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Author Topic: How to Prepare Your Songs for Professional Mastering  (Read 561 times)

Jack Garufi

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How to Prepare Your Songs for Professional Mastering
« on: March 09, 2017, 04:00:26 am »

Mastering is the final step of the music production process.

If youíre anxious to make your friends listen to a preview of your latest single, you can bounce a reference mix with all the limiters you like on it, but thatís not mastering.
I could simply put a very fancy Peak Limiter Plugin on my master bus so that my perfectly mixed song sounds just as loud as the ones on the radio, why not? Iím afraid thatís not enough, in fact you should look for a real mastering engineer to polish your mix and make it really sounds like the ones on the radio.

Here are a few tips to make sure the mastering engineer youíve hired can do his job properly.

FULL ARTICLE HERE:
https://bantamu.com/tips-and-interviews/26-how-to-prepare-your-songs-for-professional-mastering
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Fletcher

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Re: How to Prepare Your Songs for Professional Mastering
« Reply #1 on: March 09, 2017, 11:21:50 am »

Interesting article... several inaccuracies, but they're mainly in the historical warm up to the crux of the biscuit.  The Albini bit was Steve being Steve [and ya gotta love him for his purist ethos -- which for the most part, I agree with on damn near every level].

This is some very good information for those that are just starting out as the traditional "apprentice" system has gone the way of the horse and buggy... and some folks playing along at home really need to read stuff like this.

Peace
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CN Fletcher

mwagener wrote on Sat, 11 September 2004 14:33
We are selling emotions, there are no emotions in a grid


"Recording engineers are an arrogant bunch
If you've spent most of your life with a few thousand dollars worth of musicians in the studio, making a decision every second and a half... and you and  they are going to have to live with it for the rest of your lives, you'll get pretty arrogant too.  It takes a certain amount of balls to do that... something around three"
Malcolm Chisholm
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