using larger tuning pins.

Fran is absolutely right about concrete floors sounding good for grand pianos. Plus, you'll want to be able to roll the piano around to accommodate various miking scenarios (you should have the piano mounted on a piano dolly, by the way, to reduce the stresses caused by the three legs moving independently when you roll it around).

Congratulations on your piano purchase.

--Wes
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leeberkgrad08

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Re: Building a Piano Riser
« Reply #3 on: May 26, 2007, 01:09:12 pm »

Thanks to you both for your responses.  This is great news, a lot less work for us..

 Cheers,

  -A
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