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Author Topic: More theory, less technique  (Read 3000 times)

copperx

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More theory, less technique
« on: April 17, 2006, 06:26:54 pm »

I feel like I've hit a wall trying to learn theory from forums. So far they have been a GREAT resource; I've learned immensely from them “how” to accomplish objectives (e.g. recording drums, getting a better guitar recording). I’ve acquired a big bag of techniques but I don’t know “why” some work and some don’t. I am limited by the number of techniques I know, and while I could come up with new techniques through experimentation, I feel that I would be better guided if I had a solid grasp on basic sound and electrical concepts.

I would be grateful if somebody could recommend some helpful books to me (math-oriented books are OK).
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idylldon

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Re: More theory, less technique
« Reply #1 on: April 17, 2006, 11:08:37 pm »

Quote:

I feel that I would be better guided if I had a solid grasp on basic sound and electrical concepts.

I would be grateful if somebody could recommend some helpful books to me (math-oriented books are OK).



To understand the way sound functions in the environment it's created in, try:

Everest, F. Alton.  The Master Handbook of Acoustics. 2nd ed.

For in-depth discussions on all types of electronics from tubes to how they work in a studio, the well-respected Radiotron's Designer's Handbook will give you a lifetime of reference material.  Some of it might be a bit dated, but there's still much contained in this volume that is very relevant.  

For a more thorough dicsussion of electronics and how it relates to audio, the bible is still Audio Cyclopedia by Tremaine.  

There are also a ton of newer books, but I find that no matter what I'm presently reading I still consult the above on a regular basis to help me understand that which seems opague.

Cheers,
--
Don

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nutonestudio

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Re: More theory, less technique
« Reply #2 on: April 18, 2006, 05:32:05 am »

My favorite theory book is 'Tonmeister Technology' by Michael Dickreiter.

It can be a tough read due to a poor German to English translation but if you read each sentence a couple times, it makes sense and has tons of great info...

willie
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CWHumphrey

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Re: More theory, less technique
« Reply #3 on: April 18, 2006, 06:18:35 am »

Try "Handbook of Recording Engineering" by John Eargle.  I loaned this to someone 12 years and never got it back.  This book more than covers the why.

Cheers,

Carter William Humphrey
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Carter William Humphrey

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jimmyjazz

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Re: More theory, less technique
« Reply #4 on: April 28, 2006, 02:28:10 am »

I don't think you can really appreciate studio acoustics without a firm grasp of the science of sound.  My favorite texts are the various versions by Kinsler, Frey, Coppens, and Sanders.
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Samc

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Re: More theory and techniques, and less tricks
« Reply #5 on: May 01, 2006, 06:48:34 am »

copperx wrote on Mon, 17 April 2006 23:26

I feel like I've hit a wall trying to learn theory from forums. So far they have been a GREAT resource; I've learned immensely from them ?how? to accomplish objectives (e.g. recording drums, getting a better guitar recording). I?ve acquired a big bag of techniques but I don?t know ?why? some work and some don?t. I am limited by the number of techniques I know, and while I could come up with new techniques through experimentation, I feel that I would be better guided if I had a solid grasp on basic sound and electrical concepts.......

You sir are a rare bird, and obviously a smart one at that.  Knowing all the tricks in the book is useless to someone who does not have at least, some knowledge of the theory, principles and techniques of audio and electronics engineering.  Not having this knowledge will most certainly limit your ability to experiment.

I second most of the books suggested here, I would also add: "Sound recording handbook" by Howard W. Sams; and "Audio Engineering Handbook" (the bible of audio engineering in my opinion).
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Daniel Asti

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Re: More theory, less technique
« Reply #6 on: May 18, 2006, 05:22:20 pm »

I'm not going to recommend a book but a concept and a documentary, "Tom Dowd & the Language of Music.". Take everything out except for the faders. No eq - no effects - no dynamics - no pan. So all you have is your gain stucture/room to work with.

I say this because getting a good mix has become so overcomplicated. When the first mixers came out and they were cutting mixes direct to vinyl (one take - no edits!) - Tom Dowd who was the first engineer to mic individual instuments - so with just the faders there were good engineers and not so good - then there were GREAT engineers.  Mastering your own ears - mic placement - room and faders is what makes a GREAT engineer in my opinion. I don't think you have to split every instument into 4 regions and compress them all while running it through three eqs and the latest $9000 mic.

It's such a shame that we get caught up with names and numbers, tubes and trasistors, monitors and modules that we forget to close our eyes and gently move the faders until we hear just the right blend.

There were a few engineers but there were only a couple really, really good ones.  It was a brand new skill/talent and Tom Dowd was one of the best at creating the loudest, clearest capture of a performance.  His mixes stood out so much which is what it's all about.

Anyway, he say at one point in the film, "but what does it sound like?", in reference to gear and theory.
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J.J. Blair

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Re: More theory, less technique
« Reply #7 on: May 18, 2006, 06:05:40 pm »

Wait for my DVD.   Rolling Eyes
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ratite

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Re: More theory, less technique
« Reply #8 on: May 18, 2006, 09:24:48 pm »

J.J. Blair wrote on Fri, 19 May 2006 07:05

Wait for my DVD.   Rolling Eyes

I am  Smile
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