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Author Topic: From Recording to Hit?  (Read 3257 times)

Offline Bob Olhsson

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Re: From Recording to Hit?
« Reply #15 on: October 11, 2005, 01:42:05 pm »
Production is what makes an easy to learn, easy to sing song not become annoying or boring upon repetition. Underproduction can be just as big of a problem as overproduction in my experience.

I'll never forget working on a disco album where the high-profile producer "humored" a singing group by allowing them to put a ballad one member had written on the album. I had to beg that enough time be spent to get the complex background stacks in tune on this song.

Turned out somebody in radio fell in love with this "throw-away" and it became a top-10 hit while the highly promoted title track never made it past being theme music for a shortly-lived TV dance show.

Offline bjornson

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Re: From Recording to Hit?
« Reply #16 on: October 11, 2005, 02:55:33 pm »
I second the value of "the tipping point".
Learn to be a "connector"!!!!!

Offline maxdimario

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Re: From Recording to Hit?
« Reply #17 on: October 11, 2005, 07:04:40 pm »
Quote:

Production is what makes an easy to learn, easy to sing song not become annoying or boring upon repetition. Underproduction can be just as big of a problem as overproduction in my experience.


The 'trick' of many hit records, is that the actual skeleton of the record, being the song, the initial tracking and concept, as well as the singing delivery is VERY simple and straightforward.

this way the average person can immediately relate to the track.

then, the producer's experience in making the track listenable over and over is added on in a subtle but supportive way and grows on you as you listen over and over.

from banal and simple it becomes a complete artistic statement, which goes beyond street-level to incorporate evolved musical ideals etc. which translate into lasting appeal.

I remember re-listening to the sex pistols' NMTB a year ago and thinking that even though the musicians had nothing to do with traditional hit-making, the engineers and producers sure did.

there is a lot of textural work on that album that the later Punk albums did not reproduce (or probably notice).

Offline 12345

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Re: From Recording to Hit?
« Reply #18 on: October 13, 2005, 08:25:00 pm »
Thanks to all!

I just purchased "Tipping Point" from Amazon, along with a book I've been wanting to buy for a long time called, "Crossing the Chasm" which deals with making the transition from an "early adopter" marketplace to a "mass consumer" marketplace.  Both should be good reads.  

I like the ideas about music being able to serve as a voice to break down barriers...so perhaps that is the key.  Sometimes the answer can be so simple...

The point about the "sleeper" hit where production played a role in making a top-10 hit from an album where the expected "hit" did not chart was much appreciated, because part of my question is...how much confidence can I really have in a single song...and am I safer to push for additional songs to accompany it...so that helps address that question...

I also like the point about the artist acting as a delivery method for an otherwise good composition, and the production putting the finishing touches on it.  All of these are good points.  THANKS!!!

Sincerely,
MW