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Author Topic: Ductwork  (Read 2200 times)

Ryan Massey

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Ductwork
« on: August 28, 2006, 07:34:55 pm »

Ok-
So this strays from room acoustics a bit, but I think it is on topic enough to make sense here...
My facility includes both rehearsal rooms and a good sized recording studio.  In general, the construction on the place was very well thought out and bleed problems are minimal.  However, I think I could improve things further by dealing with what seems like the achilies heel of the soundproofing scheme- which is the ductwork.  The pipes are all insulated, but the rectangular metal boxes that go into the rooms are not.  Open the included JPG to see what I mean (Sorry about the dim camera phone shot).  I am thinking I could build something around these boxes and greatly increase the room to room isolation.  Like I said, it has never really been a problem, but I would love to get as close to 0 transmission as is feasible.  Thanks for any suggestions!  Cheers,
Ryan
ps.  It's nice to have a guest moderator around to stir things up again!

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Teddy G.

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Re: Ductwork
« Reply #1 on: August 28, 2006, 07:54:31 pm »

Just posting a "lightened" version of your ductwork - hope you don't mind? I also think it's right-on-topic - a very important part of the "system", ey?

Teddy G.
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franman

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Re: Ductwork
« Reply #2 on: August 29, 2006, 12:22:57 pm »

Teddy,

Yep, ductwork is a big part of the acoustic design process... So, if you feel that you are getting a lot of sound transmission at the plenum boxes that connect to your rooms, because they are not insulated there are a couple of things you can do.

1. You can "Lag" the boxes. This is adding some massive material to the outside of the box to increase it's mass and therefore, it's STC. Lead sheeting is sometimes used but you can use drywall and attach it with coarse thread drywall screws and construction adheasive to the outside of the sheetmetal.

2. After lagging, insulate the plenum box with some duct insulation or foil backed R11 batt.

3. Ideally!! all studio duct work in "Lined with acoustic duct liner board not less than 1" thick"  (from our mechanical specifications). Sometimes we use thicker but AT LEAST 1" duct liner is our min spec... This is better than outside insulation as it stops the sound from reverberating and bouncing around inside the duct and quiets machine and air noise to some degree.

But, given the existing situation at your place, I would do 1 and 2 above... see how much it helps and let us know.

FM
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Ryan Massey

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Re: Ductwork
« Reply #3 on: August 29, 2006, 03:14:23 pm »

Quote:

But, given the existing situation at your place, I would do 1 and 2 above... see how much it helps and let us know.


Aye, aye captain!  Seriously, I'm going to do this early next week.  I'll report back with my findings.  Cheers,
Ryan
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Fibes

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Re: Ductwork
« Reply #4 on: August 31, 2006, 02:56:13 pm »

Ditto Fran. And the occasional baffle withing the plenum mad eof duct board can help too.

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Fibes
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