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Author Topic: Advice on bringing focus to my room  (Read 2056 times)

rollmottle

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Advice on bringing focus to my room
« on: March 22, 2007, 03:11:12 am »

hey treatment experts...

without getting technical (because i don't know how to!) - i'm finding that my room lacks focus and i'm not getting the clarity that i should be getting in my room. majority of the time in this room is spent mixing. i've come to the conclusion that i probably need to treat my room to help focus the sound. i have gathered materials for building absorbers from rigid fiberglass and now the more and more i think about it, the more i don't know what i should build where. and this is where your advice comes in!

my room is 14 1/2 feet long, 10 1/2 feet wide, and 8 feet tall. the monitors fire lengthwise from the back wall into the rest of the room.

my rig sits about a foot and a half from the back wall. in the right corner, is a closet a door. about a foot or two from the closet door in the back wall is a 27" x 48" window. in the left corner, my subwoofer sits at the tri-corner (this is really the only practical place in the room that it can go...also, i'm not finding bass to be an issue). above the subwoofer, is my homemade pegboard cable hanging system. in the back left corner, a 5 1/2 foot tall x 6 foot long x 1 foot deep shelf unit filled with LPs extends into the corner. a tv sits on top of the shelf in the corner filling the space between the top of the shelf and the ceiling. the back right corner, there is the entrance door. so, long story short, the space in 3 of 4 my corners are occupied from the floor to 6 feet up, and 1 is filled all the way to the ceiling. should i treat the open corners with some tri-corner absorbers?? bass isn't really my issue, but might these help? this is my first point of confusion.

in the middle of the right wall to the right of my rig is a 7 foot tall by 5 foot wide x 1 1/2 foot deep wood faced murphy bed. i believe this is definitley part of the problem and my plan was to place absorbers all along the face of it.

so aside from the murphy bed, i thought maybe i should try to treat the back wall, window, and the face of the closet door in the corner with absorbers. then i thought maybe i should build 2 - 4 large moveable absorbers to place behind the speakers and rig in front of the back wall.then i thought, maybe i should build a series of panels from the ceiling above my listening position down to the back wall.

so i guess i don't know what my best course of action is. i've been poring over these forums and all the internet acoustic treatment hotspots and i'm a bit lost. what would generally get me best results? i'm sure anything will help, but any advice from you guys would be greatly appreciated.

cheers!
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Tom C

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Re: Advice on bringing focus to my room
« Reply #1 on: March 22, 2007, 04:23:05 am »


A drawing or photo of the room would help a lot.

Tom

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rollmottle

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Re: Advice on bringing focus to my room
« Reply #2 on: March 22, 2007, 02:19:09 pm »

yeah! i figured that would have been more helpful...

roughly to scale...looks a lot bigger than it actually is! thanks guys.

index.php/fa/4625/0/
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jetbase

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Re: Advice on bringing focus to my room
« Reply #3 on: March 22, 2007, 06:48:48 pm »

It looks to me like you need to treat reflections. If you sit in the mix position & get someone to run a small mirror along the front & side walls & ceiling, everywhere you can see a speaker in the mirror is where you should put some absorption. On my front wall I actually use a thick velvet curtain when mixing (It can be opened to see out the window), which really helps focus the stereo image & has the added psychological effect of making me feel like I'm listening to music in a theatre.

Once you treat these reflections you may notice any low end problems in your room a bit more. If so, search this forum for bass traps.
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Bill_Urick

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Re: Advice on bringing focus to my room
« Reply #4 on: March 22, 2007, 08:12:22 pm »

Your overall situation is comparable to mine. Working on that right now. In addition to the excellent advice you receive here, check out Ethan Winers page: http://www.realtraps.com/art_room-setup.htm The first thing I did was to relocate the listening position to the prescribed 38% off the front wall. That by itself seemed to make a noticeable difference. Good luck!
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Tom C

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Re: Advice on bringing focus to my room
« Reply #5 on: March 23, 2007, 04:49:31 pm »

As jetbase mentioned I'd first handle the first reflections,
Ethan has a nice article on his site on how do to this.
Don't forget the ceiling.

To make this a bit more easy I'd move your rig a bit further into
the room so that your first reflections on the right side are NOT
at the closed door so you can place absorbers at the wall between
that door and the bed.

Now you'll have some place in the front of you desk for the
sub-woofer (sub-woofer in corner = bad).

The now free corner is a good place for some bass trapping, and
even the small space between the door and the front wall can be
used for that.

I would move the LP shelf in the middle of the wall and add
broadband absorbtion to both sides (judging from your drawing
4" should be possible.

And if you've still some time and money left the ceiling/front
wall and ceiling/back wall corners have some place for traps,
too.

Tom




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rollmottle

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Re: Advice on bringing focus to my room
« Reply #6 on: March 23, 2007, 04:59:40 pm »

Tom C wrote on Fri, 23 March 2007 13:49

As jetbase mentioned I'd first handle the first reflections,
Ethan has a nice article on his site on how do to this.
Don't forget the ceiling.

To make this a bit more easy I'd move your rig a bit further into
the room so that your first reflections on the right side are NOT
at the closed door so you can place absorbers at the wall between
that door and the bed.

Now you'll have some place in the front of you desk for the
sub-woofer (sub-woofer in corner = bad).

The now free corner is a good place for some bass trapping, and
even the small space between the door and the front wall can be
used for that.

I would move the LP shelf in the middle of the wall and add
broadband absorbtion to both sides (judging from your drawing
4" should be possible.

And if you've still some time and money left the ceiling/front
wall and ceiling/back wall corners have some place for traps,
too.

Tom







thanks for the replies so far guys...

yeah, i've pulled the rig out about a foot more (up to the edge where i can still pull down the murphy bed...luckily this puts my listening position right at 38% of the room per Bill's advice per Ethan's article) i also figured i'd pull the sub out from the corner and behind the rig.  there's a small wire/kitchen type shelf in the space between the bed and closet door. so that's getting moved so i can put a large trap there.

good advice on moving the LP shelf too.

this is all going to take some heavy lifting!

considering the very limited space in the corners (there's literally 4 inches from the thick molding of the doors to the corners - i live in an old house) how would i go about treating these corners effectively?
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franman

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Re: Advice on bringing focus to my room
« Reply #7 on: March 29, 2007, 08:00:49 pm »

yep.. "my boys" have this one under control!! Good advice everyone...
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rollmottle

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Re: Advice on bringing focus to my room
« Reply #8 on: March 31, 2007, 11:12:20 pm »

franman wrote on Thu, 29 March 2007 17:00

yep.. "my boys" have this one under control!! Good advice everyone...


yes! thanks so much everybody. i think i have completed the bulk of what i will be doing to my room.

my room sounds a million times better! i can hear detail i wasn't able to hear before and the soundstage is much better defined. my goto reference records are vinyl copies of "dark side of the moon" and radiohead's "ok computer"...love being able to hear all the great reverbs without having to put on phones.

i thrashed some of the walls hanging the panels so i decided not to install the overhead panel (i'm renting). instead i put it lengthwise in front of my rig leaning against the wall at a 45 degree angle. it's basically in the same position and angle as the one i would have hung, except it's on the floor. is this adviseable?

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franman

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Re: Advice on bringing focus to my room
« Reply #9 on: April 01, 2007, 09:55:44 pm »

Glad things are working out for you. With regards to using the panel against the front wall on the floor, it will create some trapping, but it's (obviously) not helping control the early reflection off the ceiling. In this regards, the overhead position would be more effective....
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