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Author Topic: Record Noise  (Read 2100 times)

2db

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Record Noise
« on: March 28, 2006, 09:41:35 pm »

.

Please check out these songs. The first three were recorded some years ago.

I was wondering if there is a way to remove some of the record noise?


We no longer have the masters, and we are thinking of rereleasing a couple of these tunes.

Specifically on the tune:
  In Remembrance
http://www.myspace.com/2db

Specifically on:
  In A Galaxy Far Away
  Brain Tumor Blues
http://www.myspace.com/thirdstream

.

John Ivan

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Re: Record Noise
« Reply #1 on: March 28, 2006, 10:27:59 pm »

It can be cleaned to some degree. Waves makes some plugs that work on hum/clicks/ and so on. I've used it before and it worked pretty well. The few record cleanup's I did were kinda for fun and I'm hardly the leading authority on the subject but, I ended up getting rid of the noise and then gently reshaping the eq up top to bring some snap back into it.

Others will know more about this I'm sure but ,,yeah, it can be done.
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Adam Dempsey

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Re: Record Noise
« Reply #2 on: March 28, 2006, 11:42:55 pm »

Cedar manual declick would make light work of that. Longer/grouped clicks and glitches a specialty (although somewhat time consuming and max 50 samples long at 96k).

I'm in the midst of 57 x 16inch discs from '52-'57, some vinyl, some acetate (and some with the laqcuer lifting from shrinkage). I've not used Waves restoration tools, only Cedar & No Noise. Cedar declick and dethump have been just the thing for these.
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Ronny

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Re: Record Noise
« Reply #3 on: March 29, 2006, 01:35:18 am »

John Ivan wrote on Tue, 28 March 2006 22:27

It can be cleaned to some degree. Waves makes some plugs that work on hum/clicks/ and so on. I've used it before and it worked pretty well. The few record cleanup's I did were kinda for fun and I'm hardly the leading authority on the subject but, I ended up getting rid of the noise and then gently reshaping the eq up top to bring some snap back into it.

Others will know more about this I'm sure but ,,yeah, it can be done.



Waves makes some pretty good eq's, fair comp's and verbs, but their restoration plugs would be my last choice for these tunes.

I agree with Adam, these songs can be fully cleaned with little problem other than the time it takes. If you send them out, be sure to leave some dead air off of the vinyl. IOW, if you convert them to digital, don't erase the pre and post roll, so that the engineer can hear the condition of the vinyl sans the music.  
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Adam Dempsey

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Re: Record Noise
« Reply #4 on: March 29, 2006, 01:43:21 am »

True, leave surface noise pre & post the track for any analysis.

And don't digitise with peaks approaching 0dB full scale (not that there's need to with 24 bit A-D). It's important to leave several dB headroom (as much as 6dB or more depending on the record) for any click reconstruction.
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dcollins

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Re: Record Noise
« Reply #5 on: March 29, 2006, 01:57:59 am »

Adam Dempsey wrote on Tue, 28 March 2006 22:43

True, leave surface noise pre & post the track for any analysis.



Better to leave it in, of course, but only broad-band noise reduction needs a "sample."  And things like the DNS-1000 don't even require that.  Fancy stuff.

For impulse noise reduction, you don't need it.

Quote:


And don't digitise with peaks approaching 0dB full scale (not that there's need to with 24 bit A-D). It's important to leave several dB headroom (as much as 6dB or more depending on the record) for any click reconstruction.


True enough.  For all applications!

DC

Pingu

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Re: Record Noise
« Reply #6 on: March 29, 2006, 02:03:00 am »

Ronny wrote on Wed, 29 March 2006 14:35

John Ivan wrote on Tue, 28 March 2006 22:27

It can be cleaned to some degree. Waves makes some plugs that work on hum/clicks/ and so on. I've used it before and it worked pretty well. The few record cleanup's I did were kinda for fun and I'm hardly the leading authority on the subject but, I ended up getting rid of the noise and then gently reshaping the eq up top to bring some snap back into it.

Others will know more about this I'm sure but ,,yeah, it can be done.



Waves makes some pretty good eq's, fair comp's and verbs, but their restoration plugs would be my last choice for these tunes.

I agree with Adam, these songs can be fully cleaned with little problem other than the time it takes. If you send them out, be sure to leave some dead air off of the vinyl. IOW, if you convert them to digital, don't erase the pre and post roll, so that the engineer can hear the condition of the vinyl sans the music.  






Yep

Stay away from waves noise restoration.

Find someone with Cedar or algorithmix.
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Ronny

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Re: Record Noise
« Reply #7 on: March 29, 2006, 02:28:46 am »

dcollins wrote on Wed, 29 March 2006 01:57

Adam Dempsey wrote on Tue, 28 March 2006 22:43

True, leave surface noise pre & post the track for any analysis.



Better to leave it in, of course, but only broad-band noise reduction needs a "sample."  And things like the DNS-1000 don't even require that.  Fancy stuff.


DC




Completely opposite of why I recommend to leave it in, which is to isolate the pops and clicks away from the broadband for fingerprinting. Pops and clicks are not typically broadband, very little noise of this type is and I would not take a broadband approach to this material. Did you listen to it?
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dcollins

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Re: Record Noise
« Reply #8 on: March 29, 2006, 02:59:27 am »

Ronny wrote on Tue, 28 March 2006 23:28


Pops and clicks are not typically broadband, very little noise of this type is and I would not take a broadband approach to this material. Did you listen to it?


Pops and clicks have a fast rise-time which allows one to separate them from the music, with a more-or-less surgical approach. In the time domain.

Broad-band noise reduction is much harder, and is usually approached as a "frequency domain" FFT/IFT type problem. Picture a 1024 band graphic equalizer, with a threshold set by the noise "estimate," and if a band is below the limit, it gets attenuated, etc.

Taking LP clicks out is relatively easy.

I picture, somewhere, CMH, and JAM laughing the laugh of the truly carefree...

At me.

DC

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