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Author Topic: getting into analog recording  (Read 4129 times)

absolutkj

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getting into analog recording
« on: January 21, 2006, 03:19:16 pm »

I've never worked with 2" tape before but I have access to a 16track two inch machine, and I wanted to try my luck at it.  I've worked with 1/4" and 1/2" at a mastering studio but I've never tracked to 2".  Would it necessarily be a bad idea to order a few slightly used reels of 2" just so I could get my barings down, before spending $180 on a brand new reel?  We're not talking about sticky tape or anything with problems due to age, but I'm just wondering if there would be a major quality difference due to the tapes' biasing, etc...  Frequency response issues?  Thanks.
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scottoliphant

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Re: getting into analog recording
« Reply #1 on: January 21, 2006, 03:27:22 pm »

not a bad idea at all, in my opinion. Slightly used tape (from the past few years) would be fine. just bias the deck for the type of tape you are going to be running on the machine and make sure it's aligned properly.

Les Ismore

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Re: getting into analog recording
« Reply #2 on: January 21, 2006, 03:51:23 pm »

And get the all the same type of tape (so you don't need to re-bias between rolls).
Good used tape is fine. Make sure there's no splices.
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absolutkj

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Re: getting into analog recording
« Reply #3 on: January 22, 2006, 02:10:22 pm »

how much should I look to spend for a used reel?  Is $30 an outragious low blow offer?  Also, would it matter if I was using the tape on a 16 track and it was previously used on a 24 track?  
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scottoliphant

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Re: getting into analog recording
« Reply #4 on: January 22, 2006, 06:40:49 pm »

Quote:

$30 an outragious low blow offer
that is really low for 2" tape, but, you might find someone trying to liquidate old tape locally (like a craiglist) for that if you get lucky. Make sure you don't buy total crap for $30. really horrible tape could gum up your new deck.
Quote:

would it matter if I was using the tape on a 16 track and it was previously used on a 24 track
nope.

If you are worried about price, consider going in with a friend on a box of tape. Maybe check with that mastering studio you spoke of earlier, they may have a few reels lying around they'd be willing to part with

Ronny

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Re: getting into analog recording
« Reply #5 on: January 22, 2006, 06:50:18 pm »



Might not be a bad idea to bulk erase the 24 track tape before you use it for 16 track.  
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Teddy G.

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Re: getting into analog recording
« Reply #6 on: January 23, 2006, 04:19:10 pm »

As much as I applaud your idea of getting into analog tape recording, I have to admonish... Getting into analog tape recording, today, is like getting into any other "no longer supported" thing(Film cameras, carburator rebuilding.). There is, first-off, no tape, no film, no cars that use carburators... There are no parts, no local experts, no major companies building "new" things(And making most of their R&D budget selling most of it to consumers or "wanna' be's"!) - and it can cost alot of money! Analog recording is, today, at best, a "niche" market. If you are prepared to do alot of work to "fit in" to the niche, so be it. If you just want to record and you think 2" tape will be some sort of salvation, or even the slightest bit "better"(It may BE - though I have lots of doubt - if you can ever learn how to do it and find what you need to do it with?), your time and your money may be better spent updating Protools, or something?


TG  
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TotalSonic

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Re: getting into analog recording
« Reply #7 on: January 23, 2006, 08:12:22 pm »

Teddy G. wrote on Mon, 23 January 2006 21:19

As much as I applaud your idea of getting into analog tape recording, I have to admonish... Getting into analog tape recording, today, is like getting into any other "no longer supported" thing(Film cameras, carburator rebuilding.). There is, first-off, no tape,


ummm.... wrong.  Lots of NOS still available and Quantegy is back producing & ATR is a few months away from production.

Quote:

 no local experts,


Probably no local experts in small towns in PA - but there are a number of them in recording centers like NYC, LA, Nashville


Quote:

no major companies building "new" things


But certainly no absence of machines available and well run boutique places like ATR doing rebuilds, restoration and doing custom work.

Best regards,
Steve Berson

absolutkj

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Re: getting into analog recording
« Reply #8 on: January 24, 2006, 01:19:37 am »

Teddy G. wrote on Mon, 23 January 2006 16:19

 If you just want to record and you think 2" tape will be some sort of salvation, or even the slightest bit "better"(It may BE - though I have lots of doubt - if you can ever learn how to do it and find what you need to do it with?), your time and your money may be better spent updating Protools, or something?


TG  


It's an interesting view, and thank you for your warning.  But maybe I forgot to mention that I am a student, I do live in NYC where a few people I know still use tape when available, and also I want to be (In Steve's words) operating on a "conversational level" with whatever equipment I may encounter in the studio.  There will always be musicians or engineers who want to experiment with recording formats, not necessarily just for sound quality, but for the way it feels in a particular session.  I've read a lot of arguments in favor of tape, where people say, protools isn't nearly as tactile as analog recording- you have to use your own hands to edit tape, rather than non-destructively trimming regions to the heart's desire.  

And don't get me wrong, my background is in digital recording, and I'm not necessarily disappointed with the ease of protools, not to mention the cost effectiveness.  But my motives for learning some tape techniques can best be described by the cheesy analogy, It doesn't hurt to work on mental math even when you have a calculator to do it all for you.  

No intentions of offending anyone on this forum with my opinions or personal reasons for learning something new to me.
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bobkatz

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Re: getting into analog recording
« Reply #9 on: January 24, 2006, 08:54:55 am »

Ronny wrote on Sun, 22 January 2006 18:50



Might not be a bad idea to bulk erase the 24 track tape before you use it for 16 track.  



It's a requirement! I believe that some of those tracks may not erase properly with the 16 track erase head. If it's "just for play" and you don't mind accidentily hearing some previous material, ok, but you know, it's never "just for play". Once you start putting music onto that tape with the record button, you never know what might turn out.

BK
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scottoliphant

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Re: getting into analog recording
« Reply #10 on: January 24, 2006, 09:13:40 am »

don't let anyone dissuade you from trying it out. I went from digital to tape, a few years ago, and am still excited everytime I crack open a new box. I'm 28 and many people my age (that i know) are either rediscovering it, or using it as their primary medium. Many more still use it in conjunction with the digi rig. Ask whoever you buy it from if they'll erase it for you. Just sold a bunch of almost new gp9 and i erased for the guy.

mikemcdonald

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Re: getting into analog recording
« Reply #11 on: January 27, 2006, 10:42:46 am »

TotalSonic wrote on Mon, 23 January 2006 20:12



Quote:

 no local experts,


Probably no local experts in small towns in PA - but there are a number of them in recording centers like NYC, LA, Nashville




2006 ATR Services, Inc.
2101 Pennsylvania Ave ~ Suite 11
York, PA 17404
(717) 852-7700

i dunno - york's pretty small. Surprised  j/k.

substitute 'OH' for 'PA'  - right on the money.

speaking of - check out their alignment seminars, absolutkj. worth it and it's a good way to get submersed in it and have questions answered...

later...

Mike

Brett Mixter Rader

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Re: getting into analog recording
« Reply #12 on: January 31, 2006, 12:39:47 pm »

Ronny wrote on Sun, 22 January 2006 23:50



Might not be a bad idea to bulk erase the 24 track tape before you use it for 16 track.  


I had exactly the same thought

Brett Mixter Rader

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Re: getting into analog recording
« Reply #13 on: January 31, 2006, 12:41:51 pm »

scottoliphant wrote on Tue, 24 January 2006 14:13

don't let anyone dissuade you from trying it out. I went from digital to tape, a few years ago, and am still excited everytime I crack open a new box. I'm 28 and many people my age (that i know) are either rediscovering it, or using it as their primary medium. Many more still use it in conjunction with the digi rig. Ask whoever you buy it from if they'll erase it for you. Just sold a bunch of almost new gp9 and i erased for the guy.


Theres nothing the smell when you crack open a fresh roll of tape. Espically GP9
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