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Author Topic: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out  (Read 40708 times)

ericswan

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Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
« Reply #30 on: March 10, 2005, 11:30:50 am »

Whykooper wrote:

Quote:

I'm still trying to figure out who/where/how the 1966 hit "Talk Talk" by the Music Machine was recorded. For it's time in 1966, those drums are really really well mic'd and recorded. The only name I find associated with it is a producer named Brian Ross. Never hear what the studio was, the format, the engineer, the mics. Nada.


What I do know about this band was that Keith Olson was the bass player. He later went on to fame as producer for Fleetwood Mac and owner of Goodnight LA studio.
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greg thum

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Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
« Reply #31 on: March 10, 2005, 11:39:36 am »

 Murray-always been partial to "Open My Eyes"as well as "Hello It`s Me" by Nazz [Todd Rundgren`s 3rd. band].Robert "Stewkey" Antoni was an excellent vocalist,his former band "Eizabeth",had the most unique harmonies,sort of a precursor to Crosby,Stills and Nash.


greg thum
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vernier

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Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
« Reply #32 on: March 10, 2005, 12:51:11 pm »

Yeah, that bass on "Open My Eyes" is just awesome (especially when it drops down for the chorus) ..fattest I ever heard on a record.
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Kendrix

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Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
« Reply #33 on: March 10, 2005, 02:03:24 pm »

Ill have to open my boxes of LP's in the basement to give a proper answer.

A few that immediately pop into mind include:

I second all the early Todd Rundgren/Nazz stuff.

Blood Sweat & Tears: I cant quit her

Telstar: all about production.  What a sound.

Paul Revere; Kicks.  Yeah their image and costumes were ridiculous.  Just listen to the tune.  It kicks.  FWIW Paul recent co-wote a tune that apear on the Chesterfield Kings latest.

Someone brought up the Association recently: Along Comes Mary has got something goin on IMHO.

I hate the Monkees.  However, they had some terrific songwriters working for them. If we can separate the song from the artist I'd nominate a few of their tunes.

The Rascals had some great tunes: highlights include Groovin, How can I be sure, People just wanna be free.

Becks Bolero was out of this era.  Whoooa.  

Venus: F. Avalon.  Cheesy and sentimental as hell.  But the production, feel and soaring melody of this pre-beatles pop gem just knocked me out when I was a very youngster.  I've had a soft spot for it ever since.

Up on the roof.  It still gets covered.

A bunch of Motown stuff- mostly the songs writen by Holland/Dozier.  Dancing in the streets, Heat wave... yada yada

In the "pushing the envelope category" how about Gil Scott Herons "The revolution will not be televised".  A pre-cursor to modern rap.

Beau Brummels: Just a Little

Ambrosia is a band whose stuff I still listen to once in a while.  David Pack has got one of the best rock voices ever.
From their first album Nice, Nice Very Nice and Time Waits for No One hold up today as serious compositions and productions IMHO.

Enuf fer now.  I feel old.


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Ken Favata

cgc

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Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
« Reply #34 on: March 10, 2005, 02:17:30 pm »

These recordings which might fall under obscure:

Can's 'Vitamin C' from the album 'Ege Bamyasi' is just a killer groove.  This band isn't widely known, but Radiohead, John Lydon and other acts have stolen liberally from these German greats.  Also, 'Bel-Air' from the following album 'Future Days' is a lengthly relaxed tune that gives a sense of place as well as mood.  The best Can material (1968 to 1974) was recorded using a couple of Revox A77s and a hand built 8 channel mixer.  http://www.spoonrecords.com/

Miles Davis had a similar run of albums during the same period as Can, which pushed music into new areas.  'He Loved Him Madly' points towards ambient and electronic music where texture, mood and space take a more dominant role.  This recording really has a great sense of distance and yet keeps the feeling of ensemble playing that Miles cultivated.

Lee 'Scratch' Perry is a legendary figure in reggae, and he made some classic records at his spartan equipped Black Ark studio.  'Heart of the Congos' remains the one which stands out to me.  The opening track 'Fisherman' sucks you into the hypnotic bass driven sound, and the dub version has Scratch replacing the chorus with a spring reverb saturated orchestra of percussion.  Unreal.

Those interested in the more underground forms of rock have known John Cale's name from his involvement in the Velvet Underground, and his production work.  He has produced a number of solo records over the past three decades and they vary wildly in quality.  The peak of his work came on 1974's 'Fear' and it's opening 'fear is a Man's Best Friend' captures Cale's manic personality really well.  It starts calmly enough, but ends with crashing percussion, flailing overdriven bass and Cale' strangled howl.  Eno and Phil Manzanera oversaw the entire affair and their synth and guitar work add much to the unsettling atmosphere.
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daQuad

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Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
« Reply #35 on: March 10, 2005, 02:51:07 pm »

hmmmmm

Giant sound dept:
Be My Little Baby - Ronettes  Ronnie just kills.
In the Air Tonite - its a cliche now, but still...  80s?
Tarkus  ELP - they did a bunch of great-sounding stuff

Ditto on Todd and JL / ELO  they know how to get tone.
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greg thum

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Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
« Reply #36 on: March 10, 2005, 03:10:26 pm »

 Kendrix-just to add to your angst...you forgot.

 Laugh,Laugh by The Beau Brummels.

David Pack is a very gifted singer,a really distinctive sound.

 How about; Friday On My Mind by The Easybeats.
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vernier

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Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
« Reply #37 on: March 10, 2005, 04:08:08 pm »

Yep, "Friday On My Mind" is great.
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RMoore

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Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
« Reply #38 on: March 10, 2005, 05:08:31 pm »

cgc wrote on Thu, 10 March 2005 20:17

These recordings which might fall under obscure:

Can's 'Vitamin C' from the album 'Ege Bamyasi' is just a killer groove.  This band isn't widely known, but Radiohead, John Lydon and other acts have stolen liberally from these German greats.  Also, 'Bel-Air' from the following album 'Future Days' is a lengthly relaxed tune that gives a sense of place as well as mood.  The best Can material (1968 to 1974) was recorded using a couple of Revox A77s and a hand built 8 channel mixer.  http://www.spoonrecords.com/

Miles Davis had a similar run of albums during the same period as Can, which pushed music into new areas.  'He Loved Him Madly' points towards ambient and electronic music where texture, mood and space take a more dominant role.  This recording really has a great sense of distance and yet keeps the feeling of ensemble playing that Miles cultivated.

Lee 'Scratch' Perry is a legendary figure in reggae, and he made some classic records at his spartan equipped Black Ark studio.  'Heart of the Congos' remains the one which stands out to me.  The opening track 'Fisherman' sucks you into the hypnotic bass driven sound, and the dub version has Scratch replacing the chorus with a spring reverb saturated orchestra of percussion.  Unreal.

Those interested in the more underground forms of rock have known John Cale's name from his involvement in the Velvet Underground, and his production work.  He has produced a number of solo records over the past three decades and they vary wildly in quality.  The peak of his work came on 1974's 'Fear' and it's opening 'fear is a Man's Best Friend' captures Cale's manic personality really well.  It starts calmly enough, but ends with crashing percussion, flailing overdriven bass and Cale' strangled howl.  Eno and Phil Manzanera oversaw the entire affair and their synth and guitar work add much to the unsettling atmosphere.


GREAT to see Can mentioned here!!!

I was just considering mentioning Can for this thread.

I went through a heavy Can phase where I ate, slept and breathed CAN for years...ahh, those were the days!

I love the groove on 'Mushroom' as well from the same disc,


Thumbs up obviously on Lee Perry & the rest too,

groovy!
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neve1073

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Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
« Reply #39 on: March 10, 2005, 05:22:49 pm »

A good friend of mine did some work for Lee Perry a few years ago. Apparantly he get's very crabby if he doesn't have ganja. His wife is Swiss, I think, and organizes his life for him.

Lee Perry did some GREAT stuff!


Captain Beefheart did some wonderful records too. My faves are clearspot and spotlight kid.
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Consul

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Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
« Reply #40 on: March 10, 2005, 06:07:37 pm »

Right now, I'm listening to "Right Down the Line" by Gerry Rafferty, and I'm thinking, "WOW! This is some pretty cool stuff!" Very Happy

It has a very smooth sound to it that suits the song very well. Everything flows, and nothing sounds out of place.
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J.J. Blair

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Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
« Reply #41 on: March 10, 2005, 07:54:00 pm »

I had the tube on today, and they were showing the movie "Frequency".  At one point, Dennis Quaid is in some go-go joint and they are playing Fleetwood Mac's "Rattle Snake Shake".  An incredible song and a fucking killer 6 string bass solo.  

Speaking of which, since somebody mentioned Beefheart, about 15 years ago, when WXRT was a great station and AAA didn't yet exist, I was listening late one night and the DJ was playing "Low Yo Yo Stuff", which has subtle references to masturbation.  I knew that this DJ was a big pre-Buckingham/Nicks Fleetwood Mac fan, so I called the station to try to get him to follow it with "Rattlesnake Shake", which covers the same topic.  Well, they never answered the phone, but apparently he was thinking the same thing, because while I am waiting for them to pick up the phone, they start playing "Rattlesnake Shake".  Blew my mind.

Funny to think that Ambrosia started out as a prog rock band.  "How Much I Feel" ain't exactly prog ... but then again, neither were Phil Collins' big pop ballads.

I met Shel Talmy, recently.  I e-mailed him a couple days later and was really embarrassed when my friend who introduced us told me he was blind, because my e-mail said, "I was the tall guy wearing the plaid pants."  D'oh!  Anyway, if you think about the sound that Shel pretty much defined, that you can hear running through tunes like the Creation's "Making Time", the Kinks' "You Really Got Me", The Who's "Anyway, Anyhow, Anywhere", or the aforementioned Easybeats' "Friday On My Mind.  Nobody else was rocking that hard at the time.  That's some ground breaking shit.

BTW, is it just me or did the stuff that Rundgren engineered himself towards the end of the '70s and early '80s really sound like ass?
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Greg Dixon

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Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
« Reply #42 on: March 10, 2005, 07:55:02 pm »

What about 'Waterloo Sunset' by The Kinks. A rough as guts recording, that always brings a smile to my face. Very Happy Same deal with some of Dylan's albums. Rough peformances, that would never be released today, but they just take you somewhere else.
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compasspnt

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Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
« Reply #43 on: March 10, 2005, 08:13:22 pm »

Murray Cullen wrote on Thu, 10 March 2005 16:08

Yep, "Friday On My Mind" is great.


I agree that "Friday On My Mind" is one of the all time great tracks..and The Easybeats an all time great group.

Off topic a bit, here is a very strange fact concerning a member of The Easybeats, Stevie Wright:

"...In later years he suffered debilitating drug and alcohol problems which were further exacerbated by his self-admission to the notorious Chelmsford Private Hospital in Sydney; director Dr. Harry Bailey administered a highly controversial treatment known as "deep sleep therapy" which allegedly cured drug addiction with a combination of drug-induced coma and electroshock. Many patients, including Wright, suffered brain damage and lifelong after-effects and dozens of patients died as a result of the so-called 'treatment'. The scandal was later exposed, but Bailey avoided prosecution by committing suicide..."
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M Kearns

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Re: Songs from the 60's and 70's, obscure or not, that really stand out
« Reply #44 on: March 10, 2005, 09:47:16 pm »

There was a US compilation of John Cale songs titled "Guts", combining the English release & songs from other Cale releases.
The vocal sound on much of these songs completely changed the way I hear recordings. The most present, in your face sound I'd ever encountered.

Also last week, a client showed up with a copy of Spooky Tooth, "Spooky Two". Absolutely wild production. The first tune begins with the entire band straight up mono except the drums split hard R/L with the left being an in time delay. When the mix moves to stereo, Bam. Classic psychedelia.

Without any elaboration,

The "Nazz Nazz", "1969, The Velvet Underground Live", The Band's 2nd LP, Jeff Beck "Truth", and of course everything Hendrix put out during his lifetime.

Yep, another old guy here.
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