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Author Topic: balanced stereo signal from stage  (Read 1085 times)

dobster

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balanced stereo signal from stage
« on: April 12, 2007, 02:19:26 pm »

im using a cd player from stage in my performance. whats the best way to send its signal stereo to the board/PA?

i thought to use a single trs cable from the cd headphone or line out into DI with stereo outputs, into the board.
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Andy Peters

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Re: balanced stereo signal from stage
« Reply #1 on: April 12, 2007, 03:10:44 pm »

dobster wrote on Thu, 12 April 2007 11:19

im using a cd player from stage in my performance. whats the best way to send its signal stereo to the board/PA?

i thought to use a single trs cable from the cd headphone or line out into DI with stereo outputs, into the board.


A pair of DIs will do ya fine.  Whirlwind makes something called the "PCDI" which has two RCA jack inputs and a 1/8" TRS jack input (eases the adapter mess) and it works well.

-a
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dobster

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Re: balanced stereo signal from stage
« Reply #2 on: April 12, 2007, 03:21:03 pm »

thanks andy. a certain somebody called me "nuts" for this idea and said it would sound bad through DI. so i called him nuts right back lol

ill check out whirlwind...
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Andy Peters

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Re: balanced stereo signal from stage
« Reply #3 on: April 13, 2007, 07:15:26 pm »

dobster wrote on Thu, 12 April 2007 12:21

thanks andy. a certain somebody called me "nuts" for this idea and said it would sound bad through DI. so i called him nuts right back lol


It's the standard way of doing it.

a) you can lift a ground to prevent buzzes,

b) balanced lines through the snake are your friends,

c) impedance matching prevents the console mic input (which is what the snake is usually patched into) from loading down the CD player outputs (and consumer CD players usually have a higher-than-you'd-expect output impedance),

d) voltage step-down in the DI transformer (a function of the transformation, if you will) helps match the CD player's output level to the mic input so you don't overload.

-a
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