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Author Topic: Ceiling fan as a diffuser?  (Read 3048 times)

Michael Nielsen

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Ceiling fan as a diffuser?
« on: May 22, 2007, 02:11:33 am »

I'm moving my studio into a 17' x 13' room with 8' ceilings.  There is already a ceiling fan there direcly above where I want to put my chair.  Will the fan (when it's off) act as a diffuser?  Or am I better off sweating it out, and uninstalling the fan?
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Ethan Winer

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Re: Ceiling fan as a diffuser?
« Reply #1 on: May 22, 2007, 10:13:29 am »

Michael,

Quote:

a ceiling fan there direcly above where I want to put my chair.


The ceiling first reflection point is halfway between your ears and the tweeters, not directly overhead. So unless the fan is really large, or it rattles etc, it's probably fine there.

--Ethan

Michael Nielsen

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Re: Ceiling fan as a diffuser?
« Reply #2 on: May 22, 2007, 10:18:54 am »

Oh, thanks Ethan.  I was looking at your page.  Do you still make the Soffit Traps?
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Ethan Winer

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Re: Ceiling fan as a diffuser?
« Reply #3 on: May 23, 2007, 05:00:11 pm »

Michael,

> Do you still make the Soffit Traps? <

We discontinued them a while back because they didn't sell as well as we hoped. Everyone loved the idea! But not many bought them. Also, I often found myself trying to talk people out of buying them because all rooms need broadband absorption, not just bass trapping. So when it was time for us to buy more of the casing material we decided to drop them instead.

--Ethan

franman

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Re: Ceiling fan as a diffuser?
« Reply #4 on: May 23, 2007, 10:27:18 pm »

Also... beware of the flanging effect a fan can have if it is in the reflection zone... we've covered this before, but the air movement from a ceiling fan can be quite audible along with the 'moving target' of a first reflection causing a moving comb filter (kinda the definition of a flange).... Evil or Very Mad
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Francis Manzella - President, FM Design Ltd.
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Michael Nielsen

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Re: Ceiling fan as a diffuser?
« Reply #5 on: May 24, 2007, 04:27:52 am »

Thanks guys.  

I wouldn't do any critical listening with the fan on, but I live in Valencia CA, and it gets HOT!!!

The first time I sat down and played acoustic guitar in my current studio room with the fan on, I almost went cross-eyed.  Until I realized that the ceiling fan was freaking out the sound.
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Scott Selfridge

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Re: Ceiling fan as a diffuser?
« Reply #6 on: June 01, 2007, 01:52:31 pm »

franman wrote on Wed, 23 May 2007 19:27

Also... beware of the flanging effect a fan can have if it is in the reflection zone... we've covered this before, but the air movement from a ceiling fan can be quite audible along with the 'moving target' of a first reflection causing a moving comb filter (kinda the definition of a flange).... Evil or Very Mad
I have a large cement pillar that runs straight over and behind my mix position.  It has a flanging effect when you move side to side, sitting underneath it.
I'm planning on building a large 4" bass trap above the mix position to take care of that and the big peak at 130hz and a dip at 80hz....The entire sealing is covered in acoustic tiling. It used to be a Highschool class room.
Any suggestions?  Am I on the right track?
-Scott
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franman

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Re: Ceiling fan as a diffuser?
« Reply #7 on: June 03, 2007, 10:02:19 pm »

sounds like you're hearing a comb filter as you move around this source of early reflections.. cover it with at least 4" (6" would be better) between your listening position and the 'comb filter source'... make sense??
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Francis Manzella - President, FM Design Ltd.
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fmdesign.com
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