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Author Topic: The Killer B's  (Read 2426 times)

Radd 47

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The Killer B's
« on: February 01, 2005, 09:59:30 pm »

Terry, great to have you here!

Were you down south when ZZ recorded the tracks for Tres Hombres?
What was that cinder block studio like> I here the Mom and Pop owners were kind of rough! (The Killer B's)

Did you do that change from Waitin to Jesus or was that the mastering guy?

That's my all time favorite transition.

What kind of equipment did they have there?

Was the "Hambone" really that much of a slave driver?

Thanks!

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compasspnt

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Re: The Killer B's
« Reply #1 on: February 02, 2005, 03:04:51 am »

Radd 47 wrote on Tue, 01 February 2005 21:59


Were you down south when ZZ recorded the tracks for Tres Hombres?
What was that cinder block studio like> I here the Mom and Pop owners were kind of rough! (The Killer B's)

Did you do that change from Waitin to Jesus or was that the mastering guy?

That's my all time favorite transition.

What kind of equipment did they have there?

Was the "Hambone" really that much of a slave driver?



Hey Radd,

The ZZ Top 'Tres Hombres' album was partly tracked when it came to me.  The already recorded parts were done at Robin Hood Studios in Tyler, TX, owned & run by Robin "Hood" Brian.  I THINK it may still be there.

I was not present at these initial Texas recordings.  However, we recorded additional tracks, and did a fair amnount of overdubbing on Tres H, and then I mixed the entire album.  All of this was at Ardent Studios in Memphis, in their Studio 'A.'  The desk was a SpectraSonics, which I think is one of the great consoles, and certainly the most underrated of all.

The transition between Jesus Just Left Chicago/Waitin For The Bus was my idea.  I really like it when tracks can "go together" and become more than two separate songs (the whole is more than the sum of the parts), and I'm always looking for places to do it.  However, unless it's planned, there are rare instances where it can work to advantage; if wrong, it can sound quite ridiculous.  This was one of the instances where it worked.    You rarely hear just one of those songs played independently.  The added benefit was that they got longer radio plays with this!

As for Bill Ham, I never thought of him as a 'slave driver.'  I like to work hard though, so I may just not have noticed!  Bill is an amazing, often misunderstood man.  We have been friends for many years, although I rarely see him anymore.  Bill was the King of the negotiation; he would "never hear" anything he didn't like, and he'd never take "No" for an answer.  Few know it, but Bill was an artist on the Dot record label many years ago, and HIS producer was none other than Pat Boone!!!

Thanks for your ZZ questions, and your interest in their music.  They were a special group for many years.

All the best,

Terry
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