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Author Topic: 5.1 and stereo room  (Read 1356 times)

Yannick Willox

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5.1 and stereo room
« on: October 11, 2006, 06:29:44 am »

Hello,

just some questions about future plans. I intend to move to a new location. I currently have one good editing/mastering room (classical) (4mx5.6mx2.6m)

This is too small, mainly because of surround work (5.1 only).

Q1. should a mastering studio be a box, to approximate end user environment ?
Q2. How do you put a 5.1 setup in a box, in the usual (stereo firing into the long dimension) way ? Either the room is too narrow (110 degrees for the rear speakers), OR the room is too deep, OR the ratios are all wrong.
Q3. A room with non parallel side walls solves the surround speaker  issues. But can this translate well from a mastering standpoint (remember, we do not mix here - mastering is the keyword here) ?

I have visited Polyhymnia (in the Netherlands) and they sure have two great rooms - rectangular and quite big - and they sound great.

Being used to natural acoustics and great concert halls (old and new) I find the shoebox type halls to sound more natural. Modern halls with their non parallel side walls/ceiling do not work for me.
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Yannick Willox
Acoustic Recording Service

franman

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Re: 5.1 and stereo room
« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2006, 10:57:54 pm »

Yannick Willox wrote on Wed, 11 October 2006 06:29

Hello,

just some questions about future plans. I intend to move to a new location. I currently have one good editing/mastering room (classical) (4mx5.6mx2.6m)

This is too small, mainly because of surround work (5.1 only).

Q1. should a mastering studio be a box, to approximate end user environment ?
Q2. How do you put a 5.1 setup in a box, in the usual (stereo firing into the long dimension) way ? Either the room is too narrow (110 degrees for the rear speakers), OR the room is too deep, OR the ratios are all wrong.
Q3. A room with non parallel side walls solves the surround speaker  issues. But can this translate well from a mastering standpoint (remember, we do not mix here - mastering is the keyword here) ?

I have visited Polyhymnia (in the Netherlands) and they sure have two great rooms - rectangular and quite big - and they sound great.

Being used to natural acoustics and great concert halls (old and new) I find the shoebox type halls to sound more natural. Modern halls with their non parallel side walls/ceiling do not work for me.


A1..most of our mastering studios start out as rectangles.. They do of course, need to be large enough and have working proportions.

A2.. see A1.. rectangle needs to be large enough to support 5.1 setup with equidistant speaker placement...

A3... we have built some very succesful mastering suites with non-parallel side walls (trapezoidal). It just makes the LF prediction more 'interesting'... You have to do more calculations of the different room size to be comfortable with your size decisions...
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