R/E/P > Acoustics in Motion

A thread about wall construction

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ShakesTheClown:
Thomas, you are so kind to help me with this. Thank you.

I do not have plans of the building at all right now, I'm not sure I can even get them.

I do have direct neighbors. The studio office and offices for the record label/management company are next door. The wall is 1/2 drywall and insulation on wood framing. I can take out the inside (my side) layer of drywall if necessary but I can't build on their side. There is a hair salon on the other side of them.

I'm ok with a little transmission between the rooms. I built the place I'm in now(all the wrong ways) and It's just one smallish room with a 10x10x12 iso booth. I can always hear amps firing away in there so I guess I'm used to it. I really wish I had better isolation though. When checking drums I can always hear the fundamentals more in the room that through the speakers.

Vibrations from the street? How much should I tolerate? Will it be noticeable or is it just low frequency rumble?

Thomas@Northward:

--- Quote from: ShakesTheClown on April 14, 2011, 01:04:35 PM ---I do have direct neighbors. The studio office and offices for the record label/management company are next door. The wall is 1/2 drywall and insulation on wood framing. I can take out the inside (my side) layer of drywall if necessary but I can't build on their side. There is a hair salon on the other side of them.
--- End quote ---

Then I would float, no hesitation to have here. You cannot afford to have issues with your neighbors. They can have you closed down in a matter of days. Solidian transmission is the cause of a lot of  re-emission, and no matter how thick your walls will be, it's the building structure and THEIR wall that will vibrate and cause them to hear you. Even if they're far.


--- Quote from: ShakesTheClown on April 14, 2011, 01:04:35 PM ---Vibrations from the street? How much should I tolerate? Will it be noticeable or is it just low frequency rumble?

--- End quote ---

You should not tolerate any. Even if barely audible. Once you start to compress, it will be difficult to manage. But that can be assessed by doing some measurement over a few days.

To reassure you: both these issues are taken care of or improving when floating.

boggy:
I agree with Thomas.  Nick has at least two reasons to build a (serious) floating floor. Neighbors and street traffic.
Solid (concrete) slab on ground is a cheapest/easiest way to build a floating floor because there aren't load-bearing capacity problems.

rjc:

--- Quote from: Thomas@Northward on April 18, 2011, 05:40:29 AM ---Then I would float, no hesitation to have here. You cannot afford to have issues with your neighbors...

--- End quote ---

Yes, absolutely. It's not just about ensuring your neighbours won't complain and/or have you shut down. You also need to deal with impact noises, footfalls and dropped items etc finding their way from your neighbours' spaces into yours and onto your recordings. This is potentially at least as serious an issue as rumble and vibration from the street (the noises may be less frequent, but no less problematic...).

ShakesTheClown:

--- Quote from: Thomas@Northward on April 18, 2011, 05:40:29 AM ---You should not tolerate any. Even if barely audible. Once you start to compress, it will be difficult to manage. But that can be assessed by doing some measurement over a few days.

--- End quote ---

What kind of measurements are we talking about here?

Also, what mind of construction would you recommend here for the floors and ceilings?

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