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Author Topic: diffusers near sound sources  (Read 1700 times)

jetbase

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diffusers near sound sources
« on: October 12, 2006, 02:40:57 am »

i've seen a few pictures of studio control rooms where there are quadratic diffusers that appear to be either beside or behind the speakers. just wondering what the principle is behind doing this & if it can be applied to recording (e.g. putting diffusers next to or behind a cello in a hall). what would be the benefits & disadvantages?

thanks,
glenn
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jwhynot: "There's a difference between thinking or acting dogmatically and drawing from experience."


Glenn Santry
http://www.myspace.com/glennsantry

BR audio

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Re: diffusers near sound sources
« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2006, 08:55:52 pm »

Hi Glenn,

Usually on the side walls close to the speakers to minimize reflections however still keeping some energy in the room.  Some say it also helps with imaging.

The benefits are basically what is written above.  Recording a source, such as Piano, Drums or really anything else close to a diffuse field will sound a little more natural (for the lack of a better term), and not so dead (again overused term) as in entirelly absorptive spaces.

I hate to be so blunt, but just try recording in diffent places in a room and find the perfect spot for that instrument/song/style and etc..

Hope it helps
Gil
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jetbase

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Re: diffusers near sound sources
« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2006, 09:19:53 pm »

Hi Gil, thanks for the reply. My question was actually partly sparked by Francis stating in other threads the phase problems with having some diffusers being too close behind the listening position. Years ago I used to assist an engineer who had a set of QRD's that we sometimes took out on location recordings, either for use in a makeshift control room or to put behind certain instruments (if needed). The said engineer knows his stuff, which is probably why it always "worked", but from my point of view I heard the benefits but did not know of any possible drawbacks. So, from what you're saying, the advantage of diffusers is that they keep the energy in the room while doing their biz. I'm guessing that a mic would have to be a certain distance away for it to be effective, otherwise there would be phase problems, or am I misunderstanding Francis' original statement?

Quote:

I hate to be so blunt, but just try recording in diffent places in a room and find the perfect spot for that instrument/song/style and etc..


I understand & do all that. I'm just trying to understand a little more about this particular type of application.

Thanks again.
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sleep is not an option

jwhynot: "There's a difference between thinking or acting dogmatically and drawing from experience."


Glenn Santry
http://www.myspace.com/glennsantry
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