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Sorbothane

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DanDan:
I would like to get a ball hopping here....
In general I have a speaker on a stand in mind, furthermore one might want to decouple the stand from the floor. So any decoupling situation will do but I used the title Sorbo deliberately to steer away from springs and such.
How do the various viscoelastic products compare?
Sorbothane, Neoprene, EPDM? etc.
What is the performance figure? Durometer?
What is the optimum % compression.
Is there an advantage in a cone or hemisphere?
Does anyone have links to the manufacturers tech data?
Links to sources of supply, worldwide?
DD

Genfan:
Sorbothane and other neoprene products work amazingly well but MUST be used by applying the appropriate math otherwise you're wasting your money. We use Sorbothane and products from Mason Industries for various de-coupling. Simple searches will get you to these manufacturer's websites and they all have extensive product support to figure out what specific products, durometers and quantities you need---if you don't want to use their literature and calculate yourself their product support people will help you; just call (or hire me!). Don't fool around and use something generic.

boggy:

--- Quote from: Genfan on June 18, 2011, 12:04:58 PM ---Sorbothane and other neoprene products work amazingly well but MUST be used by applying the appropriate math otherwise you're wasting your money. ................

--- End quote ---
I agree absolutely.

couple of hints:
- Resonant frequency of complete system (loudspeaker + stand + neoprene) must be well below working frequency (of loudspeaker)...
- Loudspeakers have mostly forward/backward LF vibrations... not upward/downward (or left/right)...

Links?
Here are useful one (IMHO) http://www.vibrationmounts.com/Products1.htm

Best regards,

[email protected]:
Another link:

http://www.mecanocaucho.com/en/productos.php

We work with these guys for all anti-vibration mounts etc.

You can ask them custom systems - they will design it for you or you can calculate yourself and they will just build it to specs.

PS: if needed I can briefly explain how the maths behind decoupling work.

franman:
one more:
http://www.sorbothane.com/design-guide.php

This is the material we use all the time for decoupling larger speakers. Calculator is easy to use... note, yes loudspeakers have front-back movement, but the static load is presented along the line of the center of gravity which is typically up and down. The pads will be in compression from the static load along the line of the center of gravity. The calculator will help you determine the amount of compression but I typically start out at around 20%....

FM

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