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Author Topic: "Rites of Passage" -- a photograph  (Read 2341 times)

Barry Hufker

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"Rites of Passage" -- a photograph
« on: March 01, 2007, 12:37:11 am »

Nina Berman's photo of Iraq veteran Ty Ziegel and his wife, Renee Kline, won a first prize in the portraits category in the 2007 World Press photo awards announced Friday.

This image has not been re-touched or "photo-shopped".


index.php/fa/4405/0/
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Fox

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Re: "Rites of Passage" -- a photograph
« Reply #1 on: March 01, 2007, 08:47:04 am »

I don't know how to respond to this... Sad
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maxdimario

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Re: "Rites of Passage" -- a photograph
« Reply #2 on: March 01, 2007, 10:10:19 am »

people are not supposed to see this..

there are hundreds in similar circumstances, I am sure..

The only thing you see on TEE VEE is trucks, rockets, planes... the stuff unassuming kids love to see.

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Jessica A. Engle

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Re: "Rites of Passage" -- a photograph
« Reply #3 on: March 01, 2007, 10:48:52 am »

maxdimario wrote on Thu, 01 March 2007 09:10

people are not supposed to see this..

there are hundreds in similar circumstances, I am sure..




I first learned about this issue from the community access station where I work; it is an article about the effects of depleted uranium (DU) used in American weapons in Iraq on newborns:

http://newstandardnews.net/content/index.cfm/items/1755

If you are very brave, take a look at some photos here, taken from the Gulf War where depleted uranium was also used:
http://www.tetrahedron.org/articles/gulf_war_syndrome/uraniu m_infanticide.html

Be forewarned, these photos are EXTREMELY DISTURBING AND GRAPHIC, which is why they are linked and not posted.  It makes me ashamed to think the United States military is responsible for such an atrocity.  

-Jessica

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Barry Hufker

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Re: "Rites of Passage" -- a photograph
« Reply #4 on: March 01, 2007, 11:26:31 am »

Words don't do justice in describing the horror for those children and their families.  Even "horror" is an over-used word that doesn't come anywhere near the reality.

Barry
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Fox

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Re: "Rites of Passage" -- a photograph
« Reply #5 on: March 01, 2007, 12:10:40 pm »

This is way too shitty...something needs to be done.
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Oldfart

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Re: "Rites of Passage" -- a photograph
« Reply #6 on: March 01, 2007, 01:03:02 pm »

Jessica A. Engle wrote on Thu, 01 March 2007 10:48

maxdimario wrote on Thu, 01 March 2007 09:10

people are not supposed to see this..

there are hundreds in similar circumstances, I am sure..




I first learned about this issue from the community access station where I work; it is an article about the effects of depleted uranium (DU) used in American weapons in Iraq on newborns:

http://newstandardnews.net/content/index.cfm/items/1755

If you are very brave, take a look at some photos here, taken from the Gulf War where depleted uranium was also used:
 http://www.tetrahedron.org/articles/gulf_war_syndrome/uraniu m_infanticide.html

Be forewarned, these photos are EXTREMELY DISTURBING AND GRAPHIC, which is why they are linked and not posted.  It makes me ashamed to think the United States military is responsible for such an atrocity.  

-Jessica





I'm ashamed to admit this ......... I couldn't bare to watch it all  (I closed the window before I got to the bottow of the page)


And to my fellow canadians, WE as NATO allies used DU (made shells) as weapons in Kosovo !!!!

Still feel good about being a canuck??


Oldfart
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Denis Paquette

Tidewater

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Re: "Rites of Passage" -- a photograph
« Reply #7 on: March 01, 2007, 01:12:28 pm »

I stand with my hand over my heart for Ty Ziegel.

Look at him in his uniform.

God bless him.

The story is courage, and personal sacrifice.

Please don't whore this Marine.

I am not worthy.


M
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Time Magazine's 2007 Man of the Year

Barry Hufker

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Re: "Rites of Passage" -- a photograph
« Reply #8 on: March 01, 2007, 01:53:14 pm »

I certainly don't want to exploit this couple.  And I don't think anyone is.  For me, this portrait captures this moment in history. Just as the painting American Gothic has become an icon, this may as well.

His loyalty to his country.  Her loyalty to him.  His obvious love, almost fearful love.  Her sense of fear and of being totally overwhelmed by what is ahead.  It is an amazing photograph.

Barry
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Jessica A. Engle

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Re: "Rites of Passage" -- a photograph
« Reply #9 on: March 01, 2007, 05:35:57 pm »

Tidewater wrote on Thu, 01 March 2007 12:12


Look at him in his uniform.

God bless him.

The story is courage, and personal sacrifice.

Please don't whore this Marine.

M


I don't think anyone was trying to downplay what is happening in this photo, or use it to peddle some agenda.

What I like most about this photograph is that the uniform is not the important part of the picture.  It is the man that is worth looking at.  

Do you think anyone cares about all that metal on his chest?  It is my hope that they would care instead about what's going on in his heart.... and if you can use a photograph to make someone connect with another human being then I say show it to the whole ruddy world.  

God knows it couldn't hurt for us to understand each other's pain a little better.  Maybe then we wouldn't hate so much.
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Socrates

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Re: "Rites of Passage" -- a photograph
« Reply #10 on: March 01, 2007, 07:43:11 pm »

I stand in awe, respect, and gratitude for a courageous and honorable man who has paid a high price indeed for his willingness to serve his country in a time of war.

I did some googling and saw that his community in san antonio texas had been working to re-model his home in anticipation of his return from the hospital.

I wish him god's blessing and hope that his burden may be lessened with the love and help of those around him.

***


The photo looks to me to be right on the border of political commentary, and I thought it might be staged since he was wearing his dress blues without his cap, but I think that the viewer can bring to it whatever perspective they want. A photo with a proud wife and the community that supports him would present an entirely different message--one I found by reading about his situation.  Here he appears to be ashamed and his wife surprised and horrified--that might comprise some moments of their lives, but not the only totality or even majority.

My intial response was pity and revulsion, and I needed to think about the context and look beneath the surface to see what I hope is a proud man and a proud family, community, and country supporting him. If they have the courage to serve, we owe them the courage to see them, accept them, be proud of them, and help them when they return.

I don't think the attempt to occupy and re-build Iraq was the best way for us to fight terrorism, but the gift the soldiers give us in their willing to risk life and limb is not dependent on some big-picture evaluation on how righteous a particular war is. He is part of the tradition of military service in the Southern States that we all benefit from. Their sacrifice pays for our freedom.
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"No joke, you are the problem. YOU. your voice, your words, your ideas, your actions, stop!! Stop please!!"

Socrates

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Re: "Rites of Passage" -- a photograph
« Reply #11 on: March 01, 2007, 07:46:46 pm »

(KSDK) - In their recent marriage vows, they promised to love one another in sickness and in health. For Tyler and Renee Ziegel somehow that pledge seems a bit superfluous.


They started dating after Ty, a Marine, got home from boot camp.

"He had a great personality. We got along really well," said Renee.

But then Ty was off to Iraq.

"I'm a combat engineer," he said. "We do construction and demolition."

He was there in the spring of 2003, when the war began and when he returned home safely several months later, he was determined to make Renee his bride.

"He called the local florist and had them deliver two roses every hour for three hours," Renee remembered. "And then he had six more delivered right after that. Then he came over got down on one knee and opened a little ring box and said, 'I owe you one engagement ring.'"

They were looking toward the future when Ty's unit was redeployed.

Then one day in December 2004, Ty was on a truck as part of a convoy patrolling in Iraq's Anbar province when they were targeted by a suicide bomber.

"I just remember not seeing and felt like getting hit in the face with a baseball bat," said Ty. "The next thing I remember is just sitting down just yelling in pain."

Renee knew something was up when she got a call to come to his parents house.

"So then I'm in tears" said Renee. "I don't know why. I'm just bawling for no reason because I didn't know if he was hurt or surprising me."

Ty was hurt, badly. The blast engulfed him in flames and riddled his brain with shrapnel.

He was stabilized and transported to Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio. Renee went there too and doctors told her Ty was clinging to life.

"If he makes it through today, it's a good day. If he makes it through tonight, it's a good night. We got told that every single day," said Renee.

Ty fought hard and did make it but he was disfigured beyond recognition. He lost sight in his right eye and doctors had to remove most of his left arm and some of his right hand.

But through 50 plus surgeries, 19 months of painful rehabilitation and disfiguring scars, Renee stood by him.

"I didn't marry him because he was a good looking guy, I married him because of who he was," said Renee.

The Ziegels are now back home in Washington, Ill.

Ty, who used to love to repair and rebuild engines, has a new truck and may still one day want to open his own shop.

He admits people do stare but he doesn't really mind.

"If I were you and you me, I would look at you," he said. "I would check you out and I'd be like, 'Hey, what's going on with this guy here?"

And last month, Ty and Renee kept their promise to each other and finally got married.

"It was a party. I had a bunch of Marine buddies there and everybody, and we owned that place for a while," said Ty.

Their bond has already passed an ultimate test.

Ty and Renee Ziegel see love not with their eyes but with their heart.

"If you love somebody," said Renee, "you're going to do what you have to do, no matter what."

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"No joke, you are the problem. YOU. your voice, your words, your ideas, your actions, stop!! Stop please!!"

Les Ismore

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Re: "Rites of Passage" -- a photograph
« Reply #12 on: March 02, 2007, 12:52:51 am »

Sometimes dying is the easy way. I was in a pain rehabilitaion center once with a burn victim. He had no nose, ears, hair, or chin, and only two fingers on the remaining one arm. He was in constant agony from the burnt skin. Unbelievable to most of us. Then on top of it all, he would get treated like something out of a horror film in public. He still somehow managed to remain upbeat and positive because he said he had to.
Reminds us all to appreciate the things we take for granted.
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Tidewater

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Re: "Rites of Passage" -- a photograph
« Reply #13 on: March 02, 2007, 12:56:25 am »

Sorry fellas, I was moved more than just a little, and the atmosphere is a little thick around here sometimes.

You know.. uhh.. there are times when you just want to walk up and hug someone, to tell them it will be alright..

In this situation, I wish they would hug me.

Peace.


M
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Time Magazine's 2007 Man of the Year
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