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Author Topic: beat detective  (Read 5566 times)

j.hall

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beat detective
« on: August 12, 2011, 01:05:22 pm »

is the biggest pile os crap in PT version 8 and 9.  what the hell happened???????!!!!!
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Jason Poff

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Re: beat detective
« Reply #1 on: August 13, 2011, 11:52:13 am »

I find it useful for smoothing edits...sometimes...and that's about it.
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Ryan G

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Re: beat detective
« Reply #2 on: August 13, 2011, 02:04:11 pm »

They spent all their time "developing" elastic audio.  They should have just paid Serato to use their math.
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colinl

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Re: beat detective
« Reply #3 on: August 13, 2011, 02:54:06 pm »

I've been using Elastic Audio for all my drum edits and ever since 8 came out I haven't encountered the "cymbal thing".  That being said, I was never taught or could figure out beat detective on my own.
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j.hall

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Re: beat detective
« Reply #4 on: August 14, 2011, 03:24:10 pm »

it's pretty pathetic that they had something near perfect, and they literally turned it to an unusable pile of feces.  elastic audio seems like it would double the time spent on fixing drums.  as far as i can tell Xform is the only engine EA has that's worth a crap, and that takes forever to process, which you have to then do twice.

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Ryan G

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Re: beat detective
« Reply #5 on: August 15, 2011, 02:03:06 am »

Hence the quotes around developing. It would be a pretty powerful tool if you could select different programs besides Digi's.  I use Pitch N Time, it rocks.  Even if I could just select it to change the tempo of a loop or something, I would have a use for EA and could save time.  One of the few functions that I feel Logic does better.  Gasp.
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j.hall

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Re: beat detective
« Reply #6 on: August 23, 2011, 12:59:49 pm »

in chicago right now, wishing i had an ice pick to stick in my eye. 

tried elastic audio.  that's a joke too.  considering keeping a version 7.4 rig around.
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iCombs

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Re: beat detective
« Reply #7 on: September 10, 2011, 03:37:18 pm »

I'm in the middle of a pretty heavy drum edit project right now using PTLE 8.

I had to jury-rig a BD workflow (no CPT, therefore no multitrack BD), but it's been pretty seamless for me.

Basically, it goes like this:

1) create stereo "Drumslicer" track, set input to available stereo bus.
2) send desired trigger elements (kick in, snare top, toms, perhaps high hat and ride if they're broken out and you think they're necessary) to "Drumslicer" track.
3) Record desired section.
4) Use BD to analyze and split secionts
5) Turn off tab to transient
6) Group "Drumslicer" to the rest of your drum tracks
7) Use tab and B (if in keyboard focus) to split other drum tracks on splits created by BD on the drumslicer.
8) Use Command+0 to quantize...or move them manually.  Unfortunately, I haven't found a workaround for grid strength, but I find that if I'm going so far as to do this sort of editing, smacking the shit straight to the grid isn't going to...ruin anything.  There was probably nothing to "ruin" in the first place.
9) Use BD to smooth edits
10) duplicate tracks (just in case)
11) command+comma to ditch sync points
12) batch fade
13) Consolidate

Going through this process, I've been going from raw drums to completely finished edits in an hour or so.  I'm also using this time to replace bad hits (if I have to)(which...again...if I'm going this far...I'm probably gonna have to) and fly sections around.  Once everything is flown, I run Massey DRT on the tracks and use that to insert my samples.

http://www.youtube.com/embed/YryTJdwKDkA

A quick vid on how I do that.  I'm down to about 2 hours total time from raw tracks to completely finished drums (when I have to employ this much...erm...technology).
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Ryan G

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Re: beat detective
« Reply #8 on: September 13, 2011, 04:10:51 pm »

I mean this is the most sincere was possible...That seems like way to much work for me.  You can purchase just a license for MTBD through certain people online.  I found one two years ago for $99.  I didn't need the whole MPTK, but needed that.  You could probably find it dirt cheap today and save yourself some time and sanity; but if you like it stick with it.  Just a thought that may be worth looking into.
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iCombs

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Re: beat detective
« Reply #9 on: September 13, 2011, 08:13:15 pm »

Well...I don't think I CAN purchase a legit version of that toolkit anymore for LE8.  I'm stuck on LE 8.0.0 because my main tracking system is still a G5...I had it laying around.

It won't be an issue any further when I upgrade to PT9...as far as I'm aware.

And truth be told...it LOOKS like a more convoluted process than it is.  It doesn't really add a whole ton more TIME onto the process vs. MTBD.
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Mo Facta

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Re: beat detective
« Reply #10 on: September 21, 2012, 07:07:36 am »

Haha.

Cubase's group editing function is SOOOO much better and simpler.

Just sayin.

Cheers :P
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