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Author Topic: Do any commercial releases never see tape??  (Read 7621 times)

bblackwood

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Re: Do any commercial releases never see tape??
« Reply #15 on: March 22, 2011, 05:16:55 pm »

I'd say very few major label projects see tape anymore.
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Brad Blackwood
euphonic masters

Joao Bessa

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Re: Do any commercial releases never see tape??
« Reply #16 on: March 24, 2011, 09:49:55 pm »

Have you guys heard about endless analog Clasp? It seems tape its getting back again!! Not archive wise but at least for the sound.

http://www.endlessanalog.com/
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saint

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Re: Do any commercial releases never see tape??
« Reply #17 on: April 21, 2011, 08:20:11 pm »

I would recommend that you mix to your 1", 1/2" or 1/4" tape and, in REAL TIME, send the signal off the playback head (BEFORE it wraps) to a HIGH resolution 2 track digital recorder (with the BEST CLOCK you can afford, and the best a/d & d/a you can afford) at no less than 24/176.4. Master from the TAPE and once you have your final e.q.,compression, etc. down then make another (at least 24/17.6,4) digital copy of that as well. Another analog back up of the final mastering to the same (or better) analog format and your usual two or three more digital back ups of that.
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grievousangel

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Re: Do any commercial releases never see tape??
« Reply #18 on: May 02, 2011, 03:46:00 pm »

I would imagine that unless it is specifically requested, the tape machine is not rowed out of the corner or you booked the wrong room for tape. Having said that, I still advance the notion that if tape is done right, tape has an 'bonding' & 'sweetening' effect on the recording that is hard to walk past if you are listening. As most of us can, I can identify a good analog tape recording, with everything else being equal, fairly easy and make very positive comments on said recording. I am 60 years of age so I am from the old analog/tape world but I do agree that digital offers features that are unmatched when comparing to other formats.

BTW: I am not real sure, if humans will actually enjoy 'pure' natural sounding recordings (what ever that is) as they might sound boring. There are many. many sound-changing influences on the actual sound source. Sound capturing & reproducing devices are 'trendy' as well. Again, listen to your ears and your taste, and hope, others have similar ears and taste. Isn't that what makes artists, engineers and producers a brand name? It's not necessarily right or wrong or better or best, but a joining of similar taste within a given trend and current state of the technology. Having rambled on, I do agree that sound quality matters. And, oh yea, what about the song. A great song works regardless of the technology.

Anyways . . . I miss tape or should I say, I miss the sound of tape, as tape can be a pain in the a..! But, I do wish I had a new 1/2" stereo tape machine.

Take care,

William
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myles83

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Re: Do any commercial releases never see tape??
« Reply #19 on: May 04, 2011, 08:49:35 pm »

I think "commercial recordings" is a bit hard to pin down, but I think I know what we're talking about...

I've got my hands on 2" GP9 4+ days a week on average.  All rhythm section tracking (drums, bass, basics) goes down on our A800.  So much that I'm restoring a 2nd a800 to be a dedicated 2" 16 track.  Tape is not dead, but I understand the reluctant attitude by many to keep machines calibrated and running properly as well as the clients wishing to forego the expense of tape.  Offering rental reels and discussing the benifits with clients beforehand helps swing em.'  Also, the option to dump to PT at the end of the day eases their worries about "not being able to edit" (razor ;)) I can say definitively that I prefer the workflow, commitment to parts/takes, and sound of tracking analog over the 9 billion vocal takes and gtr parts I wind up with in digital for ods.

Unfortunately, I end up mixing down to digital on most sessions because so many (affordable) mastering facilities are not offering 1/2" or even 1/4" decks anymore.  Its a drag but I'm not the one paying for the record. 
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