R/E/P Community

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

Pages: 1 2 3 [All]   Go Down

Author Topic: The Famous Fifteen Minute Deaf Mix Story  (Read 23581 times)

compasspnt

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 16266
The Famous Fifteen Minute Deaf Mix Story
« on: March 13, 2005, 12:55:29 am »

About five years ago, I was mixing an album here at Compass Point for Capitol Records.  I was in our Studio B, on an SSL 4048.  The group's material was totally unknown to me, and I would only hear each song for the first time just as we started to mix each one.

The producer (and engineer) of the material was an acquaintance whom I had known for some time; he was also an excellent studio musician, and an actual member of this group.  Because he was an engineer and producer as well as I, with his own 24 track studio, we would often discuss various aspects of tracking, mixing and production; one day while we were talking about mixing, I made certain comments about the way I approached a mix, which my friend found to be slightly off base relative to the way he approached that task.  One thing led to another, and before long, for whatever reason, I had made several statements which he believed to be exaggerations.  So I went even a bit further, and stated to him that I was so well practiced in mixing, having done so many for so long, that I didn't even need to hear the song to get a decent mix.  When he snorted that this was ridiculous, how could this be possible, I said I could tell what to do by just looking at the meters, and that I could do it in a mere fifteen minutes!  (Of course I was exaggerating by this time, to try to push him a bit over the edge.)  But he took it to heart, and was outraged at the thought that I, or anyone, could properly mix without hearing what one was doing.

Well, having gone this far into the absurd conversation, I couldn't back down.  He insisted that I take back what I had said, or prove it; he made a bet with me that it was impossible.

So I had no choice but to follow through.  I told him to pick any song he wanted to, of the ones still left to mix.  He knew full well that I had not heard these songs in any form before.  We disconnected all monitor speakers and had them removed from the room.  All track charts were likewise taken away.

I promised that I would perform a decent mix, with levels and panning properly placed, and equalisation, compression, and reverb alloted where needed to the correct instruments or vocals in a reasonable manner; I was to record this mix to a Dat tape for playback.  I did insist that he leave the room so as not to distract me; TOTAL CONCENTRATION was going to be required!  So our technician and assistant engineer, Osie Bowe, was stationed in the room to police the situation, to make sure that I did not cheat in any way (such as by using headphones).  Since everyone trusts Osie, this was totally acceptable to him.  Of course, by now word had spread, and the whole band was anxiously awaiting the outcome.

The clock was started, and off I went.  (It was only later that I found out that he had purposely chosen a song which he felt was different than any other on the album, and on which the tracking [what sound was on what track] was different than any I had previously mixed for them.  Using the meters only, I deduced what instruments or vocals were what, and placed levels and panning according to what I thought they might be.  I added reverb to certain things, as well as a bit of EQ and compression.  I did level changes based on what the meters told me, and what section of the song I thought we were in.  I was ready to "go to tape" in just under 12 minutes, which was a good thing, as the song was just over 3 minutes long.  The final chord went to tape exactly at the fifteen minute mark, as I carefully lowered the master fader for a smooth ending (I hoped!)  Oh, I also had made a total recall save.

Everyone filed in to hear the results.  The Genelec monitors were returned, and the tape replay chosen on the monitor matrix. Then for the first time, I heard the actual song I had just mixed!  Fortunately, so did everyone else.  Because after one listen, we made about two tiny changes, and printed it to 1/2' so we could go on to the next song.

I still have that Dat.
Logged

Brian Kehew

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2914
Re: The Famous Fifteen Minute Deaf Mix Story
« Reply #1 on: March 13, 2005, 05:42:10 am »

Amazing!!

BUT it makes sense, in a way. You have been "experienced" at this for so long, that some things DO make sense. I heard a song start once (1st I had heard it) and then predicted "The guitar solo will come in at 1:18" and was within two seconds. The band were astounded but - because it's almost always right after the second chorus, and the song seemed normal, at a typical tempo. Something I have done many times before!

I, you, we - probably all have functionally good settings on things for vocal, bass, drum panning, etc. I suppose if we HAD to try everything from the ground up each time, we'd get very little done. We ARE creatures of habit, but for a reason...

There are stories of a famous British engineer who could set up the faders and mics PERFECTLY before each session - he wa so used to his own setup that it could be predicted how things should be done. But it seems amazing!

So - We'd like to hear that track, of course. And I like people that do crazy things on bets in studios.... (topic???)
Logged
Relax and float downstream...

Andy Simpson

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 714
Re: The Famous Fifteen Minute Deaf Mix Story
« Reply #2 on: March 13, 2005, 09:32:01 am »

That is a delightful account sir! I love it when a ridiculously extravagent bluff is proved out against all odds....

Of course we all know that if a song has been well tracked, it should amount to little more than bringing the faders up.....Wink

And isn't it ironic that so many FOH engineers have the complete opposite ability.....at 115 dB they can't mix it for shit....and ALL the meters are screaming R E D.....

Wink

Andy
Logged

J.J. Blair

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 12809
Re: The Famous Fifteen Minute Deaf Mix Story
« Reply #3 on: March 13, 2005, 12:52:22 pm »

If you e-mail an mp3, I'd be glad to host it in my public folder.
Logged
studio info

They say the heart of Rock & Roll is still beating, which is amazing if you consider all the blow it's done over the years.

"The Internet enables pompous blowhards to interact with other pompous blowhards in a big circle jerk of pomposity." - Bill Maher

"The negative aspects of this business, not only will continue to prevail, but will continue to accelerate in madness. Conditions aren't going to get better, because the economics of rock and roll are getting closer and closer to the economics of Big Business America." - Bill Graham

zmix

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2828
Re: The Famous Fifteen Minute Deaf Mix Story
« Reply #4 on: March 13, 2005, 01:40:18 pm »

Beethoven composed the entire ninth symphony after becoming stone deaf...

djui5

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1511
Re: The Famous Fifteen Minute Deaf Mix Story
« Reply #5 on: March 13, 2005, 04:06:53 pm »

zmix wrote on Sun, 13 March 2005 11:40

Beethoven composed the entire ninth symphony after becoming stone deaf...



Further proof that we really do feel the music.


Great story Terry! That's awesome.
Logged
Morale of the day? Stop looking at what you're hearing.
yngve hoeyland 07'

Randy Wright
Mix Engineer
Mesa, Arizona

David Kulka

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 578
Re: The Famous Fifteen Minute Deaf Mix Story
« Reply #6 on: March 13, 2005, 04:17:22 pm »

Not long ago I met a well known engineer who sometimes does 5.1 mixes without using any surround speakers.  Despite being assured that they turn out just fine I was rather skeptical, but after reading Terry's story I guess I'm ready to believe it!
Logged
http://www.studioelectronics.biz

Service & Restoration of UREI dbx Neve Eventide Marshall AMS Tube Gear and more

compasspnt

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 16266
Re: The Famous Fifteen Minute Deaf Mix Story
« Reply #7 on: March 13, 2005, 10:18:16 pm »

OK, here's the Deaf Mix, as an mp3.

It turns out the Famous Fifteen Minute Deaf Mix was done in October of '97.  I remember more about it now, after hearing it again.  I tried to make decisions which wouldn't cloud things, such as making sure that what appeared to be the lead vocal was plenty loud, making sure that what appeared to be the bass wasn't too loud, so as to cover anything up, making sure that anything which appeared to have a lot of sustain wasn't too loud, and not getting too much reverb on anything.  All of these things were what we indeed tweaked from this "deaf" pass for the final, so it actually could have been even closer.

When listening, bear in mind that I could hear absolutely nothing as I mixed, and that this mp3 (ugh) came from a Dat machine (ugh!).  The real final was sent to 1/2".

http://www.compasspointstudios.com/Famous_15_Min_Deaf_Mix.mp 3
Logged

drumsound

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 638
Re: The Famous Fifteen Minute Deaf Mix Story
« Reply #8 on: March 13, 2005, 11:48:31 pm »

WOW!  Can I send you the reels of my band's new record and have you mix it without monitors?  I'll even give you track sheets.  I'm not sure whether to be inspired or to quit.
Logged

djui5

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1511
Re: The Famous Fifteen Minute Deaf Mix Story
« Reply #9 on: March 14, 2005, 12:04:40 am »

That's pretty good for a blind mix Terry!
Logged
Morale of the day? Stop looking at what you're hearing.
yngve hoeyland 07'

Randy Wright
Mix Engineer
Mesa, Arizona

jwhynot

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1749
Re: The Famous Fifteen Minute Deaf Mix Story
« Reply #10 on: March 14, 2005, 12:25:09 am »

zmix wrote on Sun, 13 March 2005 10:40

Beethoven composed the entire ninth symphony after becoming stone deaf...
NOt only that - he is reputed to have conducted the premiere performance.  Apparently the orchestra finished a little before Ludwig did - which had a profoundly moving effect on the audience (as did the music itself which was full of unprecedented ideas and orchestrations) as they realized he couldn't hear what was going on...

In other words, even with Mr. Manning's sleight-of-mix, we have to admit we're all chumps.

JW
Logged
one of both the most and least successful producers of ALL TIME!

jwhynot

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1749
Re: The Famous Fifteen Minute Deaf Mix Story
« Reply #11 on: March 14, 2005, 12:34:42 am »

Oh, and that is a very nice mix Mr Manning.

I did something a little like that once but without meaning to...

I had a mix up on the desk I'd been working on for a while - wanted a cassette (I think - was in '91 so that's what walked out to the car - and people think things are getting worse!) but not as urgently as I wanted a piss so I let the assistant run off the mix while I took care of business.

Came back, got the cassette and went for a drive.

The tune sounded pretty nice - in fact I was well pleased.  But after it was finished I heard the intro to the next tune on the 2" machine.  Problem is, there were 2 2" machines, and the way the reels were balanced only a handful of the tracks from this next tune played.  But the vocal, bass, main guitar and a few special details were there.

It sounded quite different from what I had intended - in fact the loudest voice was a harmony part in the chorus and the melody was a bit sublimated.

But I had to admit the "random" mix was more interesting - shed a whole new light on the song.

Now, I should mention that I was working on 4 songs for a group, that I had tracked the two days before, so the tracks were very much consistent between tunes.  But of course, not perfect.

It was an interesting juxtaposition between things I knew should be about right (sounds and ambiences on similar tracks) and completely random elements, like only the little overdub cocktail drum being there and not the kit or programmed parts.

Same deal - about an hour of convincing, followed by 10 minutes or so of spackling the balances, and we had our record.

So instead of conjuring the balance, one just dropped straight from heaven.

JW
Logged
one of both the most and least successful producers of ALL TIME!

Level

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1811
Re: The Famous Fifteen Minute Deaf Mix Story
« Reply #12 on: March 14, 2005, 10:11:50 am »

I had a guy I was working over the internet about a year ago that could not mix batter. I finally told him this:

Zero everything. Watch the record meters on the 2 mix recorder. Turn the kick to -3 ,then -5 on the bass line. Guitars at -7 (at or about) and the rest of the kit soloed at -8 except snare at -4.

It worked, he was able to fill in the gaps.

A basic cutsheet to get the foundation solid.

As always Terry, your postings and sharing is sage. I applaud you for taking the challenge. "kick ass dude!!"

Logged
http://balancedmastering.com

"Listen and Learn"
---Since 1975---

Gordon Rice

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 32
Re: The Famous Fifteen Minute Deaf Mix Story
« Reply #13 on: March 14, 2005, 10:35:27 am »

Wow.

It is remarkable how much we've learned to deduce about what's what and where just from looking at meters, isn't it?

That's nice work, Terry.

--gmr
Logged
Audio Engineer
Philadelphia PA
(Yeah, there've been some changes . . .)

Where are we going and what am I doing in this handbasket?

rolyboy

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 24
Re: The Famous Fifteen Minute Deaf Mix Story
« Reply #14 on: March 14, 2005, 10:55:23 am »

Terry,

That's a really impressive piece of work and a great example of experience, experience, experience and a lot of BALLS!!

I bet you could even drive a car blindfolded ??!! Razz
Logged

Otitis Media

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 564
Re: The Famous Fifteen Minute Deaf Mix Story
« Reply #15 on: March 14, 2005, 11:21:31 am »

After hearing that mix, it's official, I suck.  Damn.  Beautiful sounding gtrs.  
Logged
Dan Roth
Hired Gun

Level

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1811
Re: The Famous Fifteen Minute Deaf Mix Story
« Reply #16 on: March 14, 2005, 11:38:33 am »

Quote:

I bet you could even drive a car blindfolded ??!!  



(I heard Ray Charles use to drive his cars around at times in a big lot)
Logged
http://balancedmastering.com

"Listen and Learn"
---Since 1975---

Greg Dixon

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 791
Re: The Famous Fifteen Minute Deaf Mix Story
« Reply #17 on: March 14, 2005, 07:47:54 pm »

rolyboy wrote on Tue, 15 March 2005 02:55



I bet you could even drive a car blindfolded ??!! Razz


No, he needs to see the meters,but I assume he can fly on instruments, in zero visability. Cool
Logged

ericswan

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 214
Re: The Famous Fifteen Minute Deaf Mix Story
« Reply #18 on: March 14, 2005, 09:30:24 pm »

jwhynot wrote:
Quote:

The tune sounded pretty nice - in fact I was well pleased. But after it was finished I heard the intro to the next tune on the 2" machine. Problem is, there were 2 2" machines, and the way the reels were balanced only a handful of the tracks from this next tune played. But the vocal, bass, main guitar and a few special details were there.

It sounded quite different from what I had intended - in fact the loudest voice was a harmony part in the chorus and the melody was a bit sublimated.

But I had to admit the "random" mix was more interesting - shed a whole new light on the song.


I've heard that Bob Clearmountain has done that on purpose when mixing; leave a mix up, levels, fx etc and then play the next song on the reel just to see how it comes up.

I've tried it myself and some of the most interesting mix ideas have come out of that.
Logged
"Be yourself. Everyone else is taken." Oscar Wilde


Sacred Heart Studio
www.sacredheartstudio.net
www.myspace.com/sacredheartstudio

jwhynot

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1749
Re: The Famous Fifteen Minute Deaf Mix Story
« Reply #19 on: March 14, 2005, 11:26:26 pm »

We're starting to move away from "Jeez Terry that was some pretty clever mixing" to lateral thinking, oblique-strategies kind of stuff.

I also heard a story that when Clearmountain was mixing the Boss Bruce would banish Bob from the CR for a minute near the end of the mix and just give the faders a shove here and there.

I'm afraid that wouldn't be that effective with me - when the SSL J9000 first came online it had a habit of occasionally slapping all the faders to the bottom when the computer was turned on...  I was mixing 100+ tracks of score at the time so I got in the habit of memorizing the mix - so I could pretty much put it back no matter what.

Comes in handy when you've got collaborators... who don't understand that turning one thing up doesn't always make it better in the mix...

It's a good trick - try giving yourself like 10 minutes to get a balance up - listen carefully with hands off - then bury all the faders and try to put the same balance up in one go.

It's crazy at first but quite quickly you get the knack - it's like getting good at scales - it's not really mixing but a good bit of chops to have in the back pocket when needed.

JW
Logged
one of both the most and least successful producers of ALL TIME!

electrical

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 674
Re: The Famous Fifteen Minute Deaf Mix Story
« Reply #20 on: March 15, 2005, 02:25:30 am »

I used to have a cat named Fluss. Great cat. Top ten of all cats, probably. He liked to lay across my shoulders (anyone's shoulders, actually) with his legs dangling on either side of my neck.

I would occasionally sit at the desk with him like this. Once, he got startled and jumped off, nudging a couple of faders. Presto, the song sounded better.

He only did it once, though. I had to work it out on my own after that.
Logged
best,

steve albini
Electrical Audio
sa at electrical dot com
www.electrical.com

Norwood

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 223
Re: The Famous Fifteen Minute Deaf Mix Story
« Reply #21 on: March 15, 2005, 02:41:17 am »

electrical wrote on Mon, 14 March 2005 23:25

I used to have a cat named Fluss. Great cat. Top ten of all cats, probably. He liked to lay across my shoulders (anyone's shoulders, actually) with his legs dangling on either side of my neck.

I would occasionally sit at the desk with him like this. Once, he got startled and jumped off, nudging a couple of faders. Presto, the song sounded better.

He only did it once, though. I had to work it out on my own after that.


Nothing that cool happened to me, but one time my dog ate a pair of headphones.   Mad
Logged
Michael Norwood
Wood Bros. Productions

compasspnt

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 16266
Re: The Famous Fifteen Minute Deaf Mix Story
« Reply #22 on: March 15, 2005, 07:12:33 am »

electrical wrote on Tue, 15 March 2005 02:25

I used to have a cat named Fluss. Great cat. Top ten of all cats, probably. He liked to lay across my shoulders (anyone's shoulders, actually) with his legs dangling on either side of my neck.

I would occasionally sit at the desk with him like this. Once, he got startled and jumped off, nudging a couple of faders. Presto, the song sounded better.

He only did it once, though. I had to work it out on my own after that.


Hey Steve, can I borrow him for the day?
Logged

compasspnt

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 16266
Re: The Famous Fifteen Minute Deaf Mix Story
« Reply #23 on: March 15, 2005, 09:53:57 pm »

drumsound wrote on Sun, 13 March 2005 23:48

WOW!  Can I send you the reels of my band's new record and have you mix it without monitors?  I'll even give you track sheets.  I'm not sure whether to be inspired or to quit.


Sure, bring it on!  I have a special going on this week; if you do want me to use monitor speakers, I'm giving two for the price of one...so you get STEREO for a MONO mix price!!!

But track sheets alone will do...


Seriously, remember it's what you have to mix that first defines what you'll get.  If the sounds on the deaf mix multi hadn't been good to start with...
Logged

brandondrury

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 703
Re: The Famous Fifteen Minute Deaf Mix Story
« Reply #24 on: March 16, 2005, 10:36:03 pm »

Quote:

Amazing!!

BUT it makes sense, in a way. You have been "experienced" at this for so long, that some things DO make sense.


Bull crap!  This is just proof that a monkey can predict the stock market better than a professional stock broker.  

My computer speakers are fried, so I haven't heard the mix yet.  I think this just puts the music mixing career thing into perspective.

Brandon

iluvatar

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 84
Re: The Famous Fifteen Minute Deaf Mix Story
« Reply #25 on: March 16, 2005, 11:50:25 pm »

Being the house soundguy in a nightclub is a good way to learn to set up a mix quickly. Not much time for soundcheck when the early show ends 15 minutes before yours is supposed to start. (Is it still considered late if it happens evey time?)

-Dan.
Logged
Dan Costello
Minister of Public Enlightenment
Mercenary Audio

"Well, I've been to one world fair, a picnic, and a rodeo, and that's the stupidest thing I ever heard come over a set of earphones.."

jwhynot

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1749
Re: The Famous Fifteen Minute Deaf Mix Story
« Reply #26 on: March 17, 2005, 12:31:38 am »

iluvatar wrote on Wed, 16 March 2005 20:50

Being the house soundguy in a nightclub is a good way to learn to set up a mix quickly. Not much time for soundcheck when the early show ends 15 minutes before yours is supposed to start. (Is it still considered late if it happens evey time?)

-Dan.
You got that right - try full-orchestra film scores sometime!

75 piece orchestra, plus jazz band, plus rhythm section, a duduk soloist and a 12-piece choir.

And you want to be ready by 10:10 if you can... 10:05 is even better.

You just have to have some experience and know what the hell you're doing - Brandon!

JW
Logged
one of both the most and least successful producers of ALL TIME!

Brian Kehew

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2914
Re: The Famous Fifteen Minute Deaf Mix Story
« Reply #27 on: March 17, 2005, 06:37:16 am »

>>> Bull crap! This is just proof that a monkey can predict the stock market better than a professional stock broker.
My computer speakers are fried, so I haven't heard the mix yet. I think this just puts the music mixing career thing into perspective>>

Hmmm...is it, does it? Interesting.
Logged
Relax and float downstream...

compasspnt

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 16266
Re: The Famous Fifteen Minute Deaf Mix Story
« Reply #28 on: March 17, 2005, 02:47:54 pm »

brandondrury wrote on Wed, 16 March 2005 22:36

...Bull crap!  This is just proof that a monkey can predict the stock market better than a professional stock broker.  

My computer speakers are fried, so I haven't heard the mix yet.  I think this just puts the music mixing career thing into perspective.



Thank you for your thoughts Brandon!

But don't you know you don't even need your speakers to listen to this mp3?
Logged

compasspnt

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 16266
Re: The Famous Fifteen Minute Deaf Mix Story
« Reply #29 on: March 17, 2005, 02:51:06 pm »

Greg Dixon wrote on Mon, 14 March 2005 19:47

rolyboy wrote on Tue, 15 March 2005 02:55



I bet you could even drive a car blindfolded ??!!  


No, he needs to see the meters, but I assume he can fly on instruments, in zero visability.



Indeed.  And if this were not a music forum, I would tell the horrible story of my worst day as an instrument pilot.  I'll look for a flying forum for that...
Logged

McAllister

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1145
Re: The Famous Fifteen Minute Deaf Mix Story
« Reply #30 on: March 17, 2005, 03:02:17 pm »

Wow. I am always floored by people who have strong opinions of movies they've never seen, food they've never tried, or (in this case) music they've never heard.

I do not care about uninformed opinions.

Thankfully, they're pretty rare in this forum.

Thanks again, Terry. For everything.

M
Logged
Only put off until tomorrow what you are willing to die having left undone.

Greg Dixon

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 791
Re: The Famous Fifteen Minute Deaf Mix Story
« Reply #31 on: March 18, 2005, 02:48:35 am »

compasspnt wrote on Fri, 18 March 2005 06:51

Greg Dixon wrote on Mon, 14 March 2005 19:47

rolyboy wrote on Tue, 15 March 2005 02:55



I bet you could even drive a car blindfolded ??!!  


No, he needs to see the meters, but I assume he can fly on instruments, in zero visability.



Indeed.  And if this were not a music forum, I would tell the horrible story of my worst day as an instrument pilot.  I'll look for a flying forum for that...



Hey Terry,
You did get one flying story in. Smile
Logged

compasspnt

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 16266
Re: The Famous Fifteen Minute Deaf Mix Story
« Reply #32 on: April 02, 2005, 08:04:42 pm »

jwhynot wrote on Mon, 14 March 2005 23:26

...
I also heard a story that when Clearmountain was mixing the Boss Bruce would banish Bob from the CR for a minute near the end of the mix and just give the faders a shove here and there...


And I'll bet that Bob put them all right back when he returned!
Logged

New Orleans Steve

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 216
Re: The Famous Fifteen Minute Deaf Mix Story
« Reply #33 on: April 03, 2005, 10:36:08 am »

So Terry,
  What IS your rate for a 1/4 hour?
   As if things in out industry were not bad enough!

Steve
Logged
Straightwire Studios New Orleans is now Straightwire Studios Tampa
Is now back in New Orleans!


Check us out on line www.frenchmenstreetrecords.com

Bill Mueller

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 4502
Re: The Famous Fifteen Minute Deaf Mix Story
« Reply #34 on: April 04, 2005, 09:52:50 pm »

This is not on the order of Terry's mix, (Terry, can you tell us what that sweet keyboard is?) but I have been doing concert broadcast mixing for years and when you have 10 minutes between multiple acts that you have never heard before, life gets interesting. Many live gigs involve ten hours and eleven acts and a live mix going out to a satelite dish.

So after years of practice, and on an SSL, I can look at the input tape, set my preamps, short faders (always 0VU), assignments, large faders, basic eq and three or four reverbs, choruses and the like and then within eight bars of the top of first song have a decent mix. I have seen other mixers come in and mess with the drums for the first song and the guitars for the second and sort of get the mix on the third.

I have always tried to teach my students to get their mix quickly and not spend too much time listening to individual tracks. You can spend hours getting the drums sounding just so and then bring in the instruments and the drums sound terrible.

Very nice Mr Manning.

Best Regards,

Bill
Logged
"Don't take it personally. But this shit is a science." J.J.Blair

“The Internet is only a means of communication,” he wrote. “It is not an amorphous extraterrestrial body with an entitlement to norms that run counter to the fundamental principles of human rights. There is nothing in the criminal or civil law which legalizes that which is otherwise illegal simply because the transaction takes place over the Internet.” Irish judge, Peter Charleton

Bill Mueller

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 4502
Re: The Famous Fifteen Minute Deaf Mix Story
« Reply #35 on: April 04, 2005, 10:12:11 pm »

Brandon,

You have 223 messages on these forums so you are not a novice. However, this appears to be your first message on Terry's forum. I would point out to you that this forum has been characterized by a level of respect and decorum that is exceptional by internet standards. This is because Terry is above all a gentleman and by example has set a high standard for behavior. Even his response to your short outburst was gentlemanly.

I would also request that you read many of the postings here. You will not only find a garden of usable advice, but you may also acquire a feel for the way nearly all of the respondents here converse in a truly friendly and supportive way.

Best Regards,

Bill
Logged
"Don't take it personally. But this shit is a science." J.J.Blair

“The Internet is only a means of communication,” he wrote. “It is not an amorphous extraterrestrial body with an entitlement to norms that run counter to the fundamental principles of human rights. There is nothing in the criminal or civil law which legalizes that which is otherwise illegal simply because the transaction takes place over the Internet.” Irish judge, Peter Charleton
Pages: 1 2 3 [All]   Go Up